Notice of Inventory Completion: The Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI, 47233-47234 [E8-18681]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. AGENCY: ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Marquette County, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. This notice corrects the number of associated funerary objects described in a Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register on March 20, 2001 (FR Doc. 01–6895, pages 15752–15753). In July 2008, the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology identified six additional associated funerary objects. In the Federal Register of March 20, 2001, paragraph number 4 is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: In 1887, human remains representing two individuals were donated to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology by A. Kidder. No known individuals were identified. The 18 associated funerary objects are 1 brass kettle, 1 wooden dish, 9 bone beads, 1 copper ornament with hair, 2 brass buckles, 1 iron tomahawk, 1 wooden handle, 1 lot of iron knife fragments, and 1 lot of iron scissor fragments. In the Federal Register of March 20, 2001, paragraph number 6 is corrected by substituting the following paragraphs: Officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:38 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 18 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Patricia Capone, Repatriation Coordinator, Peabody Museum or Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138, telephone (617) 496–3702, before September 12, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary object to the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology is responsible for notifying the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and PO 00000 Frm 00108 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 47233 Indiana; Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; and White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota that this notice has been published. Dated: July 16, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAPGRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18686 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: The Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of The Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI. The human remains were removed from either the vicinity of Mackinaw City or Mackinac Island, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by The Public Museum’s professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan. At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from the vicinity of Mackinaw City or Mackinac Island, MI, by E. H. Crane, an amateur archeologist and avid collector. Upon Mr. Crane’s death in 1917, the Kent Scientific Museum, now known as The Public Museum, purchased his E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1 ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES 47234 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices collection of human remains and other anthropological and natural history collections, including the remains of these two individuals. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Museum records on the human remains are derived from Mr. Crane’s notes (written directly onto the human remains) and the original information written into the museum’s accession ledger at the time of acquisition. The museum records indicate that the human remains may be of mixed NativeEuropean ancestry, suggesting a postcontact date. In 1977, further examination by a bio-anthropologist found that the human remains were consistent with a mixture of European and Native American descent. In 2008, a professional anthropology consultant examined the human remains to ensure that they were Native American and/or of mixed Native American and European descent, and concluded they did exhibit physical characteristics of a Native American individual, but that they were not so clearly exclusive that mixed Native American-European ancestry could be ruled out. Museum records also indicated that the provenience was ‘‘old Mackinac, Michigan.’’ It is uncertain whether the exact provenience was Mackinac Island or the vicinity of Mackinaw City, as both of these locations were listed on later records, however, both Mackinaw City and Mackinac Island are in the tribal homeland of the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan. Historical evidence provided to the museum by the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians establishes the Mackinac area as ancestral land of the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians since before the arrival of the first European settlers to the area in the 1670s. The same documentation also provided evidence of occurrences of inter-marriage between people of Native American and European descent. Based on museum records, collector’s notes, consultation evidence, and extensive examination of the human remains, The Public Museum reasonably believes the human remains are of Native American ancestry and have a shared group relationship with the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan. Officials of The Public Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of The Public Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:38 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 between the Native American human remains and the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Marilyn Merdzinski, Curator of Collections and Preservation, The Public Museum, 272 Pearl St NW, Grand Rapids, MI 49504, telephone (616) 456–3521, before September 12, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Public Museum is responsible for notifying the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan and Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan that this notice has been published. Dated: July 22, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18681 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed from Jefferson County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Burke Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hoh Indian Tribe of the Hoh Indian Reservation, Washington; Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe of Washington; Port Gamble Indian PO 00000 Frm 00109 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Community of the Port Gamble Reservation, Washington; Quileute Tribe of the Quileute Reservation Washington; and Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington. Sometime before 1952, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from south of Brinnon in Jefferson County, WA, by Sherry Berthiaume. The human remains were subsequently transferred to the Burke Museum in 1952 (Burke Accn. #3800). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains are consistent with Native American morphology and therefore have been determined to be Native American. Brinnon is within the territory of the Twana people. Twana is a dialect of the Salish language and is represented by three subgroups: Skokomish, Duhelelips, and Kolsids. The Twana are represented by the present-day Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington. Brinnon is part of the aboriginal territory of the Skokomish as defined by the 1855 Treaty of Point-No-Point. Other ethnographic and legal documentation is consistent with this determination (Indian Claims Commission; Elmendorf 1960; Mooney 1896; Handbook of North American Indians 1990; Smith 1940). Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9- 10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195–3010, telephone (206) 685–2282, before September 12, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying the Hoh Indian Tribe of the Hoh Indian Reservation, Washington; Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe of Washington; Port Gamble Indian Community of the Port Gamble Reservation, Washington; Quileute E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 157 (Wednesday, August 13, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 47233-47234]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-18681]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: The Public Museum, Grand Rapids, 
MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of The 
Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI. The human remains were removed from 
either the vicinity of Mackinaw City or Mackinac Island, MI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by The Public 
Museum's professional staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of two 
individuals were removed from the vicinity of Mackinaw City or Mackinac 
Island, MI, by E. H. Crane, an amateur archeologist and avid collector. 
Upon Mr. Crane's death in 1917, the Kent Scientific Museum, now known 
as The Public Museum, purchased his

[[Page 47234]]

collection of human remains and other anthropological and natural 
history collections, including the remains of these two individuals. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Museum records on the human remains are derived from Mr. Crane's 
notes (written directly onto the human remains) and the original 
information written into the museum's accession ledger at the time of 
acquisition. The museum records indicate that the human remains may be 
of mixed Native-European ancestry, suggesting a post-contact date. In 
1977, further examination by a bio-anthropologist found that the human 
remains were consistent with a mixture of European and Native American 
descent. In 2008, a professional anthropology consultant examined the 
human remains to ensure that they were Native American and[sol]or of 
mixed Native American and European descent, and concluded they did 
exhibit physical characteristics of a Native American individual, but 
that they were not so clearly exclusive that mixed Native American-
European ancestry could be ruled out.
    Museum records also indicated that the provenience was ``old 
Mackinac, Michigan.'' It is uncertain whether the exact provenience was 
Mackinac Island or the vicinity of Mackinaw City, as both of these 
locations were listed on later records, however, both Mackinaw City and 
Mackinac Island are in the tribal homeland of the Little Traverse Bay 
Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan. Historical evidence provided to the 
museum by the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians establishes the 
Mackinac area as ancestral land of the Little Traverse Bay Band of 
Odawa Indians since before the arrival of the first European settlers 
to the area in the 1670s. The same documentation also provided evidence 
of occurrences of inter-marriage between people of Native American and 
European descent. Based on museum records, collector's notes, 
consultation evidence, and extensive examination of the human remains, 
The Public Museum reasonably believes the human remains are of Native 
American ancestry and have a shared group relationship with the Little 
Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan.
    Officials of The Public Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described above represent the 
physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. 
Officials of The Public Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 
25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity 
that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains 
and the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Marilyn 
Merdzinski, Curator of Collections and Preservation, The Public Museum, 
272 Pearl St NW, Grand Rapids, MI 49504, telephone (616) 456-3521, 
before September 12, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the 
Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan may proceed after 
that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Public Museum is responsible for notifying the Little Traverse 
Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan and Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of 
Chippewa Indians of Michigan that this notice has been published.

    Dated: July 22, 2008
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-18681 Filed 8-12-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S