Notice of Inventory Completion: Kingman Museum, Incorporated, Battle Creek, MI, 47230-47231 [E8-18690]

Download as PDF 47230 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; and Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan. A June 6, 2008, letter on behalf of the Secretary of the Interior from the Designated Federal Official transmitted the authorization for the museum to effect disposition of the human remains of the five culturally unidentifiable individuals to the four Indian tribes listed above contingent on the publication of a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register. This notice fulfills that requirement. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Teresa Kreutzer-Hodson, Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History, PO Box 1286, Hastings, NE 68902, telephone (402) 461–2399, before September 12, 2008. Disposition of the human remains to the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; and Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Hastings Museum is responsible for notifying the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; and Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan that this notice has been published. Dated: July 22, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18688 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Hastings, NE National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History (Hastings Museum), Hastings, NE. The human remains were VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:17 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 removed from Calico Rock, Izard County, AR. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Hastings Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Osage Nation, Oklahoma (formerly the Osage Tribe). On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from Calico Rock in Izard County, AR. No additional site information is available. The human remains were purchased by the Hastings Museum from H.L. Talbert and accessioned into the collection in 1941 (20276, 20277). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Information provided from the Arkansas Archeological Survey indicates that there are two known sites in Izard County by the name of Calico Rock. One site is an archaic site while the other is undetermined. Neither site yielded human remains, but the sites were identified after the human remains were donated to the Hastings Museum. However, the history of the town named Calico Rock, also located in Izard County, stated that a flood in 1927 unearthed an American Indian burial ground near the town site. It is likely that the human remains in the Hastings Museum collection are not from the known sites, but rather from the area of the town of Calico Rock. The human remains have been determined to be those of Native American descent. In addition, a morphological report provided on the human remains determined that the dental attrition was not consistent with an individual from the archaic time period making the likelihood of them coming from the area of the town more likely. The Osage were seminomadic people who lived and hunted in Southwestern Missouri, northwestern Arkansas, southeast Kansas, and northeast Oklahoma. Izard County is located in Osage treaty land, which was determined in 1825. Officials of the Hastings Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Hastings Museum have determined that, PO 00000 Frm 00105 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Osage Nation, Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Teresa Kreutzer-Hodson, Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History, PO Box 1286, Hastings, NE 68902, telephone (402) 461–2399, before September 12, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Osage Nation, Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Hastings Museum is responsible for notifying the Osage Nation, Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: July 22, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18695 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Kingman Museum, Incorporated, Battle Creek, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Kingman Museum, Incorporated, Battle Creek, MI. The human remains were removed from Muskegon County, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Kingman Museum, Incorporated professional staff in consultation with representatives from the Michigan Anishnaabek Cultural Preservation and Repatriation Alliance (MACPRA), a non-federally recognized Indian group. The Kingman Museum, Incorporated professional staff also consulted with representatives of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1 ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan. In 1918, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals were removed from a sand mound near Muskegon, Muskegon County, MI, by J. Howard Baker, Mrs. Blanche McFarland, and Lewis Kelly. The human remains were donated to the Battle Creek Public Schools prior to 1997. In 2006, Battle Creek Public Schools transferred the human remains to the newly formed Kingman Museum, Incorporated, a 501(c)3 charitable organization. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. A handwritten piece of paper found with the human remains gives information on the excavation. The mound measured 14 inches by 25 inches and stood about 3 feet above ground level. The human remains were found in a sitting position. While as many as eight individuals may have originally been in the mound, only four individuals were collected. Funerary objects may also have been collected, but were not given to the museum. The human remains were documented by Janet Gardner and Robert Anemone, Department of Anthropology, Western Michigan University. The documentation concluded that the physical characteristics of the human remains and the details of the burial context are indicative of a Native American population. However, a relationship of shared group identity between the human remains and a present-day Indian Tribe could not be reasonably determined. Officials of Kingman Museum, Incorporated have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of four individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of Kingman Museum, Incorporated also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and any present-day Indian Tribe. The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee (Review Committee) is responsible for recommending specific actions for disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains. In 2008, Kingman Museum, Incorporated requested that the Review Committee VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:38 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 recommend disposition of the four culturally unidentifiable individuals to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan, as the aboriginal occupants of the lands encompassing Muskegon, Muskegon County. The Review Committee considered the request at its May 15–16, 2008 meeting and recommended disposition of the human remains to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan. A June 6, 2008, letter on behalf of the Secretary of the Interior from the Designated Federal Official, transmitted the authorization for the museum to effect disposition of the human remains of the culturally unidentifiable individuals to the three Indians tribes listed above contingent on the publication of a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register. This notice fulfills that requirement. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Katie Nelson, Collection Manager, Kingman Museum, Incorporated, 175 Limit Street, Battle Creek, MI 49037, telephone (269) 965– 5117, fax (269) 965–3330, before September 12, 2008. Disposition of the human remains to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Kingman Museum, Incorporated is responsible for notifying the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan that this notice has been published. Dated: July 22, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18690 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S PO 00000 Frm 00106 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 47231 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Northwest Museum, Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of Northwest Museum, Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Umatilla County, OR, and Benton and Walla Walla Counties, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by Northwest Museum, Whitman College professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. In 1929, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from near the junction of the north and south forks of the Walla Walla River, Umatilla County, OR, by Mr. Demaris and donated to the Northwest Museum, formerly Maxey Museum, on March 31, 1929 (Accn. #5563, Cat. #WHIT-X–0014). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. A village and fishing site of the Longhair Band of the Weyiiletpuu was located at Nushnu-pa, at this location on the Walla Walla River. Today, the Weyiiletpuu, or Cayuse Tribe, are a part of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. The Cayuse traditionally lived within the Walla Walla-Milton-Freewater area and the drainages of the Walla Walla River, which is within the ceded lands of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. In 1949, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were removed from Plymouth, Site #21, ‘‘150 yards north of the ferry landing,’’ E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 157 (Wednesday, August 13, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 47230-47231]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-18690]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Kingman Museum, Incorporated, 
Battle Creek, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
Kingman Museum, Incorporated, Battle Creek, MI. The human remains were 
removed from Muskegon County, MI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Kingman 
Museum, Incorporated professional staff in consultation with 
representatives from the Michigan Anishnaabek Cultural Preservation and 
Repatriation Alliance (MACPRA), a non-federally recognized Indian 
group. The Kingman Museum, Incorporated professional staff also 
consulted with representatives of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and

[[Page 47231]]

Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, 
Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Pokagon 
Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Saginaw Chippewa 
Indian Tribe of Michigan.
    In 1918, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals 
were removed from a sand mound near Muskegon, Muskegon County, MI, by 
J. Howard Baker, Mrs. Blanche McFarland, and Lewis Kelly. The human 
remains were donated to the Battle Creek Public Schools prior to 1997. 
In 2006, Battle Creek Public Schools transferred the human remains to 
the newly formed Kingman Museum, Incorporated, a 501(c)3 charitable 
organization. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    A handwritten piece of paper found with the human remains gives 
information on the excavation. The mound measured 14 inches by 25 
inches and stood about 3 feet above ground level. The human remains 
were found in a sitting position. While as many as eight individuals 
may have originally been in the mound, only four individuals were 
collected. Funerary objects may also have been collected, but were not 
given to the museum.
    The human remains were documented by Janet Gardner and Robert 
Anemone, Department of Anthropology, Western Michigan University. The 
documentation concluded that the physical characteristics of the human 
remains and the details of the burial context are indicative of a 
Native American population. However, a relationship of shared group 
identity between the human remains and a present-day Indian Tribe could 
not be reasonably determined.
    Officials of Kingman Museum, Incorporated have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described above 
represent the physical remains of four individuals of Native American 
ancestry. Officials of Kingman Museum, Incorporated also have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), a relationship of 
shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and any present-day Indian Tribe.
    The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review 
Committee (Review Committee) is responsible for recommending specific 
actions for disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains. In 
2008, Kingman Museum, Incorporated requested that the Review Committee 
recommend disposition of the four culturally unidentifiable individuals 
to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Pokagon 
Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Saginaw Chippewa 
Indian Tribe of Michigan, as the aboriginal occupants of the lands 
encompassing Muskegon, Muskegon County.
    The Review Committee considered the request at its May 15-16, 2008 
meeting and recommended disposition of the human remains to the Little 
Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Pokagon Band of 
Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Saginaw Chippewa Indian 
Tribe of Michigan. A June 6, 2008, letter on behalf of the Secretary of 
the Interior from the Designated Federal Official, transmitted the 
authorization for the museum to effect disposition of the human remains 
of the culturally unidentifiable individuals to the three Indians 
tribes listed above contingent on the publication of a Notice of 
Inventory Completion in the Federal Register. This notice fulfills that 
requirement.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Katie 
Nelson, Collection Manager, Kingman Museum, Incorporated, 175 Limit 
Street, Battle Creek, MI 49037, telephone (269) 965-5117, fax (269) 
965-3330, before September 12, 2008. Disposition of the human remains 
to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Pokagon 
Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and Saginaw Chippewa 
Indian Tribe of Michigan may proceed after that date if no additional 
claimants come forward.
    Kingman Museum, Incorporated is responsible for notifying the Grand 
Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Little River 
Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa 
Indians, Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and 
Indiana; and Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan that this notice 
has been published.

    Dated: July 22, 2008
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-18690 Filed 8-12-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S