Notice of Inventory Completion: Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, St. Paul and Bemidji, MN, 50993-50994 [E8-20093]

Download as PDF mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 169 / Friday, August 29, 2008 / Notices Washington; Port Gamble Indian Community of the Port Gamble Reservation, Washington; Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington; Quileute Tribe of the Quileute Reservation, Washington; Quinault Tribe of the Quinault Reservation, Washington; Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe of Washington; Shoalwater Bay Tribe of the Shoalwater Bay Indian Reservation, Washington; Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington; Snoqualmie Tribe, Washington; Squaxin Island Tribe of the Squaxin Island Reservation, Washington; Stillaguamish Tribe of Washington; Suquamish Indian Tribe of the Port Madison Reservation, Washington; Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, Washington; Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington; and Upper Skagit Indian Tribe of Washington. At an unknown time, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from Lopez and Decatur Islands in San Juan County, WA. The human remains came into the Horner Collection at an unknown time, but are described in an inventory report conducted in the early 1970s. The human remains were located in Oregon State University’s Anthropology Department during an inventory in 2006. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Both individuals appear to be part of the Ethan Allen Collection, as ‘‘Ethan Allen Collection’’ is written on each skull. The Ethan Allen Collection had been on loan to the Horner Collection sometime in the past. Ethan Allen was known to collect Native American artifacts from all over the Puget Sound area, including the San Juan Islands. Additional writing appears on both skulls. One individual has ‘‘Decatur Island, Puget Sound’’ and the other ‘‘Lopez Island, Puget Sound.’’ Osteologist professionals of the Anthropology Department at Oregon State University have determined that both skulls are of Native American ancestry. Traditional territory for the Samish Indian Tribe includes Samish Island, Guemes Island, eastern Lopez Island, Cypress Island, and Fidalgo Island. Both Lopez and Decatur Islands are within Samish traditional territory and continue to be used by the Samish Indian Tribe, Washington. Officials of the Horner Collection, Oregon State University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:32 Aug 28, 2008 Jkt 214001 Horner Collection, Oregon State University also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Samish Indian Tribe, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President’s Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration Building, Corvallis, OR 97331, telephone (541) 737–8260, before September 29, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Samish Indian Tribe, Washington may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Horner Collection, Oregon State University is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; Cowlitz Indian Tribe, Washington; Hoh Indian Tribe of the Hoh Indian Reservation, Washington; Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe of Washington; Lower Elwha Tribal Community of the Lower Elwha Reservation, Washington; Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation, Washington; Makah Indian Tribe of the Makah Indian Reservation, Washington; Muckleshoot Indian Tribe of the Muckleshoot Reservation, Washington; Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho; Nisqually Indian Tribe of the Nisqually Reservation, Washington; Nooksack Indian Tribe of Washington; Port Gamble Indian Community of the Port Gamble Reservation, Washington; Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington; Quileute Tribe of the Quileute Reservation, Washington; Quinault Tribe of the Quinault Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian Tribe, Washington; SaukSuiattle Indian Tribe of Washington; Shoalwater Bay Tribe of the Shoalwater Bay Indian Reservation, Washington; Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington; Snoqualmie Tribe, Washington; Squaxin Island Tribe of the Squaxin Island Reservation, Washington; Stillaguamish Tribe of Washington; Suquamish Indian Tribe of the Port Madison Reservation, Washington; Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, Washington; Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington; and Upper Skagit Indian Tribe of Washington that this notice has been published. PO 00000 Frm 00069 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 50993 Dated: July 28, 2008. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–20099 Filed 8–28–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, St. Paul and Bemidji, MN National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary object in the possession of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, St. Paul and Bemidji, MN. The human remains and associated funerary object were removed from Faribault and Goodhue Counties, MN. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Minnesota Indian Affairs Council professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, and OtoeMissouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. In 1935, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from a mound on the Cady Farm (21GD17), Goodhue County, MN, by Edward Schmidt, an avocational archeologist. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Site records in the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist record a minimum of 226 mounds at the Cady Farm site, and suggest an Oneota cultural affiliation. Based on continuities of material culture, historical documents, and oral history, the Oneota phase of the Mississippian archeological culture has been determined to be ancestral to the present-day Otoe and Ioway. At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one E:\FR\FM\29AUN1.SGM 29AUN1 mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES 50994 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 169 / Friday, August 29, 2008 / Notices individual were removed from the Bartron farm (21GD2), near Red Wing, Goodhue County, MN, by Edward Schmidt, an avocational archeologist No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Site records in the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist indicate that the Bartron Site is a village site of Oneota cultural affiliation. Based on continuities of material culture, historical documents, and oral history, the Oneota phase of the Mississippian archeological culture has been determined to be ancestral to the present-day Otoe and Ioway. In 1960–62, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals were removed from the Fort Sweney site (21GD86), Goodhue County, MN, during archeological excavations conducted by the Science Museum of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Site records in the Minnesota office of the State Archaeologist indicate that Fort Sweney is a multi-component cemetery and habitation site with Late Woodland and Oneota components. The mortuary styles of the burials excavated in 1960–62 indicate that they are associated with the Oneota component of the site. Based on continuities of material culture, historical documents, and oral history, the Oneota phase of the Mississippian archeological culture has been determined to be ancestral to the present-day Otoe and Ioway. In 1998, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from the Vosburg site (21FA2), Faribault County, MN, during archeological excavations conducted by the University of Minnesota. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a segment of rib from a large mammal. Site records in the Minnesota office of the State Archaeologist indicate that the Vosburg site is a cemetery and habitation site classified as belonging to the Blue Earth/Oneota phase. Based on continuities of material culture, historical documents, and oral history, the Oneota phase of the Mississippian archeological culture has been determined to be ancestral to the present-day Otoe and Ioway. Descendants of the Otoe and Ioway are members of the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, and Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. Officials of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 10 VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:32 Aug 28, 2008 Jkt 214001 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the one object described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary object and the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, and Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary object should contact James L. (Jim) Jones, Jr., Cultural Resource Director, Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, 3801 Bemidji Avenue North, Suite 5, Bemidji, MN 56601, telephone (218) 755–3223, before September 29, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary object to the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, and Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Minnesota Indian Affairs Council is responsible for notifying the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, and Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: August 4, 2008. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–20093 Filed 8–28–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, PO 00000 Frm 00070 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Siskiyou County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administration responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. An assessment of documents associated with the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by professional staff of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon; and Quartz Valley Indian Community of the Quartz Valley Reservation of California. In 1955, human remains representing a minimum of 21 individuals were removed from CA-Sis–262 (also known as the Foster site), a site located along Bogus Creek in Siskiyou County, CA, by J. Foster, the landowner, and J.A. Bennyhoff and A.B. Elsasser of the University of California Archaeological Survey. The human remains and associated funerary objects were accessioned into the museum later that same year (Accession UCAS–357). No known individuals were identified. The 31,970 associated funerary objects are 4 lots of animal bones (including horse and dog burials); 3 arrow points; 1 fragment of baked clay; 2 bangles; 55 basketry fragments; 31,246 beads (approximate count); 73 bells; 1 belt fragment; 3 blades; 13 bracelets; 2 buckles; 226 buttons; 100 charcoal fragments (approximate count); 2 china fragments; 1 obsidian flake; 2 clappers; 32 cloth fragments; 12 cordage fragments; 1 glass fragment; 2 handles; 1 harness; 2 hatched handles; 2 hooks; 5 iron fragments; 1 lead or pewter fragment; 1 piece of leather; 2 nail fragments; 65 pendants; 2 pestles; 1 pipe fragment; 2 porcelain fragments; 2 pots; 1 rivet; 1 rod; 1 scissors fragment; 1 screw; 1 sheat; 1 shell fragment; 2 sherds; 1 shoe sole; 2 shots; 1 spool; 3 spoon fragments; 21 animal teeth; 66 thimbles; and 1 wire fragment. CA-Sis–262 was an historic cemetery located on the west bank of Bogus Creek, a tributary of the Klamath River, about 1 mile south of Foster’s Ranch. The site was destroyed during the process of diverting Bogus Creek from its original course between May 7 and E:\FR\FM\29AUN1.SGM 29AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 169 (Friday, August 29, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 50993-50994]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-20093]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, 
St. Paul and Bemidji, MN

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
object in the possession of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, St. 
Paul and Bemidji, MN. The human remains and associated funerary object 
were removed from Faribault and Goodhue Counties, MN.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Minnesota 
Indian Affairs Council professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of 
Oklahoma, and Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma.
    In 1935, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were removed from a mound on the Cady Farm (21GD17), Goodhue County, 
MN, by Edward Schmidt, an avocational archeologist. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Site records in the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist 
record a minimum of 226 mounds at the Cady Farm site, and suggest an 
Oneota cultural affiliation. Based on continuities of material culture, 
historical documents, and oral history, the Oneota phase of the 
Mississippian archeological culture has been determined to be ancestral 
to the present-day Otoe and Ioway.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one

[[Page 50994]]

individual were removed from the Bartron farm (21GD2), near Red Wing, 
Goodhue County, MN, by Edward Schmidt, an avocational archeologist No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Site records in the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist 
indicate that the Bartron Site is a village site of Oneota cultural 
affiliation. Based on continuities of material culture, historical 
documents, and oral history, the Oneota phase of the Mississippian 
archeological culture has been determined to be ancestral to the 
present-day Otoe and Ioway.
    In 1960-62, human remains representing a minimum of five 
individuals were removed from the Fort Sweney site (21GD86), Goodhue 
County, MN, during archeological excavations conducted by the Science 
Museum of Minnesota. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Site records in the Minnesota office of the State Archaeologist 
indicate that Fort Sweney is a multi-component cemetery and habitation 
site with Late Woodland and Oneota components. The mortuary styles of 
the burials excavated in 1960-62 indicate that they are associated with 
the Oneota component of the site. Based on continuities of material 
culture, historical documents, and oral history, the Oneota phase of 
the Mississippian archeological culture has been determined to be 
ancestral to the present-day Otoe and Ioway.
    In 1998, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were removed from the Vosburg site (21FA2), Faribault County, MN, 
during archeological excavations conducted by the University of 
Minnesota. No known individual was identified. The one associated 
funerary object is a segment of rib from a large mammal.
    Site records in the Minnesota office of the State Archaeologist 
indicate that the Vosburg site is a cemetery and habitation site 
classified as belonging to the Blue Earth/Oneota phase. Based on 
continuities of material culture, historical documents, and oral 
history, the Oneota phase of the Mississippian archeological culture 
has been determined to be ancestral to the present-day Otoe and Ioway. 
Descendants of the Otoe and Ioway are members of the Iowa Tribe of 
Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, and Otoe-Missouria Tribe 
of Indians, Oklahoma.
    Officials of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of 10 individuals of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council 
also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the one 
object described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with 
or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part 
of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Minnesota 
Indian Affairs Council have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 
(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be 
reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary object and the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, 
Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, and Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
object should contact James L. (Jim) Jones, Jr., Cultural Resource 
Director, Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, 3801 Bemidji Avenue North, 
Suite 5, Bemidji, MN 56601, telephone (218) 755-3223, before September 
29, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary 
object to the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of 
Oklahoma, and Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma may proceed 
after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Minnesota Indian Affairs Council is responsible for notifying 
the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, and 
Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: August 4, 2008.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-20093 Filed 8-28-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S