Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 47234-47235 [E8-18673]

Download as PDF ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES 47234 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices collection of human remains and other anthropological and natural history collections, including the remains of these two individuals. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Museum records on the human remains are derived from Mr. Crane’s notes (written directly onto the human remains) and the original information written into the museum’s accession ledger at the time of acquisition. The museum records indicate that the human remains may be of mixed NativeEuropean ancestry, suggesting a postcontact date. In 1977, further examination by a bio-anthropologist found that the human remains were consistent with a mixture of European and Native American descent. In 2008, a professional anthropology consultant examined the human remains to ensure that they were Native American and/or of mixed Native American and European descent, and concluded they did exhibit physical characteristics of a Native American individual, but that they were not so clearly exclusive that mixed Native American-European ancestry could be ruled out. Museum records also indicated that the provenience was ‘‘old Mackinac, Michigan.’’ It is uncertain whether the exact provenience was Mackinac Island or the vicinity of Mackinaw City, as both of these locations were listed on later records, however, both Mackinaw City and Mackinac Island are in the tribal homeland of the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan. Historical evidence provided to the museum by the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians establishes the Mackinac area as ancestral land of the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians since before the arrival of the first European settlers to the area in the 1670s. The same documentation also provided evidence of occurrences of inter-marriage between people of Native American and European descent. Based on museum records, collector’s notes, consultation evidence, and extensive examination of the human remains, The Public Museum reasonably believes the human remains are of Native American ancestry and have a shared group relationship with the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan. Officials of The Public Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of The Public Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:38 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 between the Native American human remains and the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Marilyn Merdzinski, Curator of Collections and Preservation, The Public Museum, 272 Pearl St NW, Grand Rapids, MI 49504, telephone (616) 456–3521, before September 12, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Public Museum is responsible for notifying the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians, Michigan and Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan that this notice has been published. Dated: July 22, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18681 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed from Jefferson County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Burke Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hoh Indian Tribe of the Hoh Indian Reservation, Washington; Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe of Washington; Port Gamble Indian PO 00000 Frm 00109 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Community of the Port Gamble Reservation, Washington; Quileute Tribe of the Quileute Reservation Washington; and Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington. Sometime before 1952, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from south of Brinnon in Jefferson County, WA, by Sherry Berthiaume. The human remains were subsequently transferred to the Burke Museum in 1952 (Burke Accn. #3800). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains are consistent with Native American morphology and therefore have been determined to be Native American. Brinnon is within the territory of the Twana people. Twana is a dialect of the Salish language and is represented by three subgroups: Skokomish, Duhelelips, and Kolsids. The Twana are represented by the present-day Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington. Brinnon is part of the aboriginal territory of the Skokomish as defined by the 1855 Treaty of Point-No-Point. Other ethnographic and legal documentation is consistent with this determination (Indian Claims Commission; Elmendorf 1960; Mooney 1896; Handbook of North American Indians 1990; Smith 1940). Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9- 10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195–3010, telephone (206) 685–2282, before September 12, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying the Hoh Indian Tribe of the Hoh Indian Reservation, Washington; Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe of Washington; Port Gamble Indian Community of the Port Gamble Reservation, Washington; Quileute E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 157 / Wednesday, August 13, 2008 / Notices Tribe of the Quileute Reservation, Washington; and Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington that this notice has been published. Dated: July 16, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18673 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. ebenthall on PRODPC60 with NOTICES AGENCY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed from south of Three Tree Point in King County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Burke Museum and University of Washington professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe of the Muckleshoot Reservation, Washington; Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington; Snoqualmie Tribe, Washington; Suquamish Indian Tribe of the Port Madison Reservation, Washington; and Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington. In 1923, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Pleasant Beach, south of Three Tree Point in King County, WA. The human remains were found by the landowner while digging in the backyard and transferred to the King County Coroner’s Office, and subsequently transferred to the Burke Museum in 1923 (Burke Accn. ι1998). VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:38 Aug 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 47235 No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains are consistent with Native American morphology and therefore have been determined to be Native American. Three Tree Point is within the usual and accustomed territory of the Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, as defined by the 1855 Treaty of Medicine Creek. Other ethnographic and legal documentation is consistent with this determination. Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Burke Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195–3010, telephone (206) 685–2282, before September 12, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe of the Muckleshoot Reservation, Washington; Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington; Snoqualmie Tribe, Washington; Suquamish Indian Tribe of the Port Madison Reservation, Washington; and Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation, Washington that this notice has been published. will hold a meeting on Monday, September 15, 2008. The Commission was established pursuant to Public Law 99–420, Sec. 103. The purpose of the commission is to consult with the Secretary of the Interior, or his designee, on matters relating to the management and development of the park, including but not limited to the acquisition of lands and interests in lands (including conservation easements on islands) and termination of rights of use and occupancy. The meeting will convene at Park Headquarters, Bar Harbor, Maine, at 1 p.m., to consider the following agenda: Dated: July 16, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–18676 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum, Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA BILLING CODE 4312–50–S ACTION: DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Acadia National Park; Bar Harbor, Maine; Acadia National Park Advisory Commission; Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given in accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92–463, 86 Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App. 1, Sec. 10), that the Acadia National Park Advisory Commission PO 00000 Frm 00110 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 1. Committee reports: —Land Conservation —Park Use —Science and Education —Historic —Science and Education —Historic 2. Old business 3. Superintendent’s report 4. Public comments 5. Proposed agenda for next Commission meeting in February 2009. The meeting is open to the public. Interested persons may make oral/written presentations to the Commission or file written statements. Such requests should be made to the Superintendent at least seven days prior to the meeting. Further information concerning this meeting may be obtained from the Superintendent, Acadia National Park, P.O. Box 177, Bar Harbor, Maine 04609, tel: (207) 288–3338. Dated: July 19, 2008. Sheridan Steele, Superintendent. [FR Doc. E8–18573 Filed 8–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–2N–M DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Northwest Museum, Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA, that meet the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary objects’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 E:\FR\FM\13AUN1.SGM 13AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 157 (Wednesday, August 13, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 47234-47235]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-18673]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington 
State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of the 
Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), 
University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed 
from Jefferson County, WA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Burke Museum 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hoh 
Indian Tribe of the Hoh Indian Reservation, Washington; Jamestown 
S'Klallam Tribe of Washington; Port Gamble Indian Community of the Port 
Gamble Reservation, Washington; Quileute Tribe of the Quileute 
Reservation Washington; and Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish 
Reservation, Washington.
    Sometime before 1952, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from south of Brinnon in Jefferson County, WA, 
by Sherry Berthiaume. The human remains were subsequently transferred 
to the Burke Museum in 1952 (Burke Accn. 3800). No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The human remains are consistent with Native American morphology 
and therefore have been determined to be Native American. Brinnon is 
within the territory of the Twana people. Twana is a dialect of the 
Salish language and is represented by three subgroups: Skokomish, 
Duhelelips, and Kolsids. The Twana are represented by the present-day 
Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington.
    Brinnon is part of the aboriginal territory of the Skokomish as 
defined by the 1855 Treaty of Point-No-Point. Other ethnographic and 
legal documentation is consistent with this determination (Indian 
Claims Commission; Elmendorf 1960; Mooney 1896; Handbook of North 
American Indians 1990; Smith 1940).
    Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001 (9- 10), the human remains described above represent the 
physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. 
Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that 
can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and 
the Skokomish Indian Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. 
Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, 
Seattle, WA 98195-3010, telephone (206) 685-2282, before September 12, 
2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Skokomish Indian Tribe 
of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington may proceed after that date if 
no additional claimants come forward.
    The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying the Hoh Indian Tribe 
of the Hoh Indian Reservation, Washington; Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe of 
Washington; Port Gamble Indian Community of the Port Gamble 
Reservation, Washington; Quileute

[[Page 47235]]

Tribe of the Quileute Reservation, Washington; and Skokomish Indian 
Tribe of the Skokomish Reservation, Washington that this notice has 
been published.

    Dated: July 16, 2008
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-18673 Filed 8-12-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S