Notice of Inventory Completion: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 47237-47242 [E8-18680]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Dr. Nina Lerman, Northwest Museum, Whitman College, 345 Boyer Ave, Walla Walla, WA 99362, telephone (509) 527- 5798, before September 12, 2008. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Northwest Museum is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon that this notice has been published. Dated: July 14, 2008. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18677 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Hastings, NE National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History (Hastings Museum), Hastings, NE. The human remains were removed from Stanley Mound, also known as Parkin site (3CS29), Cross County, AR. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Hastings Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Stanley Mound in Cross County, AR. The human remains were donated to the Hastings Museum by an unknown donor and cataloged into the collection between 1926 and 1931. No known VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:38 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 individual was identified. Museum records state that three pottery vessels were found with the human remains, but they were not accessioned into the collection. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains are of Native American descent. Dental attrition is consistent with an individual from the Mississippian period. Research provided by the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, conducted through the Arkansas Archeological Survey, indicate that Stanley Mound is also known as the Parkin site (3CS29). The Parkin site was first excavated in 1879 and sits on land once owned by John Stanley (for which the mound was named). The site is one of the best preserved villages from the Mississippian period. The Parkin site is a fortified village located on the St. Francis River in northeastern Arkansas. The site consists of several mounds, and plazas surrounded by rows of houses. The site has yielded thousands of artifacts, including potsherds and complete grave pottery. Although the pottery was not accessioned into the Hastings Museum collection, the records show that they are consistent with other funerary objects found at the Parkin site. Researchers suggest that the Parkin site represents a late Mississippian chiefdom to the early Protohistoric Period, an era spanning from A.D. 1350 to 1600. The site is believed to be the village of Casqui, which was visited by Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto. French documents dating to circa A.D. 1700, indicate that the Quapaw were the only people to have villages along the St. Francis River in eastern Arkansas. Quapaw oral tradition supports this documentation. Officials of the Hastings Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Hastings Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Teresa Kreutzer-Hodson, Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History, PO Box 11286, Hastings, NE 68902, telephone (402) 461–2399, before September 12, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma PO 00000 Frm 00112 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 47237 may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Hastings Museum is responsible for notifying the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: July 22, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18674 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA National Park Service. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from San Louis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and Ventura Counties, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. An assessment of the human remains, catalogue records, and relevant associated documents was made by the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 22 individuals (10 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SBa–1, also known as Olson’s Site 6, a site located on the north bank of Rincon Creek at Rincon Point, approximately three miles southeast of Carpinteria in Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. The human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the Phoebe A. E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1 ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES 47238 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices Hearst Museum of Anthropology in 1928 through University Appropriation (Accession 633). Additional archeological materials were removed and donated to the museum by Francis A. Riddell and Franklin Fenenga in 1949 (Accession UCAS–8), by Eugene Prince in 1957 (Accession UCAS–465), and by Robert L. Hoover in 1968 (Accession 2413). No known individuals were identified. The 36 associated funerary objects are 5 soil samples, 12 shells and 1 shell fragment, 1 pestle, 10 lumps of clay, 1 ochre fragment, 5 animal bones, and 1 bead. In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 71 individuals (56 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SBa–43, also known as Olson’s Site 2, a site located on the More Ranch near Goleta, in Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1928, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology through University Appropriation (Accession 633). Additional archeological materials were removed and donated to the museum by Robert L. Hoover in 1968 (Accession 2413). No known individuals were identified. The 83 associated funerary objects are 10 animal bones, 1 asphalt fragment, 4 awls and awl fragments, 4 charmstones, 1 dagger point, 8 flint flakes, 1 hammerstone, 1 fragmented implement, 5 limestone objects, 11 mortars and mortar fragments, 2 lumps of ochre, 8 pebbles, 5 pestles and pestle fragments, 1 rubbing stone, 4 shells, 8 spear points, 7 stone fragments, and 2 whetstones. Between 1927 and 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 137 individuals (121 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SBa–46, also known as Olson’s Site 1, a site located on Mescal Island near Goleta, in Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1928, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology through University Appropriation (Accession 633). Additional archeological materials were removed and donated to the museum by Phillip C. Orr in 1941 (Accession 1941T). No known individuals were identified. The 2,106 associated funerary objects are 9 abalone fragments; 19 animal bones (including uncounted lots); 20 arrow points; 1 lump of ash; 4 asphalt fragments; 6 awl and awl fragments; 1 ball; 1 barb; 2 basketry fragments; 1,360 beads and bead fragments; 3 bowls; 4 buttons; 2 flint cores; 3 crystal fragments; 2 dagger points; 5 dishes; 2 drill; 5 fishhooks; 61 flint flakes; 1 matting fragment; 47 implements; 6 knives; 3 limestone VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:38 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 fragments; 9 mortars; 4 mullers; 22 necklaces; 3 needles; 16 lumps of ochre; 31 olla and olla fragments; 4 ornaments; 10 pebbles; 19 pendants and pendant fragments; 4 pestles; 1 pin; 2 pipes; 7 rings; 2 rocks; 1 sandstone fragment; 281 shells, various shell objects and uncounted lots; 1 sinker; 2 stone slabs; 8 soil samples (possibly containing materials); 5 spear points; 1 spike; 1 turtle shell fragment; 25 stones and stone fragments; 4 animal teeth; 19 tubes and tube fragments; 10 twine fragments; 1 weapon; 11 whalebone fragments; and 35 whistles and whistle fragments. In 1950, human remains representing a minimum of one individual (one catalogue record) were removed from CA-SBa–543, a site located on a knoll north of Jalama Creek near the confluence with Gaspar Creek north of Point Conception, in Santa Barbara County, CA, by D.W. Lathrap and R.H. Brooks. The human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by the collectors (Accession 1011). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Between 1949 and 1950, human remains representing a minimum of 187 individuals (149 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SBa–7, a site located at the mouth of Carpinteria Creek in Santa Barbara County, CA, by J.A. Bennyhoff & A.D. Mohr. The human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum both in 1949 and 1950 through University Appropriation (Accession numbers 970 and 996 respectively). Additional human remains were removed by J.A. Bennyhoff and donated to the museum by Charles Rozaire of the Los Angeles County Museum in 1950 (Accession 1864). No known individuals were identified. The 997 associated funerary objects are 1 antler, 1 lump of ash, 1 asphalt fragment, 1 awl fragment, 735 beads, 1 blade, 17 bones and bone fragments, 1 charmstone, 2 choppers, 1 concretion, 7 crystals, 26 uncounted bags of faunal remains, 3 grinding slabs, 2 hammerstones, 1 fragment of human bone (unconfirmed), 2 implements, 3 knives, 37 manos and mano fragments, 48 metates and metate fragments, 2 fragments of mica, 16 lumps of ochre, 1 pebble, 8 pecking stones, 8 lumps of pigment, 1 pin fragment, 1 point, 1 ring, 1 rubbing stone, 1 lot of sand with ochre, 26 scrapers and 10 scraper fragments, 16 shells, 2 sinkers, 3 slabs, 1 steatite fragment, 6 stones, 2 bone tool fragments, and 1 tooth fragment. In 1908, human remains representing a minimum of 21 individuals (21 catalogue records) were removed from PO 00000 Frm 00113 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 CA-SBa–73, a site located on the north side of Tecolate Creek on the Tecolate Ranch, Santa Barbara County, CA, by F. W. Putnam. In 1908, the human remains and archeological materials were donated by the collector to the museum and accessioned (Accession 329). No known individuals were identified. The 347 associated funerary objects are 2 antler tips, 245 beads, 13 animal bones, 10 flint chips, 1 club stone, 2 drills, 1 hammerstone, 2 knives, 1 mortar, 3 ornaments, 7 pendants, 2 points, 34 shells and shell fragments, 1 whetstone, and 23 whistles and whistle fragments. In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals (one catalogue record) were removed from CA-SBa–8, also known as Olson’s Site 7, a site located approximately two miles southwest of Carpinteria, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1928, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 633). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of nine individuals (4 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SBa–89, also known as Olson’s Site 11, a site located on the east bank of Tajiguas Creek approximately 18 miles west of Goleta, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1928, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 633). No known individuals were identified. The six associated funerary objects are one mortar and five wood fragments. Prior to 1900, human remains representing a minimum of one individual (one catalogue record) were removed from an unspecified location ‘‘probably near Santa Ynez, California,’’ (CA-SBa-NL–1), in Santa Barbara County, CA, by P. M. Jones. The human remains were accessioned into the museum later that same year through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe A. Hearst (Accession 33). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of one individual (one catalogue record) were removed from an unspecified location listed as ‘‘site 4, 2 mi. n. of Goleta on James Stevens Indian Orchard ranch,’’ (CA-SBa-NL–3), in Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. The human remains were accessioned into the museum later that same year through University Appropriation (Accession 633). No E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1 ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1984, human remains representing a minimum of one individual (one catalogue record) were removed from an unknown location, (CA-SBa-NL–6), in Santa Barbara County, CA, by A.V. Wood. In 1984, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by A. Borg (Accession 3938). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1929, human remains representing a minimum of one individual (one catalogue record) were removed from ‘‘various sites on Santa Barbara Coast and Islands,’’ (CA-SBa-NL–7), in Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. The human remains were accessioned into the museum later that same year through University Appropriation (Accession 630). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 357 individuals (189 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI–100, a site located near Posa Landing, Santa Cruz Island in Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1928, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 636). No known individuals were identified. The 10,871 associated funerary objects are 17 abalone fragments; 95 animal bones (approximate count); 17 arrow points; 41 asphalt fragments; 62 awls and awl fragments; 5 barbs; 11 bark fragments; 45 basketry fragments; 6,396 beads; 2 blades; 1 bowl with 1 lid; 11 buttons; 1 claw fragment; 1 clay fragment; 4 concretions; 1 crystal fragment; 14 disks; 220 drills; 62 fishhooks; 3 flakes; 4 flukes; 25 implement fragments; 1 incineration; 3 knives; 24 matting fragments; 1 metate; 7 mortar fragments; 5 necklaces; 2 needles; 1 obsidian flake; 52 fragments of ochre; 201 ornaments; 11 pebbles; 414 pendants; 5 pestle fragments; 35 pin fragments; 4 planking fragments; 21 points; 37 rings; 1 stone scraper; 2 scutes; 10 seal bone fragments; 2 serpentines; 2,835 shells (approximate count); 11 non-human skull fragments; 1 soil sample containing uncounted lithics, uncounted beads and other fragmented materials; 2 spatulas; 2 spear point fragments; 3 steatite fragments; 42 stone fragments; 10 string fragments; 1 sword; 6 animal teeth; 19 tube fragments; 30 turtle shell fragments; 15 whalebones; 1 whetstone; 11 whistle fragments; 3 wood fragments; and 1 worked bone. Between 1927 and 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 10 VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:38 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 individuals (7 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI–103, a site located near Johnson’s Landing, Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1928, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 633). No known individuals were identified. The 172 associated funerary objects are 1 animal bone, 17 awl fragments, 1 barb, 41 beads, 9 pendants, and 103 shells. Between 1927 and 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 13 individuals (8 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI–104, a site located near Johnson’s Landing on Santa Cruz Island, in Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1928, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 633). No known individuals were identified. The 20 associated funerary objects are 2 awl fragments, 1 bead, 10 animal bones, 1 fish vertebra, 2 implement fragments, 3 stingray jawbones, and 1 whalebone fragment. In 1927, human remains representing a minimum of 37 individuals (26 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI–131, a site located near Coches Prietos on Santa Cruz Island, in Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. Later that same year, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 630). No known individuals were identified. The 47 associated funerary objects are 1 stone and 46 animal bone fragments. In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 25 individuals (16 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI–138, a site located near Smuggler’s Cove on Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. Later that same year, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 633). No known individuals were identified. The 196 associated funerary objects are 27 animal bones, 3 arrow points, 4 awl and awl fragments, 1 barb, 20 basketry fragments, 40 beads, 1 piece of coral, 1 crystal, 10 disks, 3 dishes, 10 drills, 2 implement fragments, 1 lid, 17 fragments of ochre, 2 pebbles, 31 pendants, 2 pestles, 1 point fragment, 1 shark tooth, 14 shells, 1 steatite fragment, 2 stones, and 2 wood fragments. In 1927, human remains representing a minimum of 11 individuals (7 catalogue records) were removed from PO 00000 Frm 00114 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 47239 CA-SCrI–147, a site located near Prisoners Harbor on Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1927, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 626). No known individuals were identified. The 1,981 associated funerary objects are 2 awls, 3 stones, 1 jar fragment, 1,476 animal bones, 8 beads, 489 shells, and 2 whale bone fragments. In 1927, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals (five catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI–154, a site located near Orizaba on Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1927, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 626). No known individuals were identified. The 108 associated funerary objects are 49 animal bones, 1 lithic implement, 2 mortar fragments, 2 pebbles, 33 shells and uncounted lots, 20 stone fragments, and 1 non-human vertebra. In 1927, human remains representing a minimum of eight individuals (six catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI–159, a site located near Orizaba on Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1927, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 633). No known individuals were identified. The 70 associated funerary objects are 7 animal bones, 3 awl fragments, 2 beads, 2 charmstones, 1 gravestone, 3 fragmented implements, 1 ornament, 5 pebbles, 7 pestles, 1 pipe, 3 points, 3 shells, 1 soil sample, 20 stone fragments, 6 tool fragments, and 5 whetstones. In 1927, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals (four catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI–162, a site located near Orizaba on Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1927, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 626). No known individuals were identified. The 57 associated funerary objects are 4 abalone fragments, 12 basketry fragments, 10 beads, 1 drill, 9 pebbles, 2 pestles, 8 shells, and 11 stone fragments. In 1927, human remains representing a minimum of 108 individuals (83 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI–3 (also known as Olson’s site E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1 ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES 47240 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices 3), a site located near Forney’s Cove on Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1927, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 626). In 1968, additional human remains representing a minimum of five individuals (two catalogue records) were removed and donated to the museum by Robert Hoover (Accession 2413). There are a total minimum number of 113 individuals (85 catalogue records) removed from CA-SCrI–3 in the possession of the museum. No known individuals were identified. The 9,302 associated funerary objects are 10 abalone fragments, 80 animal bones and 2 bags of uncounted animal bones, 34 asphalt fragments, 46 awls and awl fragments, 7 barbs, 672 basketry fragments, 6,533 beads, 1 bowl, 14 buttons, 3 charcoal fragments and 1 bag of uncounted charcoal fragments, 3 disks, 1 drill, 2 fish bones, 27 flint flakes, 52 hammerstones, 410 implements and implement fragments, 1 jawbone, 3 knives, 11 mortars, 59 fragments of ochre, 62 ornaments, 8 lumps of paint, 33 pebbles, 10 pendants, 10 pestle fragments, 2 pins, 4 points, 1 sandstone fragment, 974 shells, 1 smoothing pebble, 1 smoothing stone, 1 soil sample, 2 steatite fragments, 102 stone fragments, 3 animal teeth, 3 tools, 2 tubes, 76 turtle shell fragments, 11 vertebrae, 9 wedge fragments, and 15 whalebone fragments. In 1927, human remains representing a minimum of 130 individuals (106 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI–83, a site located near West Ranch on Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1927, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 630). No known individuals were identified. The 232 associated funerary objects are 50 abalone fragments, 63 animal bones, 2 asphalt fragments, 6 basket pebbles, 5 bone cylinders, 1 button, 2 flakes, 19 implements, 4 metate fragments, 7 mortar fragments, 50 pebbles, 7 pestles, 1 scraper, 2 smoothing stones, 10 stone fragments, and 3 whetstones. In 1899, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals (three catalogue records) were removed at an unknown location on Santa Cruz Island (CA-SCrI-NL–1), Santa Barbara County, CA, and donated to the museum by Mrs. Blanche Trask (Accession 382). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:38 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 In 1953, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals (one catalogue record) were removed from CA-SLO–125, a site located on the east side of Pismo Creek near Maxwelton, San Louis Obispo County, CA, by J.A. Bennyhoff and A.B. Elsasser. In 1953, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession UCAS 306). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals (four catalogue records) were removed from an unknown location on San Miguel Island, (CA-SMINL–1), Santa Barbara County, CA, by an unknown individual. In 1994, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by the University of California, Berkeley Museum of Paleontology (Accession 4643). No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is an animal bone. In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals (three catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI–147 (also known as Jones’ Campsite 6), a site located in the Jolla Vieja Canyon on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. The 20 associated funerary objects are 1 mortar and 19 pendants. In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of one individual (one catalogue record) were removed from CA-SRI–156 (also known as Jones’ Campsite 34), a site located on the west side of South Point on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a pendant. In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals (three catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI–24 (also known as Jones’ Campsite 19), a site located in a canyon south of Brockway Point on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. The four associated funerary objects are one fossil fragment, one bone implement, and two pendants. PO 00000 Frm 00115 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of eight individuals (eight catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI–31 (also known as Jones’ Campsite 35), a site located northwest of Bee Rock on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a pebble. In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of seven individuals (six catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI–34 (also known as Jones’ Campsite 21), a site located near Canada Soledad, south of Brockway Point on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. The four associated funerary objects are two ornaments and two pendants. In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of one individual (one catalogue record) were removed from CA-SRI–35 (also known as Jones’ Campsite 18), a site located on a ridge between the east fork of Soledad Canyon and the west fork of Dry Canyon on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of 27 individuals (22 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI–40 (also known as Jones’ Campsite 4), a site located on a sea cliff on the west side of Verde Canyon on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. The nine associated funerary objects are nine wood fragments. In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals (two catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI–50 (also known as Jones’ Campsite 15), a site located at the head of Canada Seca, south of Brockway Point on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a stone. E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1 ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals (five catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI–6 (also known as Jones’ Campsite 30), a site located at the mouth of Canada del Corral on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. The 626 associated funerary objects are 2 knives, 100 fragments of grass string, 340 pendants, 80 rings, 100 beads, and 4 animal bones. In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of 20 individuals (16 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI–60, a site located on the northwest anchorage on Beecher’s Bay on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. The 73 associated funerary objects are 40 asphalt fragments, 15 pendants, 1 uncounted lot of shells, and 17 tubes. In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of eight individuals (six catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI–76 (also known as Jones’ Campsite 8), a site located near Beecher’s Bay on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of six individuals (four catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI–78 (also known as Jones’ Campsite 3), a site located at the mouth of Water Canyon in Beecher’s Bay on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals (three catalogue records) were removed from an unknown location on Santa Rosa Island (CA-SRINL–10), Santa Barbara County, CA, by an unknown individual. The human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum from the Berkeley Museum at an unknown VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:38 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 date (Accession 100BL). No known individuals were identified. The 19 associated objects are 19 abalone pendants. In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of 126 individuals (106 catalogue records) were removed from an unknown location on Santa Rosa Island (CA-SRI-NL–1), Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals (two catalogue records) were removed from an unknown location known as ‘‘Santa Rosa Island, Campsite 10,’’ (CA-SRI-NL– 3), Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals (three catalogue records) were removed from an unknown location known as ‘‘Santa Rosa Island, Campsite 16,’’ ( CA-SRINL–4), on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of one individual (one catalogue records) were removed from an unknown location on Santa Rosa Island (CA-SRI-NL–8), Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. Later that same year, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals (three catalogue records) were removed from CA-Ven–62, a site located on the beach on the southeast bank of Rincon Creek, Ventura County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. Later that same year, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 633). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The determination of cultural affiliation of the human remains and associated funerary objects is based on PO 00000 Frm 00116 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 47241 consultation with the representatives of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, and on museum analyses that show that the proveniences listed in this report are unambiguously situated within the Chumash aboriginal territory, as defined in the Handbook of North American Indians, Vol. 8. Data from archeology, linguistic, and oral traditions show that the Chumash have continuously inhabited Santa Barbara County, portions of Ventura and San Luis Obispo counties, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa and San Miguel islands for more than 7,000 years. Descendants of these Chumash are members of the Federallyrecognized Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. Officials of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent a minimum of 1,409 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), the 27,390 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity which can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. Representatives of any other Indian Tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Judd King, Interim Director of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, telephone (510) 642–3682, before September 12, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology is responsible for notifying the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California that this notice has been published. E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1 47242 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices Dated: July 14, 2008. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18680 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Notice is hereby given that on July 25, 2008, a proposed Consent Decree in United States and State of Texas v. Beazer East, Inc., Civil Action No. 5:08– CV–00132, was lodged with the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas. In this action the United States, on behalf of the United States Department of the Interior, and the State of Texas, on behalf of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (‘‘TCEQ’’), the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (‘‘TPWD’’), and the Texas General Land Office (‘‘TGLO’’) (collectively, the ‘‘State’’), as federal and state trustees over natural resources, sought, pursuant to Section 107(a)(4)(C) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (‘‘CERCLA’’), 42 U.S.C. 9607(a)(4)(C), and Section 311(f) of the Clean Water Act (‘‘CWA’’), 33 U.S.C. 1321(f), to recover damages for injury to, loss of, or destruction of natural resources as a result of releases and threatened release of hazardous substances into the environment at or from the Koppers Texarkana Superfund Site, including the recovery of the costs of assessing such injury and damages and the future costs of overseeing and monitoring restoration actions. The Koppers Site is a former wood treatment facility located approximately one mile west of downtown Texarkana, Bowie County, Texas. The proposed Consent Decree resolves the liability of Beazer East, Inc. for damages for injury to, loss of, or destruction of natural resources as alleged in the Complaint. Under the terms of the Consent Decree, and in accordance with the restoration project selected in the Final Amended Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment, Beazer will provide for the recordation of a Conservation Easement on 76.708 acres of bottomland hardwoods within the Lennox Woods Preserve in Red River County. Additionally, Beazer has paid the trustees’ past assessment costs and will pay the trustees’ future costs related to the restoration project. VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:38 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 The Department of Justice will receive for a period of thirty (30) days from the date of this publication comments relating to the Consent Decree. Comments should be addressed to the Assistant Attorney General for the Environment and Natural Resources Division, U.S. Department of Justice, and either e-mailed to pubcommentees.enrd@usdoj.gov or mailed to P.O. Box 7611, NW., Washington, DC 20044– 7611, and should refer to United States and State of Texas v. Beazer East, Inc., D.J. Ref. 90–11–3–07668. The Consent Decree may be examined at the Office of the United States Attorney, Eastern District of Texas, 350 Magnolia Street, Suite 150, Beaumont, Texas, 77701–2237, and at the offices of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services Field Office, 711 Stadium Dr., Suite 252, Arlington, TX 76011. During the public comment period, the Consent Decree, may also be examined on the following Department of Justice Web site, to http:// www.usdoj.gov/enrd/ Consent_Decrees.html. A copy of the Consent Decree may also be obtained by mail from the Consent Decree Library, P.O. Box 7611, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, DC 20044–7611 or by faxing or e-mailing a request to Tonia Fleetwood (tonia.fleetwood@usdoj.gov), fax no. (202) 514–0097, phone confirmation number (202) 514–1547. In requesting a copy from the Consent Decree Library, please enclose a check in the amount of $28.50 for the Consent Decree and attachments, or $9.75 for the Consent Decree only (25 cents per page reproduction cost) payable to the U.S. Treasury or, if by e-mail or fax, forward a check in that amount to the Consent Decree Library at the stated address. Maureen M. Katz, Assistant Section Chief, Environmental Enforcement Section, Environment and Natural Resources Division. [FR Doc. E8–18716 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993 Cooperative Research Group on Development and Evaluation of a Gas Chromatograph Testing Protocol Correction In notice document E8–15670 appearing on page 40882 in the issue of Wednesday, July 16, 2008, make the following corrections: Fmt 4703 BILLING CODE 1505–01–D DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE United States Parole Commission Public Announcement; Pursuant to the Government in the Sunshine Act (Pub. L. 94–409) [5 U.S.C. Section 552b] Department of Justice, United States Parole Commission. DATE AND TIME: 12 p.m., Thursday, August 14, 2008. PLACE: U.S. Parole Commission, 5550 Friendship Boulevard, 4th Floor, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815. STATUS: Closed. MATTERS CONSIDERED: The following matter will be considered during the closed portion of the Commission’s Business Meeting: Petition for reconsideration involving one original jurisdiction case pursuant to 28 CFR 2.27. AGENCY CONTACT: Thomas W. Hutchison, Chief of Staff, United States Parole Commission, (301) 492–5990. AGENCY HOLDING MEETING: Dated: August 14, 2008. Rockne J. Chickinell, General Counsel, U.S. Parole Commission. [FR Doc. E8–18563 Filed 8–8–08; 3:30 pm] BILLING CODE 4410–31–M DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE United States Parole Commission Sfmt 4703 Department of Justice, United States Parole Commission. TIME AND DATE: 10 a.m., Thursday, August 14, 2008. PLACE: 5550 Friendship Blvd., Fourth Floor, Chevy Chase, MD 20815. STATUS: Open. MATTERS TO BE CONSIDERED: The following matters have been placed on the agenda for the open Parole Commission meeting: 1. Approval of Minutes of May 2008 Quarterly Business Meeting AGENCY HOLDING MEETING: Antitrust Division Frm 00117 [FR Doc. Z8–15670 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] Public Announcement; Pursuant to the Government in the Sunshine Act; (Pub. L. 94–409) [5 U.S.C. Section 552b] BILLING CODE 4410–15–P PO 00000 1. On page 40882, in the first column, in the first paragraph, in the fourth line from the bottom, ‘‘PP Pipelines’’ should read ‘‘BP Pipelines’’. 2. On the same page, in the same column, in the same paragraph, in the second line from the bottom, ‘‘GMEH’’ should read ‘‘GMBH’’. E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 157 (Wednesday, August 13, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 47237-47242]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-18680]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of 
Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the control of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, 
University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA. The human remains and 
associated funerary objects were removed from San Louis Obispo, Santa 
Barbara, and Ventura Counties, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    An assessment of the human remains, catalogue records, and relevant 
associated documents was made by the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of 
Anthropology professional staff in consultation with representatives of 
the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez 
Reservation, California.
    In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 22 individuals (10 
catalogue records) were removed from CA-SBa-1, also known as Olson's 
Site 6, a site located on the north bank of Rincon Creek at Rincon 
Point, approximately three miles southeast of Carpinteria in Santa 
Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. The human remains and 
archeological materials were accessioned into the Phoebe A.

[[Page 47238]]

Hearst Museum of Anthropology in 1928 through University Appropriation 
(Accession 633). Additional archeological materials were removed and 
donated to the museum by Francis A. Riddell and Franklin Fenenga in 
1949 (Accession UCAS-8), by Eugene Prince in 1957 (Accession UCAS-465), 
and by Robert L. Hoover in 1968 (Accession 2413). No known individuals 
were identified. The 36 associated funerary objects are 5 soil samples, 
12 shells and 1 shell fragment, 1 pestle, 10 lumps of clay, 1 ochre 
fragment, 5 animal bones, and 1 bead.
    In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 71 individuals (56 
catalogue records) were removed from CA-SBa-43, also known as Olson's 
Site 2, a site located on the More Ranch near Goleta, in Santa Barbara 
County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1928, the human remains and 
archeological materials were accessioned into the Phoebe A. Hearst 
Museum of Anthropology through University Appropriation (Accession 
633). Additional archeological materials were removed and donated to 
the museum by Robert L. Hoover in 1968 (Accession 2413). No known 
individuals were identified. The 83 associated funerary objects are 10 
animal bones, 1 asphalt fragment, 4 awls and awl fragments, 4 
charmstones, 1 dagger point, 8 flint flakes, 1 hammerstone, 1 
fragmented implement, 5 limestone objects, 11 mortars and mortar 
fragments, 2 lumps of ochre, 8 pebbles, 5 pestles and pestle fragments, 
1 rubbing stone, 4 shells, 8 spear points, 7 stone fragments, and 2 
whetstones.
    Between 1927 and 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 137 
individuals (121 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SBa-46, also 
known as Olson's Site 1, a site located on Mescal Island near Goleta, 
in Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1928, the human 
remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the Phoebe A. 
Hearst Museum of Anthropology through University Appropriation 
(Accession 633). Additional archeological materials were removed and 
donated to the museum by Phillip C. Orr in 1941 (Accession 1941T). No 
known individuals were identified. The 2,106 associated funerary 
objects are 9 abalone fragments; 19 animal bones (including uncounted 
lots); 20 arrow points; 1 lump of ash; 4 asphalt fragments; 6 awl and 
awl fragments; 1 ball; 1 barb; 2 basketry fragments; 1,360 beads and 
bead fragments; 3 bowls; 4 buttons; 2 flint cores; 3 crystal fragments; 
2 dagger points; 5 dishes; 2 drill; 5 fishhooks; 61 flint flakes; 1 
matting fragment; 47 implements; 6 knives; 3 limestone fragments; 9 
mortars; 4 mullers; 22 necklaces; 3 needles; 16 lumps of ochre; 31 olla 
and olla fragments; 4 ornaments; 10 pebbles; 19 pendants and pendant 
fragments; 4 pestles; 1 pin; 2 pipes; 7 rings; 2 rocks; 1 sandstone 
fragment; 281 shells, various shell objects and uncounted lots; 1 
sinker; 2 stone slabs; 8 soil samples (possibly containing materials); 
5 spear points; 1 spike; 1 turtle shell fragment; 25 stones and stone 
fragments; 4 animal teeth; 19 tubes and tube fragments; 10 twine 
fragments; 1 weapon; 11 whalebone fragments; and 35 whistles and 
whistle fragments.
    In 1950, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
(one catalogue record) were removed from CA-SBa-543, a site located on 
a knoll north of Jalama Creek near the confluence with Gaspar Creek 
north of Point Conception, in Santa Barbara County, CA, by D.W. Lathrap 
and R.H. Brooks. The human remains were accessioned into the museum 
through a donation by the collectors (Accession 1011). No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Between 1949 and 1950, human remains representing a minimum of 187 
individuals (149 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SBa-7, a site 
located at the mouth of Carpinteria Creek in Santa Barbara County, CA, 
by J.A. Bennyhoff & A.D. Mohr. The human remains and archeological 
materials were accessioned into the museum both in 1949 and 1950 
through University Appropriation (Accession numbers 970 and 996 
respectively). Additional human remains were removed by J.A. Bennyhoff 
and donated to the museum by Charles Rozaire of the Los Angeles County 
Museum in 1950 (Accession 1864). No known individuals were identified. 
The 997 associated funerary objects are 1 antler, 1 lump of ash, 1 
asphalt fragment, 1 awl fragment, 735 beads, 1 blade, 17 bones and bone 
fragments, 1 charmstone, 2 choppers, 1 concretion, 7 crystals, 26 
uncounted bags of faunal remains, 3 grinding slabs, 2 hammerstones, 1 
fragment of human bone (unconfirmed), 2 implements, 3 knives, 37 manos 
and mano fragments, 48 metates and metate fragments, 2 fragments of 
mica, 16 lumps of ochre, 1 pebble, 8 pecking stones, 8 lumps of 
pigment, 1 pin fragment, 1 point, 1 ring, 1 rubbing stone, 1 lot of 
sand with ochre, 26 scrapers and 10 scraper fragments, 16 shells, 2 
sinkers, 3 slabs, 1 steatite fragment, 6 stones, 2 bone tool fragments, 
and 1 tooth fragment.
    In 1908, human remains representing a minimum of 21 individuals (21 
catalogue records) were removed from CA-SBa-73, a site located on the 
north side of Tecolate Creek on the Tecolate Ranch, Santa Barbara 
County, CA, by F. W. Putnam. In 1908, the human remains and 
archeological materials were donated by the collector to the museum and 
accessioned (Accession 329). No known individuals were identified. The 
347 associated funerary objects are 2 antler tips, 245 beads, 13 animal 
bones, 10 flint chips, 1 club stone, 2 drills, 1 hammerstone, 2 knives, 
1 mortar, 3 ornaments, 7 pendants, 2 points, 34 shells and shell 
fragments, 1 whetstone, and 23 whistles and whistle fragments.
    In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
(one catalogue record) were removed from CA-SBa-8, also known as 
Olson's Site 7, a site located approximately two miles southwest of 
Carpinteria, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1928, the 
human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the 
museum through University Appropriation (Accession 633). No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of nine individuals 
(4 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SBa-89, also known as 
Olson's Site 11, a site located on the east bank of Tajiguas Creek 
approximately 18 miles west of Goleta, Santa Barbara County, CA, by 
Ronald L. Olson. In 1928, the human remains and archeological materials 
were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation 
(Accession 633). No known individuals were identified. The six 
associated funerary objects are one mortar and five wood fragments.
    Prior to 1900, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual (one catalogue record) were removed from an unspecified 
location ``probably near Santa Ynez, California,'' (CA-SBa-NL-1), in 
Santa Barbara County, CA, by P. M. Jones. The human remains were 
accessioned into the museum later that same year through a donation by 
Mrs. Phoebe A. Hearst (Accession 33). No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
(one catalogue record) were removed from an unspecified location listed 
as ``site 4, 2 mi. n. of Goleta on James Stevens Indian Orchard 
ranch,'' (CA-SBa-NL-3), in Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. 
Olson. The human remains were accessioned into the museum later that 
same year through University Appropriation (Accession 633). No

[[Page 47239]]

known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1984, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
(one catalogue record) were removed from an unknown location, (CA-SBa-
NL-6), in Santa Barbara County, CA, by A.V. Wood. In 1984, the human 
remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by A. Borg 
(Accession 3938). No known individual was identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1929, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
(one catalogue record) were removed from ``various sites on Santa 
Barbara Coast and Islands,'' (CA-SBa-NL-7), in Santa Barbara County, 
CA, by Ronald L. Olson. The human remains were accessioned into the 
museum later that same year through University Appropriation (Accession 
630). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 357 individuals 
(189 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI-100, a site located 
near Posa Landing, Santa Cruz Island in Santa Barbara County, CA, by 
Ronald L. Olson. In 1928, the human remains and archeological materials 
were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation 
(Accession 636). No known individuals were identified. The 10,871 
associated funerary objects are 17 abalone fragments; 95 animal bones 
(approximate count); 17 arrow points; 41 asphalt fragments; 62 awls and 
awl fragments; 5 barbs; 11 bark fragments; 45 basketry fragments; 6,396 
beads; 2 blades; 1 bowl with 1 lid; 11 buttons; 1 claw fragment; 1 clay 
fragment; 4 concretions; 1 crystal fragment; 14 disks; 220 drills; 62 
fishhooks; 3 flakes; 4 flukes; 25 implement fragments; 1 incineration; 
3 knives; 24 matting fragments; 1 metate; 7 mortar fragments; 5 
necklaces; 2 needles; 1 obsidian flake; 52 fragments of ochre; 201 
ornaments; 11 pebbles; 414 pendants; 5 pestle fragments; 35 pin 
fragments; 4 planking fragments; 21 points; 37 rings; 1 stone scraper; 
2 scutes; 10 seal bone fragments; 2 serpentines; 2,835 shells 
(approximate count); 11 non-human skull fragments; 1 soil sample 
containing uncounted lithics, uncounted beads and other fragmented 
materials; 2 spatulas; 2 spear point fragments; 3 steatite fragments; 
42 stone fragments; 10 string fragments; 1 sword; 6 animal teeth; 19 
tube fragments; 30 turtle shell fragments; 15 whalebones; 1 whetstone; 
11 whistle fragments; 3 wood fragments; and 1 worked bone.
    Between 1927 and 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 10 
individuals (7 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI-103, a site 
located near Johnson's Landing, Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara 
County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1928, the human remains and 
archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through 
University Appropriation (Accession 633). No known individuals were 
identified. The 172 associated funerary objects are 1 animal bone, 17 
awl fragments, 1 barb, 41 beads, 9 pendants, and 103 shells.
    Between 1927 and 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 13 
individuals (8 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI-104, a site 
located near Johnson's Landing on Santa Cruz Island, in Santa Barbara 
County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1928, the human remains and 
archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through 
University Appropriation (Accession 633). No known individuals were 
identified. The 20 associated funerary objects are 2 awl fragments, 1 
bead, 10 animal bones, 1 fish vertebra, 2 implement fragments, 3 
stingray jawbones, and 1 whalebone fragment.
    In 1927, human remains representing a minimum of 37 individuals (26 
catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI-131, a site located near 
Coches Prietos on Santa Cruz Island, in Santa Barbara County, CA, by 
Ronald L. Olson. Later that same year, the human remains and 
archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through 
University Appropriation (Accession 630). No known individuals were 
identified. The 47 associated funerary objects are 1 stone and 46 
animal bone fragments.
    In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 25 individuals (16 
catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI-138, a site located near 
Smuggler's Cove on Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by 
Ronald L. Olson. Later that same year, the human remains and 
archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through 
University Appropriation (Accession 633). No known individuals were 
identified. The 196 associated funerary objects are 27 animal bones, 3 
arrow points, 4 awl and awl fragments, 1 barb, 20 basketry fragments, 
40 beads, 1 piece of coral, 1 crystal, 10 disks, 3 dishes, 10 drills, 2 
implement fragments, 1 lid, 17 fragments of ochre, 2 pebbles, 31 
pendants, 2 pestles, 1 point fragment, 1 shark tooth, 14 shells, 1 
steatite fragment, 2 stones, and 2 wood fragments.
    In 1927, human remains representing a minimum of 11 individuals (7 
catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI-147, a site located near 
Prisoners Harbor on Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by 
Ronald L. Olson. In 1927, the human remains and archeological materials 
were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation 
(Accession 626). No known individuals were identified. The 1,981 
associated funerary objects are 2 awls, 3 stones, 1 jar fragment, 1,476 
animal bones, 8 beads, 489 shells, and 2 whale bone fragments.
    In 1927, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals 
(five catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI-154, a site located 
near Orizaba on Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald 
L. Olson. In 1927, the human remains and archeological materials were 
accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 
626). No known individuals were identified. The 108 associated funerary 
objects are 49 animal bones, 1 lithic implement, 2 mortar fragments, 2 
pebbles, 33 shells and uncounted lots, 20 stone fragments, and 1 non-
human vertebra.
    In 1927, human remains representing a minimum of eight individuals 
(six catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI-159, a site located 
near Orizaba on Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald 
L. Olson. In 1927, the human remains and archeological materials were 
accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 
633). No known individuals were identified. The 70 associated funerary 
objects are 7 animal bones, 3 awl fragments, 2 beads, 2 charmstones, 1 
gravestone, 3 fragmented implements, 1 ornament, 5 pebbles, 7 pestles, 
1 pipe, 3 points, 3 shells, 1 soil sample, 20 stone fragments, 6 tool 
fragments, and 5 whetstones.
    In 1927, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals 
(four catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI-162, a site located 
near Orizaba on Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald 
L. Olson. In 1927, the human remains and archeological materials were 
accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation (Accession 
626). No known individuals were identified. The 57 associated funerary 
objects are 4 abalone fragments, 12 basketry fragments, 10 beads, 1 
drill, 9 pebbles, 2 pestles, 8 shells, and 11 stone fragments.
    In 1927, human remains representing a minimum of 108 individuals 
(83 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI-3 (also known as 
Olson's site

[[Page 47240]]

3), a site located near Forney's Cove on Santa Cruz Island, Santa 
Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. In 1927, the human remains and 
archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through 
University Appropriation (Accession 626). In 1968, additional human 
remains representing a minimum of five individuals (two catalogue 
records) were removed and donated to the museum by Robert Hoover 
(Accession 2413). There are a total minimum number of 113 individuals 
(85 catalogue records) removed from CA-SCrI-3 in the possession of the 
museum. No known individuals were identified. The 9,302 associated 
funerary objects are 10 abalone fragments, 80 animal bones and 2 bags 
of uncounted animal bones, 34 asphalt fragments, 46 awls and awl 
fragments, 7 barbs, 672 basketry fragments, 6,533 beads, 1 bowl, 14 
buttons, 3 charcoal fragments and 1 bag of uncounted charcoal 
fragments, 3 disks, 1 drill, 2 fish bones, 27 flint flakes, 52 
hammerstones, 410 implements and implement fragments, 1 jawbone, 3 
knives, 11 mortars, 59 fragments of ochre, 62 ornaments, 8 lumps of 
paint, 33 pebbles, 10 pendants, 10 pestle fragments, 2 pins, 4 points, 
1 sandstone fragment, 974 shells, 1 smoothing pebble, 1 smoothing 
stone, 1 soil sample, 2 steatite fragments, 102 stone fragments, 3 
animal teeth, 3 tools, 2 tubes, 76 turtle shell fragments, 11 
vertebrae, 9 wedge fragments, and 15 whalebone fragments.
    In 1927, human remains representing a minimum of 130 individuals 
(106 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SCrI-83, a site located 
near West Ranch on Santa Cruz Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by 
Ronald L. Olson. In 1927, the human remains and archeological materials 
were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation 
(Accession 630). No known individuals were identified. The 232 
associated funerary objects are 50 abalone fragments, 63 animal bones, 
2 asphalt fragments, 6 basket pebbles, 5 bone cylinders, 1 button, 2 
flakes, 19 implements, 4 metate fragments, 7 mortar fragments, 50 
pebbles, 7 pestles, 1 scraper, 2 smoothing stones, 10 stone fragments, 
and 3 whetstones.
    In 1899, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
(three catalogue records) were removed at an unknown location on Santa 
Cruz Island (CA-SCrI-NL-1), Santa Barbara County, CA, and donated to 
the museum by Mrs. Blanche Trask (Accession 382). No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1953, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
(one catalogue record) were removed from CA-SLO-125, a site located on 
the east side of Pismo Creek near Maxwelton, San Louis Obispo County, 
CA, by J.A. Bennyhoff and A.B. Elsasser. In 1953, the human remains 
were accessioned into the museum through University Appropriation 
(Accession UCAS 306). No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of four 
individuals (four catalogue records) were removed from an unknown 
location on San Miguel Island, (CA-SMI-NL-1), Santa Barbara County, CA, 
by an unknown individual. In 1994, the human remains were accessioned 
into the museum through a donation by the University of California, 
Berkeley Museum of Paleontology (Accession 4643). No known individuals 
were identified. The one associated funerary object is an animal bone.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
(three catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI-147 (also known as 
Jones' Campsite 6), a site located in the Jolla Vieja Canyon on Santa 
Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the 
human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by 
Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were 
identified. The 20 associated funerary objects are 1 mortar and 19 
pendants.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
(one catalogue record) were removed from CA-SRI-156 (also known as 
Jones' Campsite 34), a site located on the west side of South Point on 
Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, 
the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation 
by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individual was 
identified. The one associated funerary object is a pendant.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
(three catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI-24 (also known as 
Jones' Campsite 19), a site located in a canyon south of Brockway Point 
on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, 
the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation 
by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were 
identified. The four associated funerary objects are one fossil 
fragment, one bone implement, and two pendants.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of eight individuals 
(eight catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI-31 (also known as 
Jones' Campsite 35), a site located northwest of Bee Rock on Santa Rosa 
Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human 
remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. 
Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. The 
one associated funerary object is a pebble.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of seven individuals 
(six catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI-34 (also known as 
Jones' Campsite 21), a site located near Canada Soledad, south of 
Brockway Point on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. 
Jones. In 1901, the human remains were accessioned into the museum 
through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known 
individuals were identified. The four associated funerary objects are 
two ornaments and two pendants.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
(one catalogue record) were removed from CA-SRI-35 (also known as 
Jones' Campsite 18), a site located on a ridge between the east fork of 
Soledad Canyon and the west fork of Dry Canyon on Santa Rosa Island, 
Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains 
were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe 
Hearst (Accession 24). No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of 27 individuals (22 
catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI-40 (also known as Jones' 
Campsite 4), a site located on a sea cliff on the west side of Verde 
Canyon on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. 
In 1901, the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a 
donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals 
were identified. The nine associated funerary objects are nine wood 
fragments.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
(two catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI-50 (also known as 
Jones' Campsite 15), a site located at the head of Canada Seca, south 
of Brockway Point on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by 
P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains were accessioned into the museum 
through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known 
individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a 
stone.

[[Page 47241]]

    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals 
(five catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI-6 (also known as 
Jones' Campsite 30), a site located at the mouth of Canada del Corral 
on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, 
the human remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation 
by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were 
identified. The 626 associated funerary objects are 2 knives, 100 
fragments of grass string, 340 pendants, 80 rings, 100 beads, and 4 
animal bones.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of 20 individuals (16 
catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI-60, a site located on the 
northwest anchorage on Beecher's Bay on Santa Rosa Island, Santa 
Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains and 
archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through a 
donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals 
were identified. The 73 associated funerary objects are 40 asphalt 
fragments, 15 pendants, 1 uncounted lot of shells, and 17 tubes.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of eight individuals 
(six catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI-76 (also known as 
Jones' Campsite 8), a site located near Beecher's Bay on Santa Rosa 
Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human 
remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the museum 
through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of six individuals 
(four catalogue records) were removed from CA-SRI-78 (also known as 
Jones' Campsite 3), a site located at the mouth of Water Canyon in 
Beecher's Bay on Santa Rosa Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. 
Jones. In 1901, the human remains and archeological materials were 
accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst 
(Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of four 
individuals (three catalogue records) were removed from an unknown 
location on Santa Rosa Island (CA-SRI-NL-10), Santa Barbara County, CA, 
by an unknown individual. The human remains and archeological materials 
were accessioned into the museum from the Berkeley Museum at an unknown 
date (Accession 100BL). No known individuals were identified. The 19 
associated objects are 19 abalone pendants.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of 126 individuals 
(106 catalogue records) were removed from an unknown location on Santa 
Rosa Island (CA-SRI-NL-1), Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 
1901, the human remains and archeological materials were accessioned 
into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 
24). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
(two catalogue records) were removed from an unknown location known as 
``Santa Rosa Island, Campsite 10,'' (CA-SRI-NL-3), Santa Barbara 
County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human remains were accessioned 
into the museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 
24). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
(three catalogue records) were removed from an unknown location known 
as ``Santa Rosa Island, Campsite 16,'' ( CA-SRI-NL-4), on Santa Rosa 
Island, Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. In 1901, the human 
remains were accessioned into the museum through a donation by Mrs. 
Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1901, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
(one catalogue records) were removed from an unknown location on Santa 
Rosa Island (CA-SRI-NL-8), Santa Barbara County, CA, by P.M. Jones. 
Later that same year, the human remains were accessioned into the 
museum through a donation by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst (Accession 24). No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
(three catalogue records) were removed from CA-Ven-62, a site located 
on the beach on the southeast bank of Rincon Creek, Ventura County, CA, 
by Ronald L. Olson. Later that same year, the human remains and 
archeological materials were accessioned into the museum through 
University Appropriation (Accession 633). No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The determination of cultural affiliation of the human remains and 
associated funerary objects is based on consultation with the 
representatives of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of 
the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, and on museum analyses that 
show that the proveniences listed in this report are unambiguously 
situated within the Chumash aboriginal territory, as defined in the 
Handbook of North American Indians, Vol. 8. Data from archeology, 
linguistic, and oral traditions show that the Chumash have continuously 
inhabited Santa Barbara County, portions of Ventura and San Luis Obispo 
counties, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa and San Miguel islands for more than 
7,000 years. Descendants of these Chumash are members of the Federally-
recognized Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez 
Reservation, California.
    Officials of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains 
described above represent a minimum of 1,409 individuals of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of 
Anthropology have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), 
the 27,390 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been 
placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or 
later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the 
Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology have determined that, pursuant 
to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity 
which can be reasonably traced between the Native American human 
remains and associated funerary objects and the Santa Ynez Band of 
Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California.
    Representatives of any other Indian Tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Judd King, Interim Director of the Phoebe A. 
Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California Berkeley, 
Berkeley, CA 94720, telephone (510) 642-3682, before September 12, 
2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects 
to the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez 
Reservation, California may proceed after that date if no additional 
claimants come forward.
    The Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology is responsible for 
notifying the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa 
Ynez Reservation, California that this notice has been published.


[[Page 47242]]


    Dated: July 14, 2008.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-18680 Filed 8-12-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S