Extension of Cross-Media Electronic Reporting Rule Deadline for Authorized Programs, 61773-61776 [E8-24825]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 202 / Friday, October 17, 2008 / Proposed Rules demands for production of documents or information, and does not create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable by any party against the United States. jlentini on PROD1PC65 with PROPOSALS § 1703.4 Procedure for production. (a) Whenever a demand is made for ODNI information or material, the employee who received the demand shall immediately notify OGC ((703) 275–2527). The OGC and the ODNI employee shall then follow the procedures set forth in this section. (b) The OGC may assert any and all defenses before any search for potentially responsive ODNI information or material begins. Further, in its sole discretion the ODNI may decline to begin a search for potentially responsive ODNI information or material until a final and nonappealable disposition of any or all of the asserted defenses is made by the federal, state, local or government entity of competent jurisdiction. When the OGC determines that it is appropriate to search for potentially responsive ODNI information and material, the OGC will forward the demand to the appropriate ODNI offices or entities with responsibility for the ODNI information or material sought in the demand. Those ODNI offices or entities shall then search for and provide to the OGC all potentially responsive ODNI information and material. The OGC may then assert any and all defenses to the production of what it determines is responsive ODNI information or material. (c) In reaching a decision on whether to produce responsive ODNI information or material, or to object to the demand, the OGC shall consider whether: (1) Any relevant privileges are applicable; (2) The applicable rules of discovery or procedure require production; (3) Production would violate a statute, regulation, executive order or other provision of law; (4) Production would violate a nondisclosure agreement; (5) Production would be inconsistent with the DNI’s responsibility to protect intelligence sources and methods, or reveal classified information or state secrets; (6) Production would violate a specific ODNI policy issuance or instruction; and (7) Production would unduly interfere with the orderly conduct of ODNI functions. (d) If oral or written testimony is sought by a demand in a case or matter in which the ODNI is not a party, a VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:14 Oct 16, 2008 Jkt 217001 reasonably detailed description of the testimony sought in the form of an affidavit, or a written statement if that is not feasible, by the party seeking the testimony or its attorney must be furnished to the OGC. (e) The OGC shall notify the appropriate employees of all decisions regarding responses to demands and provide advice and counsel for the implementation of the decisions. (f) If response to a demand is required before a decision is made whether to provide responsive ODNI information or material, an OGC attorney will request that a Department of Justice attorney appear with the ODNI employee upon whom that demand has been made before the court or other competent authority and provide it with a copy of this regulation and inform the court or other authority as to the status of the demand. The court will be requested to stay the demand pending resolution by the ODNI. If the request for a stay is denied or there is a ruling that the demand must be complied with irrespective of instructions rendered in accordance with this Part, the employee upon whom the demand was made shall, if directed to do so by the General Counsel or its designee, respectfully decline to comply with the demand under the authority of United States ex rel. Touhy v. Ragen, 340 U.S. 462 (1951), and this regulation. (g) ODNI officials may delegate in writing any authority given to them in this Part to subordinate officials. (h) Any individual or entity not an ODNI employee as defined in this Part who receives a demand for the production or disclosure of ODNI information or material acquired because of that person’s or entity’s association with the ODNI should notify the OGC ((703) 275–2527) for guidance and assistance. In such cases the provisions of this regulation shall be applicable. § 1703.5 Interpretation. Any questions concerning interpretation of this Regulation shall be referred to the OGC for resolution. Dated: October 2, 2008. Corin R. Stone, Deputy General Counsel, Office of the Director of National Intelligence. [FR Doc. E8–24747 Filed 10–16–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3910–A7–P PO 00000 Frm 00027 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 61773 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 3 [EPA–HQ–OEI–2003–0001; FRL–8730–7] RIN 2025–AA23 Extension of Cross-Media Electronic Reporting Rule Deadline for Authorized Programs Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. AGENCY: SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to amend the Final Cross-Media Electronic Reporting Rule (CROMERR) deadline for authorized programs (states, tribes, or local governments) with existing electronic document receiving systems to submit an application for EPA approval to revise or modify their authorized programs. This action proposes to extend the current October 13, 2008, deadline until January 13, 2010. Additionally, in the ‘‘Rules and Regulations’’ section of this Federal Register, EPA is making this revision as a direct final rule without a prior proposed rule. If the Agency receives no relevant adverse comment, EPA will not take further action on this proposed rule. DATES: Written comments must be received by November 3, 2008. ADDRESSES: Submit your comments, identified by Docket ID No. EPA-HQOEI–2003–0001, by one of the following methods: • www.regulations.gov: Follow the on-line instructions for submitting comments. • E-mail: oei.docket@epa.gov. • Mail: CROMERR Docket, Environmental Protection Agency, Mailcode: 2822T, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20460. Hand Delivery: EPA Docket Room, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Avenue, Washington, DC 20460. Such deliveries are only accepted during the Docket’s normal hours of operation, and special arrangements should be made for deliveries of boxed information. Instructions: Direct your comments to Docket ID No. EPA–HQ–OEI–2003– 0001. EPA’s policy is that all comments received will be included in the public docket without change and may be made available online at www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided, unless the comment includes information claimed to be Confidential Business Information (CBI) or other information whose disclosure is restricted by statute. Do not submit information that you E:\FR\FM\17OCP1.SGM 17OCP1 61774 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 202 / Friday, October 17, 2008 / Proposed Rules consider to be CBI or otherwise protected through www.regulations.gov or e-mail. The www.regulations.gov Web site is an ‘‘anonymous access’’ system, which means EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless you provide it in the body of your comment. If you send an e-mail comment directly to EPA without going through www.regulations.gov your e-mail address will be automatically captured and included as part of the comment that is placed in the public docket and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic comment, EPA recommends that you include your name and other contact information in the body of your comment and with any disk or CD–ROM you submit. If EPA cannot read your comment due to technical difficulties and cannot contact you for clarification, EPA may not be able to consider your comment. Electronic files should avoid the use of special characters, any form of encryption, and be free of any defects or viruses. For additional information about EPA’s public docket visit the EPA Docket Center homepage at http:// www.epa.gov/epahome/dockets.htm. Docket: All documents in the docket are listed in the www.regulations.gov index. Although listed in the index, some information is not publicly available, e.g., CBI or other information whose disclosure is restricted by statute. Certain other material, such as copyrighted material, will be publicly available only in hard copy. Publicly available docket materials are available either electronically in www.regulations.gov or in hard copy at the CROMERR Docket, EPA/DC, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Avenue, NW., Washington, DC. The Public Reading Room is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays. The telephone number for the Public Reading Room is (202) 566–1744, and the telephone number for the CROMERR Docket is (202) 566–1752. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Evi Huffer, Office of Environmental Information (2823T), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20460; (202) 566–1697; huffer.evi@epa.gov, or David Schwarz, Office of Environmental Information (2823T), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20460; (202) 566–1704; schwarz.david@epa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. What Does This Rule Do? This rule proposes to provide temporary regulatory relief to states, tribes, and local governments with ‘‘authorized programs’’ as defined in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 3.3. Any such authorized program that operates an ‘‘existing electronic document receiving system’’ as defined in 40 CFR 3.3 will have an additional 15 months to submit an application to revise or modify its authorized program to meet the requirements of 40 CFR part 3. Specifically, this rule proposes to amend 40 CFR 3.1000(a)(3) by extending the October 13, 2008, deadline to January 13, 2010. II. Why Is EPA Issuing This Proposed Rule? EPA proposes to extend the current due date for submitting applications under CROMERR for authorized programs with existing electronic document receiving systems, and imposes no additional requirements beyond those imposed by the underlying final rule (70 FR 59848, October 13, 2005). EPA has published a direct final rule in the ‘‘Rules and Regulations’’ section of this Federal Register because EPA views this as a noncontroversial action and anticipates no adverse comment. We have explained our reasons for this action in the preamble to the direct final rule. If EPA receives no adverse comment, the Agency will not take further action on this proposed rule. If EPA receives adverse comment, the Agency will withdraw the direct final rule and it will not take effect. EPA will address all relevant public comments in any subsequent final rule based on this proposed rule. EPA will not institute a second comment period on this action. Any parties interested in commenting on this proposed rule or the direct final rule listed elsewhere in today’s Federal Register must do so at this time. For further information about commenting, please see the ADDRESSES section of this document. III. Does This Action Apply to Me? This action will affect states, tribes, and local governments that have an authorized program as defined in 40 CFR 3.3 and also have an existing electronic document receiving system, as defined in 40 CFR 3.3. For purposes of this rulemaking, the term ‘‘state’’ includes the District of Columbia and the United States territories, as specified in the applicable statutes. That is, the term ‘‘state’’ includes the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, and the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, depending on the statute. Category Examples of affected entities Local government ............................................... Publicly owned treatment works, owners and operators of treatment works treating domestic sewage, local and regional air boards, local and regional waste management authorities, and municipal and other drinking water authorities. States, tribes or territories that administer any federal environmental programs delegated, authorized, or approved by EPA under Title 40 of the CFR. jlentini on PROD1PC65 with PROPOSALS Tribe and State governments ............................. This table is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather provides a guide for readers regarding entities likely to be affected by this action. If you have questions regarding the applicability of this action to a particular entity, consult the person listed in the preceding FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section. VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:14 Oct 16, 2008 Jkt 217001 IV. What Should I Consider as I Prepare My Comments for EPA? A. Submitting CBI. Do not submit this information to EPA through www.regulations.gov or e-mail. Clearly mark the part or all of the information that you claim to be CBI. For CBI in a disk or CD–ROM that you mail to EPA, mark the outside of the disk or CD–ROM as CBI and then identify electronically within the disk or CD–ROM the specific PO 00000 Frm 00028 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 information that is claimed as CBI. In addition to one complete version of the comment that includes information claimed as CBI, a copy of the comment that does not contain the information claimed as CBI must be submitted for inclusion in the public docket. Information so marked will not be disclosed except in accordance with procedures set forth in 40 CFR part 2. E:\FR\FM\17OCP1.SGM 17OCP1 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 202 / Friday, October 17, 2008 / Proposed Rules B. Tips for Preparing Your Comments. When submitting comments, remember to: • Identify the rulemaking by docket number and other identifying information (subject heading, Federal Register date and page number). • Follow directions—The agency may ask you to respond to specific questions or organize comments by referencing a Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part or section number. • Explain why you agree or disagree; suggest alternatives and substitute language for your requested changes. • Describe any assumptions and provide any technical information and/ or data that you used. • If you estimate potential costs or burdens, explain how you arrived at your estimate in sufficient detail to allow for it to be reproduced. • Provide specific examples to illustrate your concerns, and suggest alternatives. • Explain your views as clearly as possible, avoiding the use of profanity or personal threats. • Make sure to submit your comments by the comment period deadline identified. V. Summary of Rule This proposed rule would amend 40 CFR 3.1000(a)(3) by extending the current October 13, 2008 deadline for authorized programs with existing electronic document receiving systems to submit applications to January 13, 2010. For additional discussion of the proposed rule change, see the direct final rule EPA has published in the ‘‘Rules and Regulations’’ section of today’s Federal Register. This proposal incorporates by reference all the reasoning, explanation, and regulatory text from the direct final rule. VI. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews A. Executive Order 12866: Regulatory Planning and Review This action is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under the terms of Executive Order (E.O.) 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993) and is therefore not subject to review under the E.O. jlentini on PROD1PC65 with PROPOSALS B. Paperwork Reduction Act This action does not impose any information collection burden. This action merely extends the current due date for submitting applications under CROMERR for authorized programs with existing electronic document receiving systems, and imposes no additional requirements. However, the VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:14 Oct 16, 2008 Jkt 217001 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has previously approved the information collection requirements contained in the existing regulations (40 CFR part 3) under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, 44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq. and has assigned OMB control number 2025–0003, EPA ICR number 2002.03. A copy of the OMB approved Information Collection Request (ICR) may be obtained from Susan Auby, Collection Strategies Division; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (2822T); 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20460 or by calling (202) 566–1672. The ICR is also available electronically in www.regulations.gov. Burden means the total time, effort, or financial resources expended by persons to generate, maintain, retain, or disclose or provide information to or for a federal agency. This includes the time needed to review instructions; develop, acquire, install, and utilize technology and systems for the purposes of collecting, validating, and verifying information, processing and maintaining information, and disclosing and providing information; adjust the existing ways to comply with any previously applicable instructions and requirements; train personnel to be able to respond to a collection of information; search data sources; complete and review the collection of information; and transmit or otherwise disclose the information. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for EPA’s regulations in 40 CFR are listed in 40 CFR part 9. C. Regulatory Flexibility Act The Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) generally requires an agency to prepare a regulatory flexibility analysis of any rule subject to notice and comment rulemaking requirements under the Administrative Procedure Act or any other statute unless the agency certifies that the rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. Small entities include small businesses, small organizations, and small governmental jurisdictions. For purposes of assessing the impacts of this proposed rule on small entities, a small entity is defined as: (1) A small business that meets the definition for small businesses based on SBA size standards at 13 CFR 121.201; (2) a small governmental jurisdiction that is a government of a city, county, town, school district or special district with a PO 00000 Frm 00029 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 61775 population of less than 50,000 (Under the RFA definition, States and tribal governments are not considered small governmental jurisdictions.); and (3) a small organization that is any not-forprofit enterprise which is independently owned and operated and is not dominant in its field. After considering the possibility of economic impacts of today’s proposed rule on small entities, I certify that this action will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. The small entities directly regulated by this proposed rule are small governmental jurisdictions. In determining whether a rule has a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities, the impact of concern is any significant adverse economic impact on small entities, since the primary purpose of the regulatory flexibility analyses is to identify and address regulatory alternatives ‘‘which minimize any significant economic impact of the rule on small entities.’’ Thus, an agency may certify that a rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities if the rule relieves regulatory burden, or otherwise has a positive economic effect on all of the small entities subject to the rule. This proposed rule merely extends the current due date for submitting applications under CROMERR for authorized programs with existing electronic document receiving systems. EPA has therefore concluded that today’s action will relieve regulatory burden for all affected small entities. We continue to be interested in the potential impacts of the proposed rule on small entities and welcome comments on issues related to such impacts. D. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act This action contains no Federal mandates under the provisions of Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (UMRA), 2 U.S.C. 1531– 1538 for state, tribe, or local governments or the private sector. This action merely extends the current due date for submitting applications under CROMERR for authorized programs with existing electronic document receiving systems, and imposes no additional requirements. EPA has determined that this rule does not contain a federal mandate that may result in expenditures of $100 million or more for states, tribes, and local governments, in the aggregate, or the private sector in any one year. Therefore, this action is not subject to E:\FR\FM\17OCP1.SGM 17OCP1 61776 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 202 / Friday, October 17, 2008 / Proposed Rules the requirements of sections 202 and 205 of the UMRA. This action is also not subject to the requirements of section 203 of UMRA because it contains no regulatory requirements that might significantly or uniquely affect small governments. This action merely extends the current due date for submitting applications under CROMERR for authorized programs with existing electronic document receiving systems, and imposes no additional requirements. E. Executive Order 13132: Federalism Executive Order 13132, entitled ‘‘Federalism’’ (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999), requires EPA to develop an accountable process to ensure ‘‘meaningful and timely input by State and local officials in the development of regulatory policies that have federalism implications.’’ ‘‘Policies that have federalism implications’’ is defined in the Executive Order to include regulations that have ‘‘substantial direct effects on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government.’’ This action does not have federalism implications. It will not have substantial direct effects on the states, on the relationship between the national government and the states, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government, as specified in Executive Order 13132. This action merely extends the current due date for submitting applications under CROMERR for authorized programs with existing electronic document receiving systems, and imposes no additional requirements. Thus, Executive Order 13132 does not apply to this rule. jlentini on PROD1PC65 with PROPOSALS F. Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments This action does not have tribal implications, as specified in Executive Order 13175 (65 FR 67249, November 9, 2000). It will neither impose substantial direct compliance costs on tribal governments, nor preempt Tribal law. This action merely extends the current due date for submitting applications under CROMERR for authorized programs with existing electronic document receiving systems, and VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:14 Oct 16, 2008 Jkt 217001 imposes no additional requirements. Thus, Executive Order 13175 does not apply to this action. G. Executive Order 13045: Children’s Health Protection Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997) applies to any rule that (1) is determined to be ‘‘economically significant’’ as defined under Executive Order 12866, and (2) concerns an environmental health or safety risk that EPA has reason to believe may have a disproportionate effect on children. If the regulatory action meets both criteria, the Agency must evaluate the environmental health or safety effects of the planned rule on children, and explain why the planned regulation is preferable to other potentially effective and reasonably feasible alternatives considered by the Agency. EPA interprets Executive Order 13045 as applying only to those regulatory actions that are based on health or safety risks, such that the analysis required under section 5–501 of the Order has the potential to influence the regulation. This proposed rule is not subject to Executive Order 13045 because it is not an economically significant action as defined by Executive Order 12866 and it does not establish an environmental standard intended to mitigate health or safety risks. This action merely extends the current due date for submitting applications under CROMERR for authorized programs with existing electronic document receiving systems, and imposes no additional requirements. H. Executive Order 13211: Energy Effects This rule is not subject to Executive Order 13211, ‘‘Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use’’ (66 FR 28355 (May 22, 2001)) because it is not a significant regulatory action under Executive Order 12866. I. National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act Section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (NTTAA), Public Law 104– 113, section 12(d) (15 U.S.C. 272 note) directs EPA to use voluntary consensus standards in its regulatory activities unless to do so would be inconsistent with applicable law or otherwise PO 00000 Frm 00030 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 impractical. Voluntary consensus standards are technical standards (e.g., materials specifications, test methods, sampling procedures, and business practices) that are developed or adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies. The NTTAA directs EPA to provide Congress, through OMB, with explanations when the Agency decides not to use available and applicable voluntary consensus standards. Today’s action does not involve technical standards. EPA’s compliance with section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104–113, 12(d) (15 U.S.C. 272 note)) has been addressed in the preamble of the underlying final rule [70 FR 59848, October 13, 2007]. J. Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions To Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations Executive Order (EO) 12898 (59 FR 7629 (Feb. 16, 1994)) establishes federal executive policy on environmental justice. Its main provision directs federal agencies, to the greatest extent practicable and permitted by law, to make environmental justice part of their mission by identifying and addressing, as appropriate, disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental effects of their programs, policies, and activities on minority populations and low-income populations in the United States. EPA has determined that this proposed rule will not have disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental effects on minority or low-income populations because it does not affect the level of protection provided to human health or the environment. This proposed rule merely extends the current regulatory schedule for submitting applications under CROMERR for authorized programs with existing electronic document receiving systems. List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 3 Environmental protection, Conflict of interests, Electronic records, Electronic reporting requirements, Electronic reports, Intergovernmental relations. Dated: October 10, 2008. Stephen L. Johnson, Administrator. [FR Doc. E8–24825 Filed 10–16–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560–50–P E:\FR\FM\17OCP1.SGM 17OCP1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 202 (Friday, October 17, 2008)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 61773-61776]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-24825]


=======================================================================
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

40 CFR Part 3

[EPA-HQ-OEI-2003-0001; FRL-8730-7]
RIN 2025-AA23


Extension of Cross-Media Electronic Reporting Rule Deadline for 
Authorized Programs

AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ACTION: Proposed rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to amend the Final Cross-Media Electronic 
Reporting Rule (CROMERR) deadline for authorized programs (states, 
tribes, or local governments) with existing electronic document 
receiving systems to submit an application for EPA approval to revise 
or modify their authorized programs. This action proposes to extend the 
current October 13, 2008, deadline until January 13, 2010. 
Additionally, in the ``Rules and Regulations'' section of this Federal 
Register, EPA is making this revision as a direct final rule without a 
prior proposed rule. If the Agency receives no relevant adverse 
comment, EPA will not take further action on this proposed rule.

DATES: Written comments must be received by November 3, 2008.

ADDRESSES: Submit your comments, identified by Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-
OEI-2003-0001, by one of the following methods:
     www.regulations.gov: Follow the on-line instructions for 
submitting comments.
     E-mail: oei.docket@epa.gov.
     Mail: CROMERR Docket, Environmental Protection Agency, 
Mailcode: 2822T, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20460. 
Hand Delivery: EPA Docket Room, EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution 
Avenue, Washington, DC 20460. Such deliveries are only accepted during 
the Docket's normal hours of operation, and special arrangements should 
be made for deliveries of boxed information.
    Instructions: Direct your comments to Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OEI-
2003-0001. EPA's policy is that all comments received will be included 
in the public docket without change and may be made available online at 
www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided, 
unless the comment includes information claimed to be Confidential 
Business Information (CBI) or other information whose disclosure is 
restricted by statute. Do not submit information that you

[[Page 61774]]

consider to be CBI or otherwise protected through www.regulations.gov 
or e-mail. The www.regulations.gov Web site is an ``anonymous access'' 
system, which means EPA will not know your identity or contact 
information unless you provide it in the body of your comment. If you 
send an e-mail comment directly to EPA without going through 
www.regulations.gov your e-mail address will be automatically captured 
and included as part of the comment that is placed in the public docket 
and made available on the Internet. If you submit an electronic 
comment, EPA recommends that you include your name and other contact 
information in the body of your comment and with any disk or CD-ROM you 
submit. If EPA cannot read your comment due to technical difficulties 
and cannot contact you for clarification, EPA may not be able to 
consider your comment. Electronic files should avoid the use of special 
characters, any form of encryption, and be free of any defects or 
viruses. For additional information about EPA's public docket visit the 
EPA Docket Center homepage at http://www.epa.gov/epahome/dockets.htm.
    Docket: All documents in the docket are listed in the 
www.regulations.gov index. Although listed in the index, some 
information is not publicly available, e.g., CBI or other information 
whose disclosure is restricted by statute. Certain other material, such 
as copyrighted material, will be publicly available only in hard copy. 
Publicly available docket materials are available either electronically 
in www.regulations.gov or in hard copy at the CROMERR Docket, EPA/DC, 
EPA West, Room 3334, 1301 Constitution Avenue, NW., Washington, DC. The 
Public Reading Room is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, excluding legal holidays. The telephone number for the Public 
Reading Room is (202) 566-1744, and the telephone number for the 
CROMERR Docket is (202) 566-1752.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Evi Huffer, Office of Environmental 
Information (2823T), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania 
Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20460; (202) 566-1697; huffer.evi@epa.gov, 
or David Schwarz, Office of Environmental Information (2823T), 
Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., 
Washington, DC 20460; (202) 566-1704; schwarz.david@epa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. What Does This Rule Do?

    This rule proposes to provide temporary regulatory relief to 
states, tribes, and local governments with ``authorized programs'' as 
defined in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 3.3. Any such 
authorized program that operates an ``existing electronic document 
receiving system'' as defined in 40 CFR 3.3 will have an additional 15 
months to submit an application to revise or modify its authorized 
program to meet the requirements of 40 CFR part 3. Specifically, this 
rule proposes to amend 40 CFR 3.1000(a)(3) by extending the October 13, 
2008, deadline to January 13, 2010.

II. Why Is EPA Issuing This Proposed Rule?

    EPA proposes to extend the current due date for submitting 
applications under CROMERR for authorized programs with existing 
electronic document receiving systems, and imposes no additional 
requirements beyond those imposed by the underlying final rule (70 FR 
59848, October 13, 2005). EPA has published a direct final rule in the 
``Rules and Regulations'' section of this Federal Register because EPA 
views this as a noncontroversial action and anticipates no adverse 
comment. We have explained our reasons for this action in the preamble 
to the direct final rule.
    If EPA receives no adverse comment, the Agency will not take 
further action on this proposed rule. If EPA receives adverse comment, 
the Agency will withdraw the direct final rule and it will not take 
effect. EPA will address all relevant public comments in any subsequent 
final rule based on this proposed rule.
    EPA will not institute a second comment period on this action. Any 
parties interested in commenting on this proposed rule or the direct 
final rule listed elsewhere in today's Federal Register must do so at 
this time. For further information about commenting, please see the 
ADDRESSES section of this document.

III. Does This Action Apply to Me?

    This action will affect states, tribes, and local governments that 
have an authorized program as defined in 40 CFR 3.3 and also have an 
existing electronic document receiving system, as defined in 40 CFR 
3.3. For purposes of this rulemaking, the term ``state'' includes the 
District of Columbia and the United States territories, as specified in 
the applicable statutes. That is, the term ``state'' includes the 
District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin 
Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana 
Islands, and the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, depending on 
the statute.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
           Category                  Examples of affected entities
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Local government.............  Publicly owned treatment works, owners
                                and operators of treatment works
                                treating domestic sewage, local and
                                regional air boards, local and regional
                                waste management authorities, and
                                municipal and other drinking water
                                authorities.
Tribe and State governments..  States, tribes or territories that
                                administer any federal environmental
                                programs delegated, authorized, or
                                approved by EPA under Title 40 of the
                                CFR.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This table is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather provides a 
guide for readers regarding entities likely to be affected by this 
action. If you have questions regarding the applicability of this 
action to a particular entity, consult the person listed in the 
preceding FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section.

IV. What Should I Consider as I Prepare My Comments for EPA?

    A. Submitting CBI. Do not submit this information to EPA through 
www.regulations.gov or e-mail. Clearly mark the part or all of the 
information that you claim to be CBI. For CBI in a disk or CD-ROM that 
you mail to EPA, mark the outside of the disk or CD-ROM as CBI and then 
identify electronically within the disk or CD-ROM the specific 
information that is claimed as CBI. In addition to one complete version 
of the comment that includes information claimed as CBI, a copy of the 
comment that does not contain the information claimed as CBI must be 
submitted for inclusion in the public docket. Information so marked 
will not be disclosed except in accordance with procedures set forth in 
40 CFR part 2.

[[Page 61775]]

    B. Tips for Preparing Your Comments. When submitting comments, 
remember to:
     Identify the rulemaking by docket number and other 
identifying information (subject heading, Federal Register date and 
page number).
     Follow directions--The agency may ask you to respond to 
specific questions or organize comments by referencing a Code of 
Federal Regulations (CFR) part or section number.
     Explain why you agree or disagree; suggest alternatives 
and substitute language for your requested changes.
     Describe any assumptions and provide any technical 
information and/or data that you used.
     If you estimate potential costs or burdens, explain how 
you arrived at your estimate in sufficient detail to allow for it to be 
reproduced.
     Provide specific examples to illustrate your concerns, and 
suggest alternatives.
     Explain your views as clearly as possible, avoiding the 
use of profanity or personal threats.
     Make sure to submit your comments by the comment period 
deadline identified.

V. Summary of Rule

    This proposed rule would amend 40 CFR 3.1000(a)(3) by extending the 
current October 13, 2008 deadline for authorized programs with existing 
electronic document receiving systems to submit applications to January 
13, 2010.
    For additional discussion of the proposed rule change, see the 
direct final rule EPA has published in the ``Rules and Regulations'' 
section of today's Federal Register. This proposal incorporates by 
reference all the reasoning, explanation, and regulatory text from the 
direct final rule.

VI. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews

A. Executive Order 12866: Regulatory Planning and Review

    This action is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under the 
terms of Executive Order (E.O.) 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993) 
and is therefore not subject to review under the E.O.

B. Paperwork Reduction Act

    This action does not impose any information collection burden. This 
action merely extends the current due date for submitting applications 
under CROMERR for authorized programs with existing electronic document 
receiving systems, and imposes no additional requirements. However, the 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has previously approved the 
information collection requirements contained in the existing 
regulations (40 CFR part 3) under the provisions of the Paperwork 
Reduction Act, 44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq. and has assigned OMB control 
number 2025-0003, EPA ICR number 2002.03. A copy of the OMB approved 
Information Collection Request (ICR) may be obtained from Susan Auby, 
Collection Strategies Division; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 
(2822T); 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20460 or by 
calling (202) 566-1672. The ICR is also available electronically in 
www.regulations.gov.
    Burden means the total time, effort, or financial resources 
expended by persons to generate, maintain, retain, or disclose or 
provide information to or for a federal agency. This includes the time 
needed to review instructions; develop, acquire, install, and utilize 
technology and systems for the purposes of collecting, validating, and 
verifying information, processing and maintaining information, and 
disclosing and providing information; adjust the existing ways to 
comply with any previously applicable instructions and requirements; 
train personnel to be able to respond to a collection of information; 
search data sources; complete and review the collection of information; 
and transmit or otherwise disclose the information.
    An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required 
to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a 
currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for EPA's 
regulations in 40 CFR are listed in 40 CFR part 9.

C. Regulatory Flexibility Act

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) generally requires an agency 
to prepare a regulatory flexibility analysis of any rule subject to 
notice and comment rulemaking requirements under the Administrative 
Procedure Act or any other statute unless the agency certifies that the 
rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial 
number of small entities. Small entities include small businesses, 
small organizations, and small governmental jurisdictions.
    For purposes of assessing the impacts of this proposed rule on 
small entities, a small entity is defined as: (1) A small business that 
meets the definition for small businesses based on SBA size standards 
at 13 CFR 121.201; (2) a small governmental jurisdiction that is a 
government of a city, county, town, school district or special district 
with a population of less than 50,000 (Under the RFA definition, States 
and tribal governments are not considered small governmental 
jurisdictions.); and (3) a small organization that is any not-for-
profit enterprise which is independently owned and operated and is not 
dominant in its field.
    After considering the possibility of economic impacts of today's 
proposed rule on small entities, I certify that this action will not 
have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities. The small entities directly regulated by this proposed rule 
are small governmental jurisdictions. In determining whether a rule has 
a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities, the impact of concern is any significant adverse economic 
impact on small entities, since the primary purpose of the regulatory 
flexibility analyses is to identify and address regulatory alternatives 
``which minimize any significant economic impact of the rule on small 
entities.'' Thus, an agency may certify that a rule will not have a 
significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities 
if the rule relieves regulatory burden, or otherwise has a positive 
economic effect on all of the small entities subject to the rule.
    This proposed rule merely extends the current due date for 
submitting applications under CROMERR for authorized programs with 
existing electronic document receiving systems. EPA has therefore 
concluded that today's action will relieve regulatory burden for all 
affected small entities. We continue to be interested in the potential 
impacts of the proposed rule on small entities and welcome comments on 
issues related to such impacts.

D. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act

    This action contains no Federal mandates under the provisions of 
Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (UMRA), 2 U.S.C. 
1531-1538 for state, tribe, or local governments or the private sector. 
This action merely extends the current due date for submitting 
applications under CROMERR for authorized programs with existing 
electronic document receiving systems, and imposes no additional 
requirements. EPA has determined that this rule does not contain a 
federal mandate that may result in expenditures of $100 million or more 
for states, tribes, and local governments, in the aggregate, or the 
private sector in any one year. Therefore, this action is not subject 
to

[[Page 61776]]

the requirements of sections 202 and 205 of the UMRA.
    This action is also not subject to the requirements of section 203 
of UMRA because it contains no regulatory requirements that might 
significantly or uniquely affect small governments. This action merely 
extends the current due date for submitting applications under CROMERR 
for authorized programs with existing electronic document receiving 
systems, and imposes no additional requirements.

E. Executive Order 13132: Federalism

    Executive Order 13132, entitled ``Federalism'' (64 FR 43255, August 
10, 1999), requires EPA to develop an accountable process to ensure 
``meaningful and timely input by State and local officials in the 
development of regulatory policies that have federalism implications.'' 
``Policies that have federalism implications'' is defined in the 
Executive Order to include regulations that have ``substantial direct 
effects on the States, on the relationship between the national 
government and the States, or on the distribution of power and 
responsibilities among the various levels of government.''
    This action does not have federalism implications. It will not have 
substantial direct effects on the states, on the relationship between 
the national government and the states, or on the distribution of power 
and responsibilities among the various levels of government, as 
specified in Executive Order 13132. This action merely extends the 
current due date for submitting applications under CROMERR for 
authorized programs with existing electronic document receiving 
systems, and imposes no additional requirements. Thus, Executive Order 
13132 does not apply to this rule.

F. Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination With Indian 
Tribal Governments

    This action does not have tribal implications, as specified in 
Executive Order 13175 (65 FR 67249, November 9, 2000). It will neither 
impose substantial direct compliance costs on tribal governments, nor 
preempt Tribal law. This action merely extends the current due date for 
submitting applications under CROMERR for authorized programs with 
existing electronic document receiving systems, and imposes no 
additional requirements. Thus, Executive Order 13175 does not apply to 
this action.

G. Executive Order 13045: Children's Health Protection

    Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental 
Health Risks and Safety Risks (62 FR 19885, April 23, 1997) applies to 
any rule that (1) is determined to be ``economically significant'' as 
defined under Executive Order 12866, and (2) concerns an environmental 
health or safety risk that EPA has reason to believe may have a 
disproportionate effect on children. If the regulatory action meets 
both criteria, the Agency must evaluate the environmental health or 
safety effects of the planned rule on children, and explain why the 
planned regulation is preferable to other potentially effective and 
reasonably feasible alternatives considered by the Agency. EPA 
interprets Executive Order 13045 as applying only to those regulatory 
actions that are based on health or safety risks, such that the 
analysis required under section 5-501 of the Order has the potential to 
influence the regulation.
    This proposed rule is not subject to Executive Order 13045 because 
it is not an economically significant action as defined by Executive 
Order 12866 and it does not establish an environmental standard 
intended to mitigate health or safety risks. This action merely extends 
the current due date for submitting applications under CROMERR for 
authorized programs with existing electronic document receiving 
systems, and imposes no additional requirements.

H. Executive Order 13211: Energy Effects

    This rule is not subject to Executive Order 13211, ``Actions 
Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, 
Distribution, or Use'' (66 FR 28355 (May 22, 2001)) because it is not a 
significant regulatory action under Executive Order 12866.

I. National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act

    Section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement 
Act of 1995 (NTTAA), Public Law 104-113, section 12(d) (15 U.S.C. 272 
note) directs EPA to use voluntary consensus standards in its 
regulatory activities unless to do so would be inconsistent with 
applicable law or otherwise impractical. Voluntary consensus standards 
are technical standards (e.g., materials specifications, test methods, 
sampling procedures, and business practices) that are developed or 
adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies. The NTTAA directs EPA 
to provide Congress, through OMB, with explanations when the Agency 
decides not to use available and applicable voluntary consensus 
standards.
    Today's action does not involve technical standards. EPA's 
compliance with section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and 
Advancement Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-113, 12(d) (15 U.S.C. 272 note)) 
has been addressed in the preamble of the underlying final rule [70 FR 
59848, October 13, 2007].

J. Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions To Address Environmental 
Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations

    Executive Order (EO) 12898 (59 FR 7629 (Feb. 16, 1994)) establishes 
federal executive policy on environmental justice. Its main provision 
directs federal agencies, to the greatest extent practicable and 
permitted by law, to make environmental justice part of their mission 
by identifying and addressing, as appropriate, disproportionately high 
and adverse human health or environmental effects of their programs, 
policies, and activities on minority populations and low-income 
populations in the United States.
    EPA has determined that this proposed rule will not have 
disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental 
effects on minority or low-income populations because it does not 
affect the level of protection provided to human health or the 
environment. This proposed rule merely extends the current regulatory 
schedule for submitting applications under CROMERR for authorized 
programs with existing electronic document receiving systems.

List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 3

    Environmental protection, Conflict of interests, Electronic 
records, Electronic reporting requirements, Electronic reports, 
Intergovernmental relations.

    Dated: October 10, 2008.
Stephen L. Johnson,
Administrator.
 [FR Doc. E8-24825 Filed 10-16-08; 8:45 am]
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