Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: McWane Science Center, Birmingham, AL, 49482-49483 [E8-19323]

Download as PDF mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES 49482 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 163 / Thursday, August 21, 2008 / Notices In 1916, a shot glass was ‘‘found in an Indian grave at Westport,’’ Clatsop County, OR, probably by Miss Frida Flood who gifted the cultural item to the Horner Collection in 1929. Museum records clearly state this object was taken from a grave, but there is no indication that the remains were exhumed. Officials of the Horner Collection, Oregon State University reasonably believe this item is an unassociated funerary object. Westport is in Clatsop County, OR, which is in the traditional territory of the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon. The Clatsop, Nehalem, Tillamook, Nestucca, Neachesna (Salmon River Tillamook), and Siletz Band of Tillamook were all parties to the 1855 Coast Treaty. The treaty was never ratified and the northern Oregon coastal bands were not forced to remove to the Siletz Reservation as stipulated in the treaty. The Grand Ronde Indian Agent, in 1872, includes the Clatsop as one of the tribes living on the Grand Ronde Reservation. Officials of the Horner Collection, Oregon State University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the 63 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. Officials of the Horner Collection, Oregon State University also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon. Officials of the Horner Collection, Oregon State University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(D), 13 of the cultural items described above have ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. Officials of the Horner Collection, Oregon State University also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the objects of cultural patrimony and the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the objects of cultural patrimony and/or unassociated funerary VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:48 Aug 20, 2008 Jkt 214001 objects should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President’s Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration Building, Corvallis, OR 97331, telephone (541) 737–8260, before September 22, 2008. Repatriation of the objects of cultural patrimony and unassociated funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Horner Collection, Oregon State University is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon and Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon that this notice has been published. Dated: July 14, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–19332 Filed 8–20–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: McWane Science Center, Birmingham, AL National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the McWane Science Center, Birmingham, AL, that meet the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary objects’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. In the early 1900s, cultural items were removed from the Carden Bottoms site (3YE14) in Yell County, AR. Between 1979 and 1985, G.E. Pilquist, a collector from Dardanelle, AR, donated the cultural items to the Red Mountain Museum, Birmingham, AL. In 1994, the Red Mountain Museum merged with the Discovery Place under the name, Discovery 2000 Inc., and now operates as McWane Science Center. The cultural items are recorded as having been PO 00000 Frm 00077 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 recovered from a grave. The five unassociated funerary objects are four stone beads and one blue glass bead. According to oral evidence of the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, cultural items of personal adornment were placed with an individual at the time of death or as a part of the death rite or ceremony. Funerary objects associated with the human remains removed from the Carden Bottoms site have been determined to date to the early historic period. The human remains and associated funerary objects may be a late component of the Carden Bottoms complex, common along the Lower Arkansas River, including Yell County. The human remains and associated funerary objects that are also recorded as being removed from the Carden Bottoms site are described in an accompanying Notice of Inventory Completion. Oral history evidence presented by representatives of the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma indicates that the region has long been included in the traditional territory of the Quapaw. The Quapaw Tribe dominated that area when sustained European occupation of the lower Arkansas River began in the mid to late 1600s. In 1818, the Quapaw ceded the area south of the Arkansas River, including what is now Yell County, to the United States. Officials of the McWane Science Center have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the five cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. Officials of the McWane Science Center also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Jun Ebersole, Collections Manager, McWane Science Center, 200 19th St. N, Birmingham, AL 35203, telephone (205) 714–8347, before September 22, 2008. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The McWane Science Center is responsible for notifying the Quapaw E:\FR\FM\21AUN1.SGM 21AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 163 / Thursday, August 21, 2008 / Notices Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: July 14, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–19323 Filed 8–20–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department, Little Rock, AR National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department, Little Rock, AR. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Poinsett County, AR. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department professional staff with assistance from the University of Missouri in Columbia, MO, and in consultation with representatives of the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. In 1988, human remains representing a minimum of 15 individuals were removed from the Priestly site (3PO490) in Poinsett County, AR, by the Center for Archaeological Research, Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield, MO. The human remains were sent to the University of Missouri, Columbia for analysis and curation. The human remains were transferred to the Arkansas Highway and Transportation in June 2004. No known individuals were identified. The 46 associated funerary objects are 2 Lander points, 1 Gary point, 42 plain shell-tempered body sherds, and 1 plain shell-tempered sherd from the rim of a bowl. Archeological evidence indicates the human remains are Native American VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:48 Aug 20, 2008 Jkt 214001 and are considered to be from an Emergent Mississippian culture. Judging from the context and radio-carbon dates obtained from various features at the site, the main component at the site and the human remains are thought to date between A.D. 750 to 1100. Oral history evidence presented by representatives of the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma indicates that the region has long been included in the traditional and hunting territory of the Quapaw. French colonial records from the 1700s also indicate that at that time, the Quapaw were the only Native American group present in the St. Frances River valley where the Priestly site is located. Based on geographical location, historical documents, and oral history, the human remains are most likely associated with the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. Officials of the Arkansas Highway and Transportation have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of at least 15 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Arkansas Highway and Transportation also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 46 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Arkansas Highway and Transportation have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Diana Wilks, Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department, P.O. Box 2261, Little Rock, AR 72203, telephone (501) 569–2038, before September 22, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department is responsible for notifying the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: July 28, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–19314 Filed 8–20–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S PO 00000 Frm 00078 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 49483 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Horner Collection, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the Horner Collection, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR. The human remains were removed from an unknown location in Hawai‘i. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Horner Collection, Oregon State University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Hawai‘i. The Alapa ‘I Hanapi, Hawai‘i Island Burial Council, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai‘i Nei, Kauai/Niihau Island Burial Council, Maui/Lanai Island Burial Council, Molokai Island Burial Council, O’ahu Burial Committee, and Van Horn Diamond ‘Ohana were notified, but did not participate in consultations concerning the human remains. At an unknown time by an unknown donor, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were accessioned into the Horner Collection. This skull came into the Horner Collection at an unknown time, but is accounted for in an inventory report of the Oregon State University’s Osteology Collection, located in the Anthropology Department, in 1976. Notations taken at the time identify the skull as ‘‘Hawaii.’’ No additional information on provenience is available. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Osteologist professionals of the Anthropology Department at Oregon State University have determined that the skull is possibly of Native Hawaiian ancestry. Officials of the Horner Collection, Oregon State University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains E:\FR\FM\21AUN1.SGM 21AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 163 (Thursday, August 21, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 49482-49483]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-19323]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: McWane Science 
Center, Birmingham, AL

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the McWane Science 
Center, Birmingham, AL, that meet the definition of ``unassociated 
funerary objects'' under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural 
items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.
    In the early 1900s, cultural items were removed from the Carden 
Bottoms site (3YE14) in Yell County, AR. Between 1979 and 1985, G.E. 
Pilquist, a collector from Dardanelle, AR, donated the cultural items 
to the Red Mountain Museum, Birmingham, AL. In 1994, the Red Mountain 
Museum merged with the Discovery Place under the name, Discovery 2000 
Inc., and now operates as McWane Science Center. The cultural items are 
recorded as having been recovered from a grave. The five unassociated 
funerary objects are four stone beads and one blue glass bead.
    According to oral evidence of the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, cultural 
items of personal adornment were placed with an individual at the time 
of death or as a part of the death rite or ceremony. Funerary objects 
associated with the human remains removed from the Carden Bottoms site 
have been determined to date to the early historic period. The human 
remains and associated funerary objects may be a late component of the 
Carden Bottoms complex, common along the Lower Arkansas River, 
including Yell County. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects that are also recorded as being removed from the Carden Bottoms 
site are described in an accompanying Notice of Inventory Completion. 
Oral history evidence presented by representatives of the Quapaw Tribe 
of Indians, Oklahoma indicates that the region has long been included 
in the traditional territory of the Quapaw. The Quapaw Tribe dominated 
that area when sustained European occupation of the lower Arkansas 
River began in the mid to late 1600s. In 1818, the Quapaw ceded the 
area south of the Arkansas River, including what is now Yell County, to 
the United States.
    Officials of the McWane Science Center have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the five cultural items described 
above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native 
American individual. Officials of the McWane Science Center also have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the unassociated funerary objects and the Quapaw Tribe of 
Indians, Oklahoma.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should 
contact Jun Ebersole, Collections Manager, McWane Science Center, 200 
19th St. N, Birmingham, AL 35203, telephone (205) 714-8347, before 
September 22, 2008. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects 
to the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma may proceed after that date if 
no additional claimants come forward.
    The McWane Science Center is responsible for notifying the Quapaw

[[Page 49483]]

Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma that this notice has been published.

    Dated: July 14, 2008
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-19323 Filed 8-20-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S