Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Beaver Creek Coal Bed Natural Gas Development Project, Wyoming, 43948-43949 [E8-17327]

Download as PDF 43948 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 146 / Tuesday, July 29, 2008 / Notices e-mail cary_norquist@fws.gov); and David Kampwerth at Conway, Arkansas for the cave crayfish (telephone, 501– 501–4477, e-mail david_kampwerth@fws.gov). Under the Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), the Service maintains a list of endangered and threatened wildlife and plant species at 50 CFR 17.11 (for wildlife) and 17.12 (for plants) (collectively referred to as the List). Section 4(c)(2)(A) of the Act requires that we conduct a review of listed species at least once every 5 years. Then, on the basis of such reviews, under section 4(c)(2)(B), we determine whether or not any species should be removed from the List (delisted), or reclassified from endangered to threatened or from threatened to endangered. Delisting a species must be supported by the best scientific and commercial data available and only considered if such data substantiate that the species is neither endangered nor threatened for one or more of the following reasons: (1) The species is considered extinct; (2) the species is considered to be recovered; and/or (3) the original data available when the species was listed, or the interpretation of such data, were in error. Any change in Federal classification would require a separate rulemaking process. Amendments to the List through final rules are published in the Federal Register . The regulations at 50 CFR 424.21 require that we publish a notice in the Federal Register announcing those species currently under active review. This notice announces our active review of the following species that are currently listed as endangered: vermillion darter, pygmy madtom, palezone shiner, fanshell, pink mucket, spruce-fir moss spider, cave crayfish, Pyne’s groundplum, small-anthered bittercress, leafy prairie clover, smooth coneflower, spreading avens, Roan Mountain bluet, rough-leaved loosestrife, Michaux’s sumac, and Alabama canebrake pitcher plant. The other four species in this notice are currently listed as threatened. The List is also available on our Internet site at http://endangered.fws.gov/ wildlife.html#Species. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: jlentini on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES What information is considered in the review? A 5-year review considers the best scientific and commercial data that have become available since the current listing determination or most recent status review of each species, such as: A. Species biology, including but not limited to population trends, VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:12 Jul 28, 2008 Jkt 214001 distribution, abundance, demographics, and genetics; B. Habitat conditions, including but not limited to amount, distribution, and suitability; C. Conservation measures that have been implemented to benefit the species; D. Threat status and trends (see five factors under heading ‘‘How do we determine whether a species is endangered or threatened?’’); and E. Other new information, data, or corrections, including but not limited to taxonomic or nomenclatural changes, identification of erroneous information contained in the List, and improved analytical methods. Definitions Related to This Notice We provide the following definitions to assist individuals submitting information regarding the species being reviewed: A. Species includes any species or subspecies of fish, wildlife, or plant, and any distinct population segment of any species of vertebrate which interbreeds when mature. B. Endangered means any species that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range. C. Threatened means any species that is likely to become an endangered species within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. How do we determine whether a species is endangered or threatened? warranted, then the species will remain on the List under their current status. Public Solicitation of New Information We request any new information concerning the status of any of these 20 species. See ‘‘What information is considered in the review?’’ heading for specific criteria. Information submitted should be supported by documentation such as maps, bibliographic references, methods used to gather and analyze the data, and/or copies of any pertinent publications, reports, or letters by knowledgeable sources. Our practice is to make comments, including names and home addresses of respondents, available for public review during regular business hours. Individual respondents may request that we withhold their home addresses, etc., but if you wish us to withhold this information, you must state this prominently at the beginning of your comments. In addition, you must present a rationale for withholding this information. This rationale must demonstrate that disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of privacy. Unsupported assertions will not meet this burden. In the absence of exceptional, documental circumstances, this information will be released. We will always make submissions from organizations or businesses, and from individuals identifying themselves as representatives or officials of organizations or businesses, available for public inspection in their entirety. Section 4(a)(1) of the Act establishes that we determine whether a species is endangered or threatened based on one or more of the following five factors: A. The present or threatened destruction, modification, or curtailment of its habitat or range; B. Overutilization for commercial, recreational, scientific, or educational purposes; C. Disease or predation; D. The inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms; or E. Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence. Dated: June 30, 2008. Cynthia K. Dohner, Acting Regional Director. [FR Doc. E8–17368 Filed 7–28–08; 8:45 am] What could happen as a result of this review? [WY–050–08–1310–DB] If we find that there is new information concerning any of these 20 species indicating that a change in classification may be warranted, we may propose a new rule that could do one of the following: (a) Reclassify the species from endangered to threatened (downlist); (b) reclassify the species from threatened to endangered (uplist); or (c) delist the species. If we determine that a change in classification is not Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Beaver Creek Coal Bed Natural Gas Development Project, Wyoming PO 00000 Frm 00037 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Authority This document is published under the authority of the Endangered Species Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of intent. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Lander Field Office intends to prepare an Environmental E:\FR\FM\29JYN1.SGM 29JYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 146 / Tuesday, July 29, 2008 / Notices Impact Statement (EIS) for a proposed coal bed natural gas (CBNG) development approximately 9 miles southeast of Riverton, Wyoming. The proposed development project is known as the Beaver Creek Coal Bed Natural Gas Development Project (Project), located in Fremont County, Wyoming. DATES: The BLM will announce public scoping meetings hosted in Lander and Riverton, Wyoming to identify relevant issues through local media, newsletters, individual mailings, and the BLM Web site at www.blm.gov/wy/st/en/info/ NEPA/lfodocs/beavercreek_cbng.html at least 15 days prior to each meeting. We will provide additional opportunities for public participation upon publication of the Draft EIS, including a minimum 45-day public comment period. You may submit your issues and comments related to the Beaver Creek Coal Bed Natural Gas Development Project EIS by any of the following methods: • Web Site: www.blm.gov/wy/st/en/ info/NEPA/lfodocs/ beavercreek_cbng.html. • E-mail: Curtis_Bryan@blm.gov. • Fax: 307–332–8444. • Mail: Lander Field Office, 1335 Main Street, Lander, WY 82520. Documents pertinent to this proposal may be examined at the Lander Field Office. ADDRESSES: For further information, contact Curtis Bryan, Telephone (307) 332–8400; Email: Curtis_Bryan@blm.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This document provides notice that the BLM Lander Field Office, Lander, Wyoming, intends to prepare an EIS on the potential impacts of a proposed natural gas field development, ancillary facilities, pipelines, and roads. The Beaver Creek Project area is located 9 miles southeast of the town of Riverton in Fremont County, Wyoming. The proposed Project is within the Beaver Creek Unit in Township 33 North, Range 96 West, in all or portions of Sections 1–4, 9–16, 21–23, and 28–29; Township 34, Range 96 West, in all or portions of Sections 20–28 and 33–36 (6th Principal Meridian). The Beaver Creek Project area encompasses approximately 16,515 acres. Approximately 82 percent of the Project area is public lands and Federal mineral estate administered by the BLM, with some interspersed State and private lands and other mineral estate. The Proponent, Devon Energy Production Co. LP (Devon) has submitted a proposal to drill up to 228 jlentini on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:12 Jul 28, 2008 Jkt 214001 natural gas wells, of which 208 would produce CBNG and about 20 would produce conventional natural gas. The estimated drilling and completion period would occur over the course of 5 to 10 years and the life of the project is anticipated to be between 20 and 40 years. Devon proposes to drill the CBNG wells at a density of one well every 40 acres. The proposed CBNG wells are expected to be drilled vertically and would be completed in the Mesa Verde formation, while the proposed conventional gas wells would likely be completed in the Madison and Phosphoria formations. Because the target formations are located in different geologic formations, conventional gas wells may overlap with the CBNG well density. Facilities associated with the proposed project include access roads, pipelines, overhead power lines, central production facilities, four water disposal (re-injection) wells, two evaporation ponds, and equipment storage areas. The Beaver Creek Unit has experienced extensive gas development over the last 50 years, and the Proponent would utilize existing roads and facilities to the extent practical. During the short-term, while well pads are in construction, pad size is expected to be about 2.5 acres for each the CBNG wells and about 3 acres for conventional wells. This would result in an estimated total short-term well pad disturbance of about 565 acres. Following reclamation, an estimated 390 acres of surface from well pads would be left without vegetation and disturbance. Approximately 24 miles of new access roads would be constructed with most new roads developed as laterals off existing roads. Total disturbance associated with the construction of access roads is estimated to be approximately 117 acres. These roads would be open for the life of the project. In the short-term, construction and installation of approximately 66 miles of new pipelines and overhead powerlines would disturb approximately 550 acres, most of which would be reclaimed for the long-term. Produced water from the wells would be disposed of into four proposed water disposal (re-injection) wells and two proposed evaporation ponds. The injection wells would serve as the primary method of produced water disposal. No surface discharge of produced water is proposed. During the drilling phase of the proposed project, Devon estimates that the total short-term surface disturbance would be approximately 1,280 acres. After reclamation and for the life of the proposed project, Devon estimates that PO 00000 Frm 00038 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 43949 the long-term surface disturbance would be about 550 acres. Major issues identified at this time include: Potential impacts to air quality; disposal of produced waste water; and the potential effects of development and production on surface resources including vegetation, cultural resources, and wildlife habitat. In addition to the proposed action and the no action alternatives, other alternatives may be developed. These may include: An alternative that considers less than 228 wells; an alternative that considers re-injection of some or all produced water; and an alternative that would eliminate the need for overhead power lines by requiring the proponent to bury all power lines. Martin G. Griffith, Acting State Director. [FR Doc. E8–17327 Filed 7–28–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–22–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [ID–300–1020–PH; DDG080004] Notice of Public Meeting, Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council Meeting Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. AGENCY: SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Idaho Falls District Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will meet as indicated below. DATES: The RAC will next meet in Dubois and Idaho Falls, Idaho on September 10–11, 2008 for a two day field tour. The group will meet at the new Dubois Fire Station, Clark Ave, Dubois, Idaho starting at 10 a.m. The second day the group will be meeting at the Idaho Falls BLM Office, 1405 Hollipark Drive, Idaho Falls, Idaho at 8 a.m. followed by a tour to the desert. Meeting topics include noxious weeds, power line corridors, Snake River Activity Operations Plan, Upper Snake RMP and fire. Other topics will be scheduled as appropriate. All meetings are open to the public. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The 15member Council advises the Secretary of the Interior, through the Bureau of Land Management, on a variety of planning and management issues E:\FR\FM\29JYN1.SGM 29JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 146 (Tuesday, July 29, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 43948-43949]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-17327]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Bureau of Land Management

[WY-050-08-1310-DB]


Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for 
the Beaver Creek Coal Bed Natural Gas Development Project, Wyoming

AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of intent.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Lander Field Office 
intends to prepare an Environmental

[[Page 43949]]

Impact Statement (EIS) for a proposed coal bed natural gas (CBNG) 
development approximately 9 miles southeast of Riverton, Wyoming. The 
proposed development project is known as the Beaver Creek Coal Bed 
Natural Gas Development Project (Project), located in Fremont County, 
Wyoming.

DATES: The BLM will announce public scoping meetings hosted in Lander 
and Riverton, Wyoming to identify relevant issues through local media, 
newsletters, individual mailings, and the BLM Web site at www.blm.gov/
wy/st/en/info/NEPA/lfodocs/beavercreek_cbng.html at least 15 days 
prior to each meeting. We will provide additional opportunities for 
public participation upon publication of the Draft EIS, including a 
minimum 45-day public comment period.

ADDRESSES: You may submit your issues and comments related to the 
Beaver Creek Coal Bed Natural Gas Development Project EIS by any of the 
following methods:
     Web Site: www.blm.gov/wy/st/en/info/NEPA/lfodocs/
beavercreek_cbng.html.
     E-mail: Curtis_Bryan@blm.gov.
     Fax: 307-332-8444.
     Mail: Lander Field Office, 1335 Main Street, Lander, WY 
82520.
    Documents pertinent to this proposal may be examined at the Lander 
Field Office.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For further information, contact 
Curtis Bryan, Telephone (307) 332-8400; E-mail: Curtis_Bryan@blm.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This document provides notice that the BLM 
Lander Field Office, Lander, Wyoming, intends to prepare an EIS on the 
potential impacts of a proposed natural gas field development, 
ancillary facilities, pipelines, and roads. The Beaver Creek Project 
area is located 9 miles southeast of the town of Riverton in Fremont 
County, Wyoming. The proposed Project is within the Beaver Creek Unit 
in Township 33 North, Range 96 West, in all or portions of Sections 1-
4, 9-16, 21-23, and 28-29; Township 34, Range 96 West, in all or 
portions of Sections 20-28 and 33-36 (6th Principal Meridian). The 
Beaver Creek Project area encompasses approximately 16,515 acres. 
Approximately 82 percent of the Project area is public lands and 
Federal mineral estate administered by the BLM, with some interspersed 
State and private lands and other mineral estate.
    The Proponent, Devon Energy Production Co. LP (Devon) has submitted 
a proposal to drill up to 228 natural gas wells, of which 208 would 
produce CBNG and about 20 would produce conventional natural gas. The 
estimated drilling and completion period would occur over the course of 
5 to 10 years and the life of the project is anticipated to be between 
20 and 40 years. Devon proposes to drill the CBNG wells at a density of 
one well every 40 acres. The proposed CBNG wells are expected to be 
drilled vertically and would be completed in the Mesa Verde formation, 
while the proposed conventional gas wells would likely be completed in 
the Madison and Phosphoria formations. Because the target formations 
are located in different geologic formations, conventional gas wells 
may overlap with the CBNG well density. Facilities associated with the 
proposed project include access roads, pipelines, overhead power lines, 
central production facilities, four water disposal (re-injection) 
wells, two evaporation ponds, and equipment storage areas. The Beaver 
Creek Unit has experienced extensive gas development over the last 50 
years, and the Proponent would utilize existing roads and facilities to 
the extent practical. During the short-term, while well pads are in 
construction, pad size is expected to be about 2.5 acres for each the 
CBNG wells and about 3 acres for conventional wells. This would result 
in an estimated total short-term well pad disturbance of about 565 
acres. Following reclamation, an estimated 390 acres of surface from 
well pads would be left without vegetation and disturbance. 
Approximately 24 miles of new access roads would be constructed with 
most new roads developed as laterals off existing roads. Total 
disturbance associated with the construction of access roads is 
estimated to be approximately 117 acres. These roads would be open for 
the life of the project. In the short-term, construction and 
installation of approximately 66 miles of new pipelines and overhead 
powerlines would disturb approximately 550 acres, most of which would 
be reclaimed for the long-term.
    Produced water from the wells would be disposed of into four 
proposed water disposal (re-injection) wells and two proposed 
evaporation ponds. The injection wells would serve as the primary 
method of produced water disposal. No surface discharge of produced 
water is proposed.
    During the drilling phase of the proposed project, Devon estimates 
that the total short-term surface disturbance would be approximately 
1,280 acres. After reclamation and for the life of the proposed 
project, Devon estimates that the long-term surface disturbance would 
be about 550 acres.
    Major issues identified at this time include: Potential impacts to 
air quality; disposal of produced waste water; and the potential 
effects of development and production on surface resources including 
vegetation, cultural resources, and wildlife habitat.
    In addition to the proposed action and the no action alternatives, 
other alternatives may be developed. These may include: An alternative 
that considers less than 228 wells; an alternative that considers re-
injection of some or all produced water; and an alternative that would 
eliminate the need for overhead power lines by requiring the proponent 
to bury all power lines.

Martin G. Griffith,
Acting State Director.
 [FR Doc. E8-17327 Filed 7-28-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-22-P