Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA; Correction, 49484-49485 [E8-19308]

Download as PDF 49484 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 163 / Thursday, August 21, 2008 / Notices described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native Hawaiian ancestry. Officials of the Horner Collection, Oregon State University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native Hawaiian human remains and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Representatives of any other Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian Organization that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President’s Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration Building, Corvallis, OR 97331, telephone (541) 737–8260, before September 22, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Office of Hawaiian Affairs may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Horner Collection, Oregon State University is responsible for notifying the Alapa ‘I Hanapi, Hawai‘i Island Burial Council, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai‘i Nei, Kauai/Niihau Island Burial Council, Maui/Lanai Island Burial Council, Molokai Island Burial Council, O’ahu Burial Committee, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and Van Horn Diamond ‘Ohana that this notice has been published. Dated: July 14, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–19310 Filed 8–20–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: McWane Science Center, Birmingham, AL National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the McWane Science Center, Birmingham, AL. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Yell County, AR. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:48 Aug 20, 2008 Jkt 214001 in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the McWane Science Center’s professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. In the early 1900s, human remain representing the minimum of one individual were removed from the Carden Bottoms site (3YE14) in Yell County, AR. Sometime between 1979 and 1985, G.E. Pilquist, a collector from Dardanelle, AR, donated the human remains to the Red Mountain Museum, Birmingham, AL. In 1994, the Red Mountain Museum merged with the Discovery Place under the name Discovery 2000 Inc., and now operates as McWane Science Center. No known individual was identified. The five associated funerary objects are three stone beads, one small copper bracelet, and one metal cone. Museum records state that the human remains were recovered from a grave. Diagnostic artifacts indicate that the human remains were probably buried after European contact. Physical examination reveals the skeletal remains to be those of a child, and burial context associates the human remains with Native American populations. Archeological evidence indicates a continuity of the site from A.D. 1350 into the early historic period. The human remains and associated funerary objects may be a late component of the Carden Bottoms complex, common along the Lower Arkansas River, including Yell County. The Quapaw Tribe dominated that area when sustained European occupation of the lower Arkansas River began in the mid to late 1600s. In 1818, the Quapaw ceded the area south of the Arkansas River, including what is now Yell County, to the United States. Based on the geographic evidence and the date attributed to the human remains, the human remains are most likely culturally affiliated to the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. In addition, the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma has previously repatriated human remains from the Carden Bottoms site (3YE14). Unassociated funerary objects removed from the Carden Bottoms site are described in an accompanying Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items. Officials of McWane Science Center have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of McWane Science Center also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the five objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. Lastly, officials of McWane Science Center have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Jun Ebersole, Collections Manager, McWane Science Center, 200 19th St. N, Birmingham, AL 35203, telephone (205) 714–8347, before September 22, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The McWane Science Center is responsible for notifying the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: July 14, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–19320 Filed 8–20–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Grays Harbor County, WA. E:\FR\FM\21AUN1.SGM 21AUN1 mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 163 / Thursday, August 21, 2008 / Notices This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, Washington. This notice is an addition to the minimum number of individuals removed from the Minard site (45–GH– 15) in Grays Harbor County, WA, which were previously described in a Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register of May 17, 2007 (FR Doc. E7–9455, pages 27845–27846). In January of 2008, Dr. Lourdes DeLeon, a physical anthropologist at Central Washington University, prepared a description of a number of sets of human remains known as the ‘‘Former Teaching Collection at Washington State University.’’ During the course of this work she identified the remains of two individuals who, based on the color of the bone, were believed to have been buried in a shell midden. Examination of photographs taken during the burial excavations done at the Minard site indicated that these were human remains formerly determined to be missing from the Minard collection. In the Federal Register notice of May 17, 2007, paragraph 4 is corrected by substituting the following paragraphs: In 1969 and 1970, human remains representing a minimum of 11 individuals were removed from the Minard site (45–GH–15) in Grays Harbor County, WA, by Richard Daugherty, an employee, and Tom E. Roll, a graduate student, of Washington State University. The excavations were conducted under research funds allocated by the Washington State Legislature. No known individuals were identified. The 82 associated funerary objects are 2 nipple topped mauls, 1 ground slate knife, 1 ground stone club, 1 necklace of rolled copped and dentalium section beads, 1 straight adze with a whale bone handle and metal blade, 1 knife or small adze-chisel with a bone handle and metal blade, 1 metal chisel, 1 metal awl, 1 lot of metal fragments from wood working tools, 5 lots of nails, 2 lots of glass beads, 2 lots of tin can fragments, 5 lots of unidentified metal fragments, 2 spoons, 3 lots of wood fragments, 14 VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:48 Aug 20, 2008 Jkt 214001 thimbles on a string, 1 lot of unidentified plant material, and 38 lots of dishes and dish fragments. In the Federal Register notice of May 17, 2007, paragraph 6 is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: Officials of the Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 11 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 82 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary items should contact Mary Collins, Director of the Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University, P.O. Box 62291, Pullman, WA 99164–4910, telephone (509) 335–4314, before September 22, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, Washington may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, Washington that this notice has been published. Dated: July 28, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–19308 Filed 8–20–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 49485 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, San Juan National Forest, Durango, CO, and University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, San Juan National Forest, Durango, CO, and in the possession of the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO. The human remains were removed from Dolores County, CO. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. This notice corrects the Notice of Inventory Completion published by the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology in the Federal Register of October 9, 2001, (FR Doc. 01–25140; pages 51472–51474). This notice corrects the controller of the human remains, per 43 CFR 10.2 (a)(3)(ii), and the cultural affiliation of the human remains, per 43 CFR 10.14 (c), of one individual (catalog numbers DU6015 and DU 6066). After publication, a review of the records associated with the human remains indicated that the human remains had been removed from lands administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, San Juan National Forest, Durango, CO. Therefore, the San Juan National Forest has the control of the human remains for the purposes of NAGPRA. An overall evaluation of the totality of the circumstances and evidence pertaining to the human remains by the officials of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, San Juan National Forest indicate that no cultural affiliation can be determined by the preponderance of the evidence. Therefore, the human remains have been determined to be culturally unidentifiable. E:\FR\FM\21AUN1.SGM 21AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 163 (Thursday, August 21, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 49484-49485]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-19308]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology, 
Washington State University, Pullman, WA; Correction

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice; correction.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the Museum of Anthropology, Washington 
State University, Pullman, WA. The human remains and associated 
funerary objects were removed from Grays Harbor County, WA.

[[Page 49485]]

    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Museum 
of Anthropology, Washington State University professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the 
Chehalis Reservation, Washington.
    This notice is an addition to the minimum number of individuals 
removed from the Minard site (45-GH-15) in Grays Harbor County, WA, 
which were previously described in a Notice of Inventory Completion 
published in the Federal Register of May 17, 2007 (FR Doc. E7-9455, 
pages 27845-27846). In January of 2008, Dr. Lourdes DeLeon, a physical 
anthropologist at Central Washington University, prepared a description 
of a number of sets of human remains known as the ``Former Teaching 
Collection at Washington State University.'' During the course of this 
work she identified the remains of two individuals who, based on the 
color of the bone, were believed to have been buried in a shell midden. 
Examination of photographs taken during the burial excavations done at 
the Minard site indicated that these were human remains formerly 
determined to be missing from the Minard collection.
    In the Federal Register notice of May 17, 2007, paragraph 4 is 
corrected by substituting the following paragraphs:
    In 1969 and 1970, human remains representing a minimum of 11 
individuals were removed from the Minard site (45-GH-15) in Grays 
Harbor County, WA, by Richard Daugherty, an employee, and Tom E. Roll, 
a graduate student, of Washington State University. The excavations 
were conducted under research funds allocated by the Washington State 
Legislature. No known individuals were identified. The 82 associated 
funerary objects are 2 nipple topped mauls, 1 ground slate knife, 1 
ground stone club, 1 necklace of rolled copped and dentalium section 
beads, 1 straight adze with a whale bone handle and metal blade, 1 
knife or small adze-chisel with a bone handle and metal blade, 1 metal 
chisel, 1 metal awl, 1 lot of metal fragments from wood working tools, 
5 lots of nails, 2 lots of glass beads, 2 lots of tin can fragments, 5 
lots of unidentified metal fragments, 2 spoons, 3 lots of wood 
fragments, 14 thimbles on a string, 1 lot of unidentified plant 
material, and 38 lots of dishes and dish fragments.
    In the Federal Register notice of May 17, 2007, paragraph 6 is 
corrected by substituting the following paragraph:
    Officials of the Museum of Anthropology, Washington State 
University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the 
human remains described above represent the physical remains of 11 
individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Museum of 
Anthropology, Washington State University also have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 82 objects described above are 
reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human 
remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or 
ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Museum of Anthropology, Washington 
State University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), 
there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably 
traced between the Native American human remains and associated 
funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis 
Reservation, Washington.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
items should contact Mary Collins, Director of the Museum of 
Anthropology, Washington State University, P.O. Box 62291, Pullman, WA 
99164-4910, telephone (509) 335-4314, before September 22, 2008. 
Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to 
the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation, Washington may 
proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University is 
responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis 
Reservation, Washington that this notice has been published.

    Dated: July 28, 2008
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-19308 Filed 8-20-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S