Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, 52676-52677 [E8-21011]

Download as PDF 52676 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 176 / Wednesday, September 10, 2008 / Notices pwalker on PROD1PC71 with NOTICES equipment at the USAF Indian Mountain Research Site. This withdrawal comprises 4,606.70 acres of public land located within: Kateel River Meridian T. 7 N., R. 24 E., Secs. 13 to 16, Secs. 21 to 27, Secs. 34, 35, and 36; and T. 7 N., R. 25 E., Secs. 18, and 19 as described in PLO No. 6706 (54 FR 979, January 11, 1989). A complete description, along with all other records pertaining to the extension application, can be examined in the BLM Alaska State Office at the address shown above. As extended, the withdrawal would not alter the application of those public land laws governing the use of land under lease, license, or permit or governing the disposal of the mineral or vegetative resources other than under the mining and mineral leasing laws. The use of a right-of-way or interagency or cooperative agreement would not adequately protect the Federal investment in the Indian Mountain Research Site. There are no suitable alternative sites available since the Indian Mountain Research Site is already constructed on the above-described public land. No water rights would be needed to fulfill the purpose of the requested withdrawal extension. For a period of 90 days from the date of publication of this notice, all persons who wish to submit comments, suggestions, or objections in connection with the proposed withdrawal extension may present their views in writing to the BLM Alaska State Director at the address indicated above. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Individual respondents may request confidentiality. If you wish to withhold your name or address from public review or from disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act, you must state this prominently at the beginning of your comments. Such requests will be honored to the extent allowed by law. All submissions from organizations or businesses, and from individuals identifying themselves as representatives or officials of VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:52 Sep 09, 2008 Jkt 214001 organizations or businesses, will be made available for public inspection in their entirety. Notice is hereby given that an opportunity for a public meeting is afforded in connection with the proposed withdrawal extension. All interested parties who desire a public meeting for the purpose of being heard on the proposed extension must submit a written request to the BLM Alaska State Director within 90 days from the date of publication of this notice. Upon determination by the authorized officer that a public meeting will be held, a notice of the time and place will be published in the Federal Register at least 30 days before the scheduled date of the meeting. The withdrawal extension proposal will be processed in accordance with the regulations set forth in 43 CFR 2310.4 and subject to Section 810 of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, 16 U.S.C. 3120 (2000). Authority: 43 CFR 2310.3–1(b). Dated: September 3, 2008. Carolyn J. Spoon, Chief, Branch of Lands and Realty. [FR Doc. E8–20965 Filed 9–9–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–JA–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Field Museum of Natural History (Field Museum), Chicago, IL, that meet the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary objects’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. The two cultural items are a rattle and a worked walrus tusk. The rattle (catalog number 78326) is carved wood with shell or glass bead PO 00000 Frm 00037 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 rattlers. It is painted with blue and red mineral paints. The body of the rattle represents an oyster catcher. The handle of the rattle is wrapped with a strip of black leather, and string is wrapped around the upper neck of the oyster catcher. It measures approximately 13 inches long and 3 inches wide. The worked walrus tusk (catalog number 78074) is comprised of four sections. Each section measures approximately 11 inches long. According to Field Museum records, the walrus tusk sections were ‘‘found in an old cave on a small Island in Icy Straits where a Shaman of the ‘Hoonah’ tribe was laid away.’’ The rattle was ‘‘believed to have come from an old grave house on the shores of Frederick Bay, near the village of ‘Gan-der-kan,’ of the ‘Hoonah tribe’.’’ At an unknown date, Lieutenant Emmons acquired the walrus tusk sections and rattle. In 1902, the Field Museum of Natural History purchased the cultural items from Lieutenant Emmons, and accessioned them into its collection that same year. The cultural affiliation of the two cultural items is Hoonah Tlingit, as indicated through museum records and consultation with representatives of the Hoonah Indian Association. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the two cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of a death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Hoonah Indian Association. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Helen Robbins, Repatriation Director, Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605, telephone (312) 665–7317, before October 10, 2008. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the Hoonah Indian Association may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Field Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes, Hoonah Indian Association, E:\FR\FM\10SEN1.SGM 10SEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 176 / Wednesday, September 10, 2008 / Notices Huna Totem Corporation, and Sealaska Heritage Foundation that this notice has been published. Dated: August 20, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–21011 Filed 9–9–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR and Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: pwalker on PROD1PC71 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the control of the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR, and in the possession of the Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, that meet the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary objects’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. In 1982, human remains of one Native American individual and funerary objects were found eroding out of a streamside terrace and mixed in adjacent back dirt piles from site 35– MW–32, also known as the Willow Creek Lake Site, in Morrow County, OR. The site is located immediately west of the confluence between Willow Creek and Balm Fork, near Heppner, OR. The human remains, cultural items, and a large concentration of butchered animal bones were first observed by an employee who was working on a nearby channeling and surface grading project related to Willow Creek Dam construction at the Willow Creek Lake Project area. It is undetermined if the human remains and cultural items came from an isolated burial or if the construction activity disturbed the edge of a larger burial ground. The human remains and cultural items were VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:52 Sep 09, 2008 Jkt 214001 assessed on-site by archeologists and personnel from the University of Idaho, Moscow, ID. The Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, then collected and transferred the human remains and cultural items for further analysis to the University of Idaho, Laboratory of Anthropology. The human remains and funerary objects were later transferred to the Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University for temporary curation until the responsible agency and repository could be identified and contacted. In 1984, the human remains were repatriated to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon and reburied in Mission, OR. The funerary objects remained at the museum. The 51 unassociated funerary objects are 1 cobble pestle handle, 4 fragments of a worked bone awl, 40 pieces of chert debitage, 1 piece of basalt debitage, 2 pressed glassware fragments, and 3 square nails. Various Native American groups were known to follow Willow Creek and Balm Fork during travels to and from the mountainous areas. Although no dates of occupation were obtained by the researchers, the burial pattern observed within 35–WS–32 is consistent with the customs of Columbia Plateau Native American groups. Ethnographic and museum records indicate that the cultural items are consistent with cultural items typically found in context with burials characteristic of the MidColumbia River Basin. Oral histories and published ethnographic documentation indicate that site 35– MW–32 is located within the traditional territory of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. In particular, some ethnographic accounts place the site area within Umatilla and Cayuse home ranges during the equestrian period. Based on provenience, officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District reasonably believe the unassociated funerary objects are culturally affiliated with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. Officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the 51 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. Officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District have also PO 00000 Frm 00038 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 52677 determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Daniel Mulligan, NAGPRA Coordinator, Environmental Resources Branch, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, P.O. Box 2946, Portland, OR 97208–2946, telephone (503) 808–4768, before October 10, 2008. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon that this notice has been published. Dated: August 18, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–21010 Filed 9–9–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Brigham Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures, Provo, UT National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in possession of the Brigham Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures, Provo, UT. The human remains were removed from Milliard County, UT. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Brigham Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures professional staff in E:\FR\FM\10SEN1.SGM 10SEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 176 (Wednesday, September 10, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 52676-52677]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-21011]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of 
Natural History, Chicago, IL

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Field Museum of 
Natural History (Field Museum), Chicago, IL, that meet the definition 
of ``unassociated funerary objects'' under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural 
items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.
    The two cultural items are a rattle and a worked walrus tusk.
    The rattle (catalog number 78326) is carved wood with shell or 
glass bead rattlers. It is painted with blue and red mineral paints. 
The body of the rattle represents an oyster catcher. The handle of the 
rattle is wrapped with a strip of black leather, and string is wrapped 
around the upper neck of the oyster catcher. It measures approximately 
13 inches long and 3 inches wide.
    The worked walrus tusk (catalog number 78074) is comprised of four 
sections. Each section measures approximately 11 inches long.
    According to Field Museum records, the walrus tusk sections were 
``found in an old cave on a small Island in Icy Straits where a Shaman 
of the `Hoonah' tribe was laid away.'' The rattle was ``believed to 
have come from an old grave house on the shores of Frederick Bay, near 
the village of `Gan-der-kan,' of the `Hoonah tribe'.''
    At an unknown date, Lieutenant Emmons acquired the walrus tusk 
sections and rattle. In 1902, the Field Museum of Natural History 
purchased the cultural items from Lieutenant Emmons, and accessioned 
them into its collection that same year.
    The cultural affiliation of the two cultural items is Hoonah 
Tlingit, as indicated through museum records and consultation with 
representatives of the Hoonah Indian Association.
    Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the two cultural items 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
a death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native 
American individual. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History 
also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the unassociated funerary objects and the Hoonah Indian 
Association.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should 
contact Helen Robbins, Repatriation Director, Field Museum of Natural 
History, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605, telephone 
(312) 665-7317, before October 10, 2008. Repatriation of the 
unassociated funerary objects to the Hoonah Indian Association may 
proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Field Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying 
the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes, Hoonah Indian 
Association,

[[Page 52677]]

Huna Totem Corporation, and Sealaska Heritage Foundation that this 
notice has been published.

    Dated: August 20, 2008
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-21011 Filed 9-9-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S