Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan Historical Center, Lansing, MI, 52678-52679 [E8-21009]

Download as PDF 52678 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 176 / Wednesday, September 10, 2008 / Notices pwalker on PROD1PC71 with NOTICES consultation with representatives of the Paiute-Shoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony, Nevada; San Juan Southern Paiute Tribe of Arizona; Summit Lake Paiute Tribe of Nevada; Walker River Paiute Tribe of the Walker River Reservation, Nevada; and Yerington Paiute Tribe of the Yerington Colony & Campbell Ranch, Nevada. At an unknown time, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from an unknown location (42MD) near Garrison, Milliard County, UT, by a private collector. In 1988, the human remains were donated by LaVon Rowley to the Museum of Peoples and Cultures (Catalog No. 1988.031.00001–00006; 1988.031.00008–00019). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Based on the general appearance and cultural features present on the surface at the time of the removal from the burial sites, the sites were determined to be Southern Paiute. The likely provenience of the human remains in Milliard County supports a Southern Paiute cultural affiliation. In addition, consultations with Southern Paiute representatives support the identification of the two individuals as Southern Paiute. Descendants of the Southern Paiute are members of the Paiute-Shoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony, Nevada; San Juan Southern Paiute Tribe of Arizona; Summit Lake Paiute Tribe of Nevada; Walker River Paiute Tribe of the Walker River Reservation, Nevada; and Yerington Paiute Tribe of the Yerington Colony & Campbell Ranch, Nevada. Officials of Brigham Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of Brigham Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Paiute-Shoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony, Nevada; San Juan Southern Paiute Tribe of Arizona; Summit Lake Paiute Tribe of Nevada; Walker River Paiute Tribe of the Walker River Reservation, Nevada; and Yerington Paiute Tribe of the Yerington Colony & Campbell Ranch, Nevada. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Paul Stavast, Brigham VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:52 Sep 09, 2008 Jkt 214001 Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures, 105 Allen Hall, Provo, UT 84602–3600, telephone (801) 422–0020, before October 10, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the PaiuteShoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony, Nevada; San Juan Southern Paiute Tribe of Arizona; Summit Lake Paiute Tribe of Nevada; Walker River Paiute Tribe of the Walker River Reservation, Nevada; and Yerington Paiute Tribe of the Yerington Colony & Campbell Ranch, Nevada may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Brigham Young University, Museum of Peoples and Cultures is responsible for notifying the Paiute-Shoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony, Nevada; San Juan Southern Paiute Tribe of Arizona; Summit Lake Paiute Tribe of Nevada; Walker River Paiute Tribe of the Walker River Reservation, Nevada; and Yerington Paiute Tribe of the Yerington Colony & Campbell Ranch, Nevada that this notice has been published. Dated: August 26, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–21008 Filed 9–9–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan Historical Center, Lansing, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of the Michigan Historical Center, Lansing, MI. The human remains were removed from Cheboygan County, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Michigan Historical Center professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan. PO 00000 Frm 00039 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 In 1992, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the Village of Mackinaw City in Cheboygan County, MI. The human remains were unearthed during a water main project on land owned by the Village of Mackinaw City, and were removed by the Mackinaw City Police. Subsequently, archeologists from the Michigan Historical Center and physical anthropologist Dr. David Barondess, of Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, were called to investigate. They identified the remaining portion of the burial pit in the trench wall, and recovered a few additional bones. After his analysis was complete, Dr. Barondess transferred the bones to the Michigan Historical Center at the request of the Village. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown time, but likely in 1992, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the Village of Mackinaw City in Cheboygan County, MI, by an unidentified employee of the company constructing the water main. The construction worker gave the human remains to a student at Kirtland Community College. In early 1993, a professor at the college transferred the human remains to the Michigan Historical Center. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. About 30 feet away from the first individual’s grave, along the water main, was a cache of artifacts of both French and Native manufacture dating to the late 17th or early 18th century. The artifacts are similar to those found at French, Odawa, and Huron/ Wyandotte sites at the Straits of Mackinac during that period. As these artifacts were not in direct association with the human remains, they are not considered to be funerary objects. Other than a few modern items and one small chert flake, no artifacts from earlier or later cultural periods were found in the vicinity, despite intensive examination by trained archeologists of the utility trench spoil dirt. There were no traces of coffin hardware or coffin wood, and no shroud pins or clothing buttons. For these reasons, the human remains most likely date to the same period as the cache pit, i.e. the late 17th or early 18th century. Both sets of human remains were identified as Native American by Dr. Barondess, who stated that their condition was consistent with being buried ‘‘several hundred years ago.’’ The ethnic identification was based on morphological attributes of the skulls and condition of the teeth. The E:\FR\FM\10SEN1.SGM 10SEN1 pwalker on PROD1PC71 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 176 / Wednesday, September 10, 2008 / Notices identification of the human remains as Native American is consistent with observed burial practices, such as a burial in a pit without evidence of a coffin, the lack of buttons or other artifacts indicative of Euro-American clothing, and morphological characteristics. Mackinaw City is located on the south side of the Straits of Mackinac. During this period, the French had missions, traders, and a military presence at the Straits. During the late 17th and early 18th century, the Odawa were known to inhabit both sides of the Straits, as documented by French missionary and military records. At this time, Huron/ Wyandotte refugees, fleeing attacks by the Iroquois, also lived on the north side of the Straits, at present day St. Ignace. The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians resided on the north side of the Straits as well. A band of Chippewa was reported at times in the Cheboygan area. Other tribes were known to pass through the area, often stopping to trade. Although the tribal affiliation of the human remains found at Mackinaw City is not scientifically certain, the remains are likely culturally affiliated with the Odawa, as they were the tribe most commonly reported in the Mackinaw City area during the period in question. The Odawa who lived at what is now Mackinaw City moved to Little Traverse Bay in the 1740s, and their descendants are members of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan, based in what is now Emmet County. The Village of Mackinaw City transferred the human remains found in the water main trench to the Michigan Historical Center with the understanding that the Center would arrange for reburial after studies were complete. The Center entered into consultation with the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians in the spring of 2008. The tribe has provided the Michigan Historical Center with documentation of their continuous presence in the Straits of Mackinac area for at least 350 years. The NAGPRA coordinators of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan and Wyandotte Nation, Oklahoma have sent the Michigan Historical Center letters of support for repatriation of the human remains removed from Mackinaw City to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan. Officials of the Michigan Historical Center have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Michigan Historical Center also have VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:52 Sep 09, 2008 Jkt 214001 determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Barbara Mead, Michigan Historical Center, P.O. Box 30740, Lansing, MI 48909–8240, telephone (517) 373–6416, before October 10, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Michigan Historical Center is responsible for notifying the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan; and Wyandotte Nation, Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: August 20, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–21009 Filed 9–9–08; 8:45 am] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging Proposed Consent Decree In accordance with Departmental Policy, 28 CFR 50.7, notice is hereby given that a proposed Consent Decree in United States of America v. Mark and Amanda St. Pierre, Civil Action No. 1:08–cv–177 (D. Vt.), was lodged with the United States District Court for the District of Vermont on September 3, 2008. This proposed Consent Decree concerns a complaint filed by the United States against Mark and Amanda St. Pierre, pursuant to sections 309(b), 309(d) and 404 of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1319(b), 1319(d) and 1344, to obtain injunctive relief from and impose civil penalties against the Defendants for violating the Clean Water Act by discharging pollutants without a permit into waters of the United States. The proposed Consent Decree resolves these allegations by requiring the Defendants to restore the impacted areas and perform mitigation and to pay a civil penalty. The Consent Decree also provides for the Defendants to perform a supplemental environmental project. The Department of Justice will accept written comments relating to this proposed Consent Decree for thirty (30) Frm 00040 Fmt 4703 days from the date of publication of this Notice. Please address comments to Joshua M. Levin, Senior Trial Attorney, U.S. Department of Justice, Environment and Natural Resources Division, Environmental Defense Section, P.O. Box 23986, Washington, DC 20026– 3986, and refer to United States of America v. Mark and Amanda St. Pierre, DJ # 90–5–1–1–17229/1. The proposed Consent Decree may be examined at the Clerk’s Office, United States District Court for the District of Vermont, Federal Bldg, 5th Floor, 11 Elmwood Avenue, Burlington, VT 05401. In addition, the proposed Consent Decree may be viewed at http://www.usdoj.gov/enrd/ Consent_Decrees.html. Scott A. Schachter, Assistant Section Chief, Environmental Defense Section, Environment and Natural Resources Division. [FR Doc. E8–20987 Filed 9–9–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4410–CW–P DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division United States v. Raycom Media, Inc.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive Impact Statement BILLING CODE 4312–50–S PO 00000 52679 Sfmt 4703 Notice is hereby given pursuant to the Antitrust Procedures and Penalties Act, 15 U.S.C. 16(b)(h), that a proposed Final Judgment, Hold Separate Stipulation and Order, and Competitive Impact Statement have been filed with the United States District Court for the District of Columbia in United States of America v. Raycom Media, Inc., Civil Action No. 1:08–cv–01510. On August 28, 2008, the United States filed a Complaint alleging that the acquisition by Raycom Media, Inc. of WWBT–TV, a Richmond, Virginia, broadcast television station, from Lincoln Financial Media Company violates section 7 of the Clayton Act, 15 U.S.C. 18. The proposed Final Judgment, filed the same time as the Complaint, requires Raycom to divest its Richmond, Virginia, broadcast television station WTVR–TV, along with certain related assets. Copies of the Complaint, proposed Final Judgment, and Competitive Impact Statement are available for inspection at the Department of Justice, Antitrust Division, Antitrust Documents Group, 450 Fifth Street, NW., Suite 1010, Washington, DC 20530 (telephone: 202– 514–2481), on the Department of Justice’s Web site (http:// www.usdoj.gov/atr), and at the Office of the Clerk of the United States District E:\FR\FM\10SEN1.SGM 10SEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 176 (Wednesday, September 10, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 52678-52679]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-21009]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan Historical Center, 
Lansing, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of the 
Michigan Historical Center, Lansing, MI. The human remains were removed 
from Cheboygan County, MI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Michigan 
Historical Center professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, 
Michigan.
    In 1992, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were removed from the Village of Mackinaw City in Cheboygan County, MI. 
The human remains were unearthed during a water main project on land 
owned by the Village of Mackinaw City, and were removed by the Mackinaw 
City Police. Subsequently, archeologists from the Michigan Historical 
Center and physical anthropologist Dr. David Barondess, of Wayne State 
University, Detroit, MI, were called to investigate. They identified 
the remaining portion of the burial pit in the trench wall, and 
recovered a few additional bones. After his analysis was complete, Dr. 
Barondess transferred the bones to the Michigan Historical Center at 
the request of the Village. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    At an unknown time, but likely in 1992, human remains representing 
a minimum of one individual were removed from the Village of Mackinaw 
City in Cheboygan County, MI, by an unidentified employee of the 
company constructing the water main. The construction worker gave the 
human remains to a student at Kirtland Community College. In early 
1993, a professor at the college transferred the human remains to the 
Michigan Historical Center. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    About 30 feet away from the first individual's grave, along the 
water main, was a cache of artifacts of both French and Native 
manufacture dating to the late 17th or early 18th century. The 
artifacts are similar to those found at French, Odawa, and Huron/
Wyandotte sites at the Straits of Mackinac during that period. As these 
artifacts were not in direct association with the human remains, they 
are not considered to be funerary objects. Other than a few modern 
items and one small chert flake, no artifacts from earlier or later 
cultural periods were found in the vicinity, despite intensive 
examination by trained archeologists of the utility trench spoil dirt. 
There were no traces of coffin hardware or coffin wood, and no shroud 
pins or clothing buttons. For these reasons, the human remains most 
likely date to the same period as the cache pit, i.e. the late 17th or 
early 18th century.
    Both sets of human remains were identified as Native American by 
Dr. Barondess, who stated that their condition was consistent with 
being buried ``several hundred years ago.'' The ethnic identification 
was based on morphological attributes of the skulls and condition of 
the teeth. The

[[Page 52679]]

identification of the human remains as Native American is consistent 
with observed burial practices, such as a burial in a pit without 
evidence of a coffin, the lack of buttons or other artifacts indicative 
of Euro-American clothing, and morphological characteristics.
    Mackinaw City is located on the south side of the Straits of 
Mackinac. During this period, the French had missions, traders, and a 
military presence at the Straits. During the late 17th and early 18th 
century, the Odawa were known to inhabit both sides of the Straits, as 
documented by French missionary and military records. At this time, 
Huron/Wyandotte refugees, fleeing attacks by the Iroquois, also lived 
on the north side of the Straits, at present day St. Ignace. The Sault 
Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians resided on the north side of the 
Straits as well. A band of Chippewa was reported at times in the 
Cheboygan area. Other tribes were known to pass through the area, often 
stopping to trade. Although the tribal affiliation of the human remains 
found at Mackinaw City is not scientifically certain, the remains are 
likely culturally affiliated with the Odawa, as they were the tribe 
most commonly reported in the Mackinaw City area during the period in 
question. The Odawa who lived at what is now Mackinaw City moved to 
Little Traverse Bay in the 1740s, and their descendants are members of 
the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan, based in what 
is now Emmet County.
    The Village of Mackinaw City transferred the human remains found in 
the water main trench to the Michigan Historical Center with the 
understanding that the Center would arrange for reburial after studies 
were complete. The Center entered into consultation with the Little 
Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians in the spring of 2008. The tribe 
has provided the Michigan Historical Center with documentation of their 
continuous presence in the Straits of Mackinac area for at least 350 
years. The NAGPRA coordinators of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of 
Chippewa Indians of Michigan and Wyandotte Nation, Oklahoma have sent 
the Michigan Historical Center letters of support for repatriation of 
the human remains removed from Mackinaw City to the Little Traverse Bay 
Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan.
    Officials of the Michigan Historical Center have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described above 
represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American 
ancestry. Officials of the Michigan Historical Center also have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the Native American human remains and the Little Traverse Bay 
Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Barbara 
Mead, Michigan Historical Center, P.O. Box 30740, Lansing, MI 48909-
8240, telephone (517) 373-6416, before October 10, 2008. Repatriation 
of the human remains to the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, 
Michigan may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come 
forward.
    The Michigan Historical Center is responsible for notifying the 
Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie 
Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan; and Wyandotte Nation, Oklahoma 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: August 20, 2008
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-21009 Filed 9-9-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S