Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum, Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA, 47235-47237 [E8-18677]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices Tribe of the Quileute Reservation, Washington; and Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington that this notice has been published. Dated: July 16, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18673 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES AGENCY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed from south of Three Tree Point in King County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Burke Museum and University of Washington professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe of the Muckleshoot Reservation, Washington; Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington; Snoqualmie Tribe, Washington; Suquamish Indian Tribe of the Port Madison Reservation, Washington; and Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington. In 1923, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Pleasant Beach, south of Three Tree Point in King County, WA. The human remains were found by the landowner while digging in the backyard and transferred to the King County Coroner’s Office, and subsequently transferred to the Burke Museum in 1923 (Burke Accn. ι1998). VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:38 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 47235 No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains are consistent with Native American morphology and therefore have been determined to be Native American. Three Tree Point is within the usual and accustomed territory of the Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, as defined by the 1855 Treaty of Medicine Creek. Other ethnographic and legal documentation is consistent with this determination. Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Burke Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195–3010, telephone (206) 685–2282, before September 12, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe of the Muckleshoot Reservation, Washington; Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington; Snoqualmie Tribe, Washington; Suquamish Indian Tribe of the Port Madison Reservation, Washington; and Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington that this notice has been published. will hold a meeting on Monday, September 15, 2008. The Commission was established pursuant to Public Law 99–420, Sec. 103. The purpose of the commission is to consult with the Secretary of the Interior, or his designee, on matters relating to the management and development of the park, including but not limited to the acquisition of lands and interests in lands (including conservation easements on islands) and termination of rights of use and occupancy. The meeting will convene at Park Headquarters, Bar Harbor, Maine, at 1 p.m., to consider the following agenda: Dated: July 16, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18676 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum, Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA BILLING CODE 4312–50–S ACTION: DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Acadia National Park; Bar Harbor, Maine; Acadia National Park Advisory Commission; Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given in accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92–463, 86 Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App. 1, Sec. 10), that the Acadia National Park Advisory Commission PO 00000 Frm 00110 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 1. Committee reports: —Land Conservation —Park Use —Science and Education —Historic —Science and Education —Historic 2. Old business 3. Superintendent’s report 4. Public comments 5. Proposed agenda for next Commission meeting in February 2009. The meeting is open to the public. Interested persons may make oral/written presentations to the Commission or file written statements. Such requests should be made to the Superintendent at least seven days prior to the meeting. Further information concerning this meeting may be obtained from the Superintendent, Acadia National Park, P.O. Box 177, Bar Harbor, Maine 04609, tel: (207) 288–3338. Dated: July 19, 2008. Sheridan Steele, Superintendent. [FR Doc. E8–18573 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–2N–M DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Northwest Museum, Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA, that meet the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary objects’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1 ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES 47236 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. In 1901, cultural items were removed from the southwestern corner of First and Birch Streets, Walla Walla, Walla Walla County, WA, during excavation of a house foundation. The cultural items were accessioned to the museum in 1946 (Cat. #WHIT–O–11 and #WHIT– O–12). The 104 unassociated funerary objects are 104 various beads. Museum records state that the beads were removed from a grave, but there is no record of disposition of the human remains. The land occupied by the city of Walla Walla is within the ceded lands of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. It was used as a wintering ground, habitation area, hunting, fishing and food gathering area by the Weyiiletpuu (Cayuse) and Waluulapam (Walla Walla). The Weyiiletpuu (Cayuse) and Waluulapam (Walla Walla) are members of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. On November 27, 1948, cultural items were removed from a burial at Canoe Island, Site #10, Umatilla County, OR, Dr. Melvin Jacobs, Curator of the Museum of History and Art at Whitman College, and Thomas R. Garth, Jr., archeologist for the National Park Service Whitman Monument. The human remains were collected, but are not currently in the museum collection. The 11 unassociated funerary objects are 3 net sinkers, 2 scrapers, 1 chert flake, 1 knife, 1 bone awl, 1 bone needle, 1 bone point, and 1 sandstone smoother. (Cat. #WHIT–J–8, 11, 12, 17, 88, 90, 91, 99, 101, 102, and 104) Canoe Island is currently inundated by Lake Wallula, behind McNary Dam. It was an important fishing site of the Imatalamlama (Umatilla) and Waluulapam, and opposite the fishing camp of Pusim. The islands in the Columbia River were also used for refuge during invasion from hostile enemies. Canoe Island is within the ceded lands of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. On October 16, 1949, cultural items were removed from Cremation Pit #1 at Rabbit Island, Site #18, 45BN15, Benton County, WA. The human remains from Cremation Pit #1 were repatriated to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon in 1992. The cultural items were identified in the collection and are now unassociated funerary objects. The three unassociated VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:38 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 funerary objects are one clamshell, one obsidian point, and one small piece of basalt (Cat. #Whit–J–124 to #Whit–J– 126). Rabbit Island was on the Homly Channel of the Columbia River and was an important burial site and habitation area for the Waluulapam. It was also near two important salmon and eel fishing sites known as Tomist–pa and Khus–us–tenim–tala–wit. Today, the island is inundated by Lake Wallula, behind McNary Dam and is within the ceded lands of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. In 1949, Thomas R. Garth excavated at the PeoPeoMoxMox Village Site, 45WW6, Burial 2, at Waluula, Walla Walla County, WA. The burial is circa A.D. 1845–1855. The human remains were most likely repatriated to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon in 1992. The cultural items were identified in the collection and are now unassociated funerary objects. The three unassociated funerary objects are three child–sized copper bracelets (Accn. #J–2 and #1935; Cat. #Whit–J–089). Waluula was an important permanent village of the Waluulapam. The village is currently inundated by Lake Wallula, behind McNary Dam, which is within the ceded lands of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. On November 13, 1949, cultural items were removed from Burial #4 at 45BN55 Sheep Island, Site #17, Benton County, WA, by Thomas R. Garth. The one unassociated funerary object is a granite pestle (Accn. #J306, #2086; Cat. #WHIT– J–15). Sheep Island was an important burial island for the Imatalamlama, and is currently inundated behind McNary Dam and within the ceded lands of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. On December 3, 1949, Thomas R. Garth and others excavated Sheep Island, Site #17, Burial 8, Benton County, WA. The human remains were repatriated to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon in 1992. The cultural items were identified in the collection and are unassociated funerary objects. The two unassociated funerary objects are one pestle and one pestle base (Accn. #2085; Cat. #Whit–J–0016 and 0020). Thomas R. Garth also excavated Burial #10 at Sheep Island, Site #17, Benton County, WA, and removed cultural items, which were accessioned in the museum under various numbers (Cat. #Whit–J–1, 4, 21, 22, and 27). The five funerary objects are two sandstone PO 00000 Frm 00111 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 smoothers, one salmon packer, one maul broken in two pieces, and one obsidian blade. Thomas R. Garth found additional cultural items at Sheep Island, Site #17, which were accessioned by the museum (Accn. #2074; Cat. #Whit–J–0006, 0017, and 0127). No documentation was found as to their exact provenience. However, the cultural items were found in the cemetery area and are consistent with the type of funerary objects found during burial excavations at the site. The three unassociated funerary objects are one chopper, one hand adze, and one canoe weight. On November 15, 1949, cultural items were found at Garth’s Site #19 on the East end of Berrian Island, Benton County, WA. It was reported that this area is the same area that H.D. Osborne of the University of Washington and Smithsonian Institute excavated in the summer of 1949, where graves were excavated (Hogben, 1950). On November 25, 1949, Thomas R. Garth revisited the site and found a cremation area with burned artifacts and human bone. Most of the cremation artifacts removed by Garth were at Whitman Mission and were probably repatriated in 1992. Because of the prevalence of human remains on Berrian Island, and Thomas Garth’s excavation of the cremation area, the cultural items are reasonably believed to be unassociated funerary objects. The three unassociated funerary objects are three adzes. (#Whit–J–0100, Whit–J–0130, Whit–J– 0132) The determination of cultural affiliation of the unassociated funerary objects described above has been based upon geographic, archeological, historical, ethnological, and linguistic evidence, as well as the oral tradition and kinship traditions of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. Officials of the Northwest Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the 135 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. Officials of the Northwest Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Dr. Nina Lerman, Northwest Museum, Whitman College, 345 Boyer Ave, Walla Walla, WA 99362, telephone (509) 527- 5798, before September 12, 2008. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Northwest Museum is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon that this notice has been published. Dated: July 14, 2008. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18677 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Hastings, NE National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History (Hastings Museum), Hastings, NE. The human remains were removed from Stanley Mound, also known as Parkin site (3CS29), Cross County, AR. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Hastings Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Stanley Mound in Cross County, AR. The human remains were donated to the Hastings Museum by an unknown donor and cataloged into the collection between 1926 and 1931. No known VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:38 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 individual was identified. Museum records state that three pottery vessels were found with the human remains, but they were not accessioned into the collection. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains are of Native American descent. Dental attrition is consistent with an individual from the Mississippian period. Research provided by the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, conducted through the Arkansas Archeological Survey, indicate that Stanley Mound is also known as the Parkin site (3CS29). The Parkin site was first excavated in 1879 and sits on land once owned by John Stanley (for which the mound was named). The site is one of the best preserved villages from the Mississippian period. The Parkin site is a fortified village located on the St. Francis River in northeastern Arkansas. The site consists of several mounds, and plazas surrounded by rows of houses. The site has yielded thousands of artifacts, including potsherds and complete grave pottery. Although the pottery was not accessioned into the Hastings Museum collection, the records show that they are consistent with other funerary objects found at the Parkin site. Researchers suggest that the Parkin site represents a late Mississippian chiefdom to the early Protohistoric Period, an era spanning from A.D. 1350 to 1600. The site is believed to be the village of Casqui, which was visited by Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto. French documents dating to circa A.D. 1700, indicate that the Quapaw were the only people to have villages along the St. Francis River in eastern Arkansas. Quapaw oral tradition supports this documentation. Officials of the Hastings Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Hastings Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Teresa Kreutzer-Hodson, Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History, PO Box 11286, Hastings, NE 68902, telephone (402) 461–2399, before September 12, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma PO 00000 Frm 00112 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 47237 may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Hastings Museum is responsible for notifying the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: July 22, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18674 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA National Park Service. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from San Louis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and Ventura Counties, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. An assessment of the human remains, catalogue records, and relevant associated documents was made by the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. In 1928, human remains representing a minimum of 22 individuals (10 catalogue records) were removed from CA-SBa–1, also known as Olson’s Site 6, a site located on the north bank of Rincon Creek at Rincon Point, approximately three miles southeast of Carpinteria in Santa Barbara County, CA, by Ronald L. Olson. The human remains and archeological materials were accessioned into the Phoebe A. E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 157 (Wednesday, August 13, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 47235-47237]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-18677]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum, 
Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Northwest Museum, 
Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA, that meet the definition of 
``unassociated funerary objects'' under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25

[[Page 47236]]

U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not 
responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    In 1901, cultural items were removed from the southwestern corner 
of First and Birch Streets, Walla Walla, Walla Walla County, WA, during 
excavation of a house foundation. The cultural items were accessioned 
to the museum in 1946 (Cat. WHIT-O-11 and WHIT-O-12). 
The 104 unassociated funerary objects are 104 various beads.
    Museum records state that the beads were removed from a grave, but 
there is no record of disposition of the human remains. The land 
occupied by the city of Walla Walla is within the ceded lands of the 
Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. It was 
used as a wintering ground, habitation area, hunting, fishing and food 
gathering area by the Weyiiletpuu (Cayuse) and Waluulapam (Walla 
Walla). The Weyiiletpuu (Cayuse) and Waluulapam (Walla Walla) are 
members of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, 
Oregon.
    On November 27, 1948, cultural items were removed from a burial at 
Canoe Island, Site 10, Umatilla County, OR, Dr. Melvin Jacobs, 
Curator of the Museum of History and Art at Whitman College, and Thomas 
R. Garth, Jr., archeologist for the National Park Service Whitman 
Monument. The human remains were collected, but are not currently in 
the museum collection. The 11 unassociated funerary objects are 3 net 
sinkers, 2 scrapers, 1 chert flake, 1 knife, 1 bone awl, 1 bone needle, 
1 bone point, and 1 sandstone smoother. (Cat. WHIT-J-8, 11, 
12, 17, 88, 90, 91, 99, 101, 102, and 104)
    Canoe Island is currently inundated by Lake Wallula, behind McNary 
Dam. It was an important fishing site of the Imatalamlama (Umatilla) 
and Waluulapam, and opposite the fishing camp of Pusim. The islands in 
the Columbia River were also used for refuge during invasion from 
hostile enemies. Canoe Island is within the ceded lands of the 
Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon.
    On October 16, 1949, cultural items were removed from Cremation Pit 
1 at Rabbit Island, Site 18, 45BN15, Benton County, 
WA. The human remains from Cremation Pit 1 were repatriated to 
the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon in 
1992. The cultural items were identified in the collection and are now 
unassociated funerary objects. The three unassociated funerary objects 
are one clamshell, one obsidian point, and one small piece of basalt 
(Cat. Whit-J-124 to Whit-J-126).
    Rabbit Island was on the Homly Channel of the Columbia River and 
was an important burial site and habitation area for the Waluulapam. It 
was also near two important salmon and eel fishing sites known as 
Tomist-pa and Khus-us-tenim-tala-wit. Today, the island is inundated by 
Lake Wallula, behind McNary Dam and is within the ceded lands of the 
Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon.
    In 1949, Thomas R. Garth excavated at the PeoPeoMoxMox Village 
Site, 45WW6, Burial 2, at Waluula, Walla Walla County, WA. The burial 
is circa A.D. 1845-1855. The human remains were most likely repatriated 
to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon 
in 1992. The cultural items were identified in the collection and are 
now unassociated funerary objects. The three unassociated funerary 
objects are three child-sized copper bracelets (Accn. J-2 and 
1935; Cat. Whit-J-089).
    Waluula was an important permanent village of the Waluulapam. The 
village is currently inundated by Lake Wallula, behind McNary Dam, 
which is within the ceded lands of the Confederated Tribes of the 
Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon.
    On November 13, 1949, cultural items were removed from Burial 
4 at 45BN55 Sheep Island, Site 17, Benton County, WA, 
by Thomas R. Garth. The one unassociated funerary object is a granite 
pestle (Accn. J306, 2086; Cat. WHIT-J-15).
    Sheep Island was an important burial island for the Imatalamlama, 
and is currently inundated behind McNary Dam and within the ceded lands 
of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon.
    On December 3, 1949, Thomas R. Garth and others excavated Sheep 
Island, Site 17, Burial 8, Benton County, WA. The human 
remains were repatriated to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla 
Indian Reservation, Oregon in 1992. The cultural items were identified 
in the collection and are unassociated funerary objects. The two 
unassociated funerary objects are one pestle and one pestle base (Accn. 
2085; Cat. Whit-J-0016 and 0020).
    Thomas R. Garth also excavated Burial 10 at Sheep Island, 
Site 17, Benton County, WA, and removed cultural items, which 
were accessioned in the museum under various numbers (Cat. 
Whit-J-1, 4, 21, 22, and 27). The five funerary objects are 
two sandstone smoothers, one salmon packer, one maul broken in two 
pieces, and one obsidian blade.
    Thomas R. Garth found additional cultural items at Sheep Island, 
Site 17, which were accessioned by the museum (Accn. 
2074; Cat. Whit-J-0006, 0017, and 0127). No 
documentation was found as to their exact provenience. However, the 
cultural items were found in the cemetery area and are consistent with 
the type of funerary objects found during burial excavations at the 
site. The three unassociated funerary objects are one chopper, one hand 
adze, and one canoe weight.
    On November 15, 1949, cultural items were found at Garth's Site 
19 on the East end of Berrian Island, Benton County, WA. It 
was reported that this area is the same area that H.D. Osborne of the 
University of Washington and Smithsonian Institute excavated in the 
summer of 1949, where graves were excavated (Hogben, 1950). On November 
25, 1949, Thomas R. Garth revisited the site and found a cremation area 
with burned artifacts and human bone. Most of the cremation artifacts 
removed by Garth were at Whitman Mission and were probably repatriated 
in 1992. Because of the prevalence of human remains on Berrian Island, 
and Thomas Garth's excavation of the cremation area, the cultural items 
are reasonably believed to be unassociated funerary objects. The three 
unassociated funerary objects are three adzes. (Whit-J-0100, 
Whit-J-0130, Whit-J-0132)
    The determination of cultural affiliation of the unassociated 
funerary objects described above has been based upon geographic, 
archeological, historical, ethnological, and linguistic evidence, as 
well as the oral tradition and kinship traditions of the Confederated 
Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon.
    Officials of the Northwest Museum have determined that, pursuant to 
25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the 135 cultural items described above are 
reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human 
remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or 
ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have 
been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American 
individual. Officials of the Northwest Museum also have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared 
group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated 
funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian 
Reservation, Oregon.

[[Page 47237]]

    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should 
contact Dr. Nina Lerman, Northwest Museum, Whitman College, 345 Boyer 
Ave, Walla Walla, WA 99362, telephone (509) 527- 5798, before September 
12, 2008. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the 
Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon may 
proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    Northwest Museum is responsible for notifying the Confederated 
Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon that this notice has 
been published.

    Dated: July 14, 2008.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-18677 Filed 8-12-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S