Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines, Fuel Injected Reciprocating Engines, 39574-39577 [E8-14734]

Download as PDF 39574 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 133 / Thursday, July 10, 2008 / Rules and Regulations Differences Between This AD and the MCAI AD DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (f) This AD differs from the MCAI as follows: (1) The MCAI states ‘‘When damage or cracks are found, before next flight, contact the TC Holder for further instructions.’’ If a crack is found, this AD requires repairing the crack before further flight in accordance with an FAA-approved procedure. (2) This AD requires that the inspection be performed based on ‘‘hours time-in-service’’ not ‘‘flight hours.’’ Federal Aviation Administration Other Information (g) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs): The Manager, Safety Management Group, FAA, FAA, ATTN: Sharon Miles, Aviation Safety Engineer, FAA, Rotorcraft Directorate, Regulations and Guidance Group, Fort Worth, Texas 76193–0111, telephone (817) 222–5122, fax (817) 222– 5961, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. Related Information (h) European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) Airworthiness Directive No. 2006– 0357, dated November 29, 2006, contains related information. Air Transport Association of America (ATA) Tracking Code (i) ATA Code 5700: Fuselage frame middle section. Material Incorporated by Reference mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with RULES (j) You must use the specified portions of Agusta Bollettino Tecnico No. 139–018, Revision B, dated October 18, 2006, to do the actions required. (1) The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of this service information under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (2) For service information identified in this AD, contact Agusta, 21017 Cascina Costa di Samarate (VA) Italy, Via Giovanni Agusta 520, telephone 39 (0331) 229111, fax 39 (0331) 229605–222595. (3) You may review copies at the FAA, Office of the Regional Counsel, Southwest Region, 2601 Meacham Blvd., Fort Worth, Texas 76193; or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call (202) 741–6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/ cfr/ibr-locations.html. Issued in Fort Worth, Texas on June 19, 2008. Judy Carl, Acting Manager, Rotorcraft Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. E8–14720 Filed 7–9–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:54 Jul 09, 2008 Jkt 214001 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2007–0218; Directorate Identifier 92–ANE–56–AD; Amendment 39– 15602; AD 2008–14–07] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines, Fuel Injected Reciprocating Engines Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for certain fuel injected reciprocating engines manufactured by Lycoming Engines. That AD currently requires inspection, and replacement if necessary, of externally mounted fuel injector fuel lines. This AD requires the same actions but adds additional engine models and clarifies certain compliance time wording. This AD also exempts engines that have a Maintenance and Overhaul Manual with an Airworthiness Limitations Section that requires inspection and replacement, if necessary, of externally mounted fuel injector lines. This AD results from Lycoming Engines revising their Mandatory Service Bulletin to add new engine models requiring inspection, and from the need to clarify a repetitive inspection compliance time. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the fuel injector fuel lines that would allow fuel to spray into the engine compartment, resulting in an engine fire. DATES: This AD becomes effective August 14, 2008. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in the regulations as of August 14, 2008. ADDRESSES: You can get the service information identified in this AD from Lycoming Engines, 652 Oliver Street, Williamsport, PA 17701, or go to http://www.lycoming.textron.com. The Docket Operations office is located at Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, Washington, DC 20590–0001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Norm Perenson, Aerospace Engineer, New York Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 1600 Stewart Avenue, Suite 410, PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Westbury, NY 11590; e-mail: Norman.perenson@faa.gov; telephone (516) 228–7337; fax (516) 794–5531. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FAA proposed to amend 14 CFR part 39 by superseding AD 2002–26–01, Amendment 39–12986 (67 FR 78965, December 27, 2002), with a proposed AD. The proposed AD applies to certain fuel injected reciprocating engines manufactured by Lycoming Engines. We published the proposed AD in the Federal Register on January 2, 2008 (73 FR 87). That action proposed to: • Require the same actions as AD 2002–26–01; and • Add additional engine models, clarify certain compliance time wording; and • Exempt engines that have a Maintenance and Overhaul Manual with an Airworthiness Limitations Section that requires inspection and replacement, if necessary, of externally mounted fuel injector lines. Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http:// www.regulations.gov; or in person at the Docket Operations office between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this AD, the regulatory evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The street address for the Docket Operations office (telephone (800) 647–5527) is provided in the ADDRESSES section. Comments will be available in the AD docket shortly after receipt. Comments We provided the public the opportunity to participate in the development of this AD. We have considered the comments received. One commenter, a private citizen, states that in the proposed AD, we wish to exempt engines that have a maintenance manual that deals with this subject. He asks how the mechanic is to know if an engine has a maintenance manual, if the mechanic does not have access to that manual, unless we list the specific engines that are not applicable to the proposed AD. He states that we should either make the AD applicable to fuel injected Lycoming Engines and then list the applicable and nonapplicable engines, or do not change the AD. We do not agree. If the engine has an ‘‘I’’ in the prefix of the engine model and the engine has external fuel lines, the fuel lines require inspection. For engines that have a Maintenance Manual, the required inspection will be described in the Airworthiness E:\FR\FM\10JYR1.SGM 10JYR1 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 133 / Thursday, July 10, 2008 / Rules and Regulations mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with RULES Limitations Section (ALS) in the engine’s Maintenance Manual. For engines that do not have a Maintenance Manual, the required inspection will be described in this AD and Lycoming Mandatory Service Bulletin No. 342E. The mechanic is required to have the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness when performing maintenance (refer to 14 CFR 43.13). Having the manual or access to the manual, of an airplane or engine undergoing maintenance is just as important as having the proper tools to perform the maintenance on an aircraft or engine. We added language in paragraph (e) to clarify that engine models with an ALS are not included in Table 1 and therefore are exempted from compliance with this AD. One commenter, a private citizen, states that the proposed AD should be expanded to include any other certified engines utilizing the same fuel injection setup and parts as the Lycoming engines. One example is the Jacobs R– 755 engine that can be converted to a fuel injection system via Supplemental Type Certificate held by Radial Engines, LTD. This installation uses a modified IO–720 fuel injection system, including the same fuel injection lines that are the subject of the AD. We do not agree. The unsafe condition for this AD is the lack of proper maintenance of the fuel injector lines and support clamps. The unsafe condition is not a problem with the design or manufacture of fuel injector lines. Some of the clamps are difficult to install on the fuel injector lines and then to the engine, resulting in support clamps being omitted during field overhaul or repair. The support clamps dampen fuel line vibration due to the impact of cooling air and vibration from the aircraft/engine. When the lines and clamps are accessible and support clamp installation is easier, as in the case of the Jacobs R–755 engine, the clamps are properly installed and there has not been a reported problem. Since there has not been a reported problem with the fuel injector lines on the R–755 engine, or any other engine, there is no reason to include any other engine in the AD. We did not change the AD. Conclusion We have carefully reviewed the available data, including the comments received, and determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting the AD as proposed. Costs of Compliance We estimate that 17,740 engines installed on aircraft of U.S. registry will be affected by this AD. We also estimate VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:54 Jul 09, 2008 Jkt 214001 that it will take about 1 work-hour to inspect and replace all lines on a fourcylinder engine, 1.5 work-hours to inspect and replace all lines on a sixcylinder engine, and 2 work-hours to inspect and replace all lines on an eightcylinder engine. We also estimate that the average labor rate is $80 per workhour. Required parts will cost about $484 for a four-cylinder engine, $726 for a six-cylinder engine, and $968 for an eight-cylinder engine. Based on these figures, the total cost per airplane of the AD to U.S. operators is estimated as follows: • $564 for a four-cylinder engine. • $846 for a six-cylinder engine. • $1,128 for an eight-cylinder engine. We estimate the total cost to U.S. operators to be $11,062,860. Special Flight Permits Paragraph Removed Paragraph (e) of the superseded AD, AD 2002–26–01, contains a paragraph pertaining to special flight permits. Even though this final rule does not contain a similar paragraph, we have made no changes with regard to the use of special flight permits to operate the airplane to a repair facility to do the work required by this AD. In July 2002, we published a new Part 39 that contains a general authority regarding special flight permits and airworthiness directives. See Docket No. FAA–2004– 8460, Amendment 39–9474 (69 FR 47998, July 22, 2002). Thus, when we now supersede ADs we will not include a specific paragraph on special flight permits unless we want to limit the use of that general authority granted in section 39.23. Regulatory Findings We have determined that this AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; (2) Is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. We prepared a summary of the costs to comply with this AD and placed it in the AD Docket. You may get a copy of this summary at the address listed under ADDRESSES. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. Adoption of the Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the Federal Aviation Administration amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows: I PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: I Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, section 44701, ‘‘General requirements.’’ Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this rulemaking action. PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 39575 Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 [Amended] 2. The FAA amends § 39.13 by removing Amendment 39–12986 (67 FR 78965, December 27, 2002), and by adding a new airworthiness directive, Amendment 39–15602, to read as follows: I 2008–14–07 Lycoming Engines (formerly Textron Lycoming Division, AVCO Corporation): Amendment 39–15602. Docket No. FAA–2007–0218; Directorate Identifier 92–ANE–56–AD. Effective Date (a) This airworthiness directive (AD) becomes effective August 14, 2008. Affected ADs (b) This AD supersedes AD 2002–26–01, Amendment 39–12986. Applicability (c) This AD applies to fuel injected reciprocating engines manufactured by E:\FR\FM\10JYR1.SGM 10JYR1 39576 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 133 / Thursday, July 10, 2008 / Rules and Regulations Lycoming Engines that incorporate externally mounted fuel injection lines (engines with an ‘‘I’’ in the prefix of the engine model designation) as listed in the following Table 1: TABLE 1.—ENGINE MODELS AFFECTED Engine Model AEIO–320 ........................... AIO–320 ............................. IO–320 ................................ LIO–320 .............................. AEIO–360 ........................... AIO–360 ............................. HIO–360 ............................. IO–360 ................................ –D1B, –D2B, –E1B, –E2B. –A1B, –BIB, –C1B. –B1A, –B1C, –C1A, –D1A, –D1B, –E1A, –E1B, –E2A, –E2B. –B1A, –C1A. –A1A, –A1B, –A1B6, –A1D, –A1E, –A1E6, –B1F, –B2F, –B1G6, –B1H, –B4A, –H1A, –H1B. –A1A, –A1B, –B1B. –A1A, –A1B, –B1A, –C1A, –C1B, –D1A, –E1AD, –E1BD, –F1AD, –G1A. –A1A, –A1B, –A1B6, –A1B6D, –A1C, –A1D, –A1D6, –A2A, –A2B, –A3B6, –A3B6D, –B1B, –B1D, –B1E, –B1F, –B1G6, –B2F, –B2F6, –B4A, –C1A, –C1B, –C1C, –C1C6, –C1D6, –C1E6, –C1F, –C1G6, –C2G6, –F1A, –J1A6D, –M1B, –L2A, –M1A. –A1A. –C1E6. –A1B, –C1A6D. –A1B6. –D4A5, –D4B5, –D4D5, –L1B5, –L1B5D, –L1D5. –B1A, –B1C. –A1A5, –AA1A5, –AA1B5, –AB1A5, –AC1A5, –AE1A5, –B1A5, –B1C5, –C1B5, –C4B5, –C4D5D, –D4A5, –E1A5, –E1B5, –G1A5, –G1B5, –G1C5, –G1D5, –G1E5, –G1F5, –J4A5, –V4A5D, –K1A5, –K1A5D, –K1B5, –K1C5, –K1D5, –K1E5, –K1E5D, –K1F5, –K1H5, –K1J5, –K1F5D, –K1G5, –K1G5D, –K1H5, –K1J5D, –K1K5, –K1E5, –K1E5D, –K1F5, –K1J5, –L1C5, –M1A5, –M1B5D, –M1C5, –N1A5, –P1A5, –R1A5, –S1A5, –T4A5D, –T4B5, –T4B5D, –T4C5D, –V4A5, –V4A5D, –W1A5, –W1A5D, –W3A5D. –A1A. –F2BD, –J2B, –J2BD, –N2BD, –R2AD, –U2A, –V2AD, –W2A. –A1A, –A1B, –A2A, –A2B, –A2C, –AE1A5, –AE2A, –AH1A, –AA1AD, –AF1A, –AF1B, –AG1A, –AB1AD, –AB1BD, –AH1A, –AJ1A, –AK1A, –C1A, –E1A, –G1A, –F2BD, –J2B, –J2BD, –N2BD, –R2AD, –S1AD, –U2A, –V2AD, –W2A. –A2A. –A1A, –A1B, –D1B, –D1BD, –D1C, –D1CD, –B1B, –B1BD, –C1B. IVO–360 ............................. LIO–360 .............................. TIO–360 .............................. IGO–480 ............................. AEIO–540 ........................... IGO–540 ............................. IO–540 ................................ IVO–540 ............................. LTIO–540 ............................ TIO–540 .............................. TIVO–540 ........................... IO–720 ................................ Engine models in Table 1 are installed on, but not limited to, Piper PA–24 Comanche, PA–30 and PA–39 Twin Comanche, PA–28 Arrow, and PA–23 Aztec; Beech 23 Musketeer; Mooney 20, and Cessna 177 Cardinal airplanes. (d) This AD is not applicable to engines having internally mounted fuel injection lines, which are not accessible. (e) This AD is not applicable to engines that have a Maintenance and Overhaul Manual with an Airworthiness Limitations Section that requires inspection of externally mounted fuel injector lines. Those engines models are not included in Table 1 of this AD. mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with RULES Unsafe Condition (f) This AD results from Lycoming Engines revising their Mandatory Service Bulletin (MSB) to add new engine models requiring inspection, and from the need to clarify a repetitive inspection compliance time. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the fuel injector fuel lines that would allow fuel to spray into the engine compartment, resulting in an engine fire. Compliance (g) You are responsible for having the actions required by this AD performed within the compliance times specified unless the actions have already been done. Engines That Have Had Initial Inspections (h) For engines that have had initial inspections in accordance with Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342, dated March 24, VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:54 Jul 09, 2008 Jkt 214001 1972; Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342A, dated May 26, 1992; Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342B, dated October 22, 1993; Supplement No. 1 to MSB No. 342B, dated April 27, 1999; Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342C, dated April 28, 2000; Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342D, dated July 10, 2001; and Lycoming Engines MSB No. 342E, dated May 18, 2004, inspect in accordance with paragraph (j) of this AD. Repetitive Inspections Engines That Have Not Had Initial Inspections (k) Inspect the fuel injector fuel lines and clamps between the fuel manifold and the fuel injector nozzles, and replace as necessary any fuel injector fuel line and clamp that does not meet all conditions specified in Lycoming Engines MSB No. 342E, dated May 18, 2004. (i) For engines that have not had initial inspections previously done in accordance with Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342, dated March 24, 1972; Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342A, dated May 26, 1992; Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342B, dated October 22, 1993; Supplement No. 1 to MSB No. 342B, dated April 27, 1999; Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342C, dated April 28, 2000; Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342D, dated July 10, 2001; or Lycoming Engines MSD No. 342E, dated May 18, 2004, inspect as follows: (1) For engines that have not yet had any fuel line maintenance done, or have not had any fuel line maintenance done since new or since the last overhaul, inspect in accordance with paragraph (k) of this AD within 50 hours time-in-service (TIS) after the effective date of this AD. (2) For all other engines, inspect in accordance with paragraph (k) of this AD within 10 hours TIS after the effective date of this AD. PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 (j) Thereafter, inspect at intervals of 100 hours TIS (not to exceed 110 hours), at each engine overhaul, and after any maintenance has been done on the engine where any clamp (or clamps) on a fuel injector line (or lines) has been disconnected, moved, or loosened, in accordance with paragraph (k) of this AD. Inspection Criteria Alternative Methods of Compliance (l) The Manager, New York Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, has the authority to approve alternative methods of compliance for this AD if requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. Related Information (m) FAA Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin No. NE–07–49, dated September 20, 2007, is not mandatory, but has additional information on this subject. (n) Contact Norm Perenson, Aerospace Engineer, New York Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 1600 Stewart Avenue, Suite 410, Westbury, NY 11590; e-mail: Norman.perenson@faa.gov; telephone (516) E:\FR\FM\10JYR1.SGM 10JYR1 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 133 / Thursday, July 10, 2008 / Rules and Regulations 228–7337; fax (516) 794–5531, for more information about this AD. Material Incorporated by Reference (o) You must use Lycoming Engines Mandatory Service Bulletin No. 342E, dated May 18, 2004, to perform the actions required by this AD. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of this service bulletin in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Contact Lycoming Engines, 652 Oliver Street, Williamsport, PA 17701, or go to http://www.lycoming.textron.com for a copy of this service information. You may review copies at the FAA, New England Region, 12 New England Executive Park, Burlington, MA; or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202–741–6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/ cfr/ibr-locations.html. Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on June 24, 2008. Peter A. White, Assistant Manager, Engine and Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. E8–14734 Filed 7–9–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2008–0040; Directorate Identifier 2007–SW–13–AD; Amendment 39– 15598; AD 2008–14–03] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Model 206A, 206B, 206L, 206L–1, 206L–3, and 206L–4 Helicopters Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the specified Bell Helicopter Textron Canada (BHTC) Model 206A, 206B, 206L, 206L–1, 206L–3, and 206L–4 helicopters. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) originated by an aviation authority to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The aviation authority of Canada, with which we have a bilateral agreement, states in the MCAI: ‘‘It has been determined that some helicopters have been fitted with a CRES steel fitting, part number (P/N) 407–030–750–103, and the installation of the tailboom attachment bolt does not meet the design criteria.’’ We are issuing mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with RULES SUMMARY: VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:54 Jul 09, 2008 Jkt 214001 this AD to require actions that are intended to address the unsafe condition that results from an improper installation of the tailboom attachment bolt in the upper left-hand tailboom attachment CRES steel fitting. This AD becomes effective on August 14, 2008. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in this AD as of August 14, 2008. DATES: You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http:// regulations.gov or in person at the Docket Operations office, U.S. Department of Transportation, M–30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. You may get the service information identified in this AD from BHTC, 12,800 Rue de l’Avenir, Mirabel, Quebec J7J1R4, telephone (450) 437–2862 or (800) 363–8023, fax (450) 433–0272. Examining the AD Docket: The AD docket contains the Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM), the economic evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The street address and operating hours for the Docket Operations office (telephone (800) 647– 5227) are in the ADDRESSES section of this AD. Comments will be available in the AD docket shortly after they are received. ADDRESSES: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sharon Miles, Aviation Safety Engineer, FAA, Rotorcraft Directorate, Regulations and Policy Group, Fort Worth, Texas 76193–0111, telephone (817) 222–5122, fax (817) 222–5961. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion We issued an NPRM to amend 14 CFR part 39 to include an AD that would apply to the specified products. That NPRM was published in the Federal Register on January 23, 2008 (73 FR 3887). That NPRM proposed to correct an unsafe condition for the specified products which results from an improper installation of the tailboom attachment bolt in the upper left hand tailboom attachment CRES steel fitting. The MCAI states: ‘‘It has been determined that some helicopters have been fitted with a CRES steel fitting, part number (P/N) 407–030–750–103, and the installation of the tailboom attachment bolt does not meet the design criteria.’’ PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 39577 Comments By publishing the NPRM, we gave the public an opportunity to participate in developing this AD. However, we received no comment on the NPRM or on our determination of the cost to the public. Therefore, based on our review and evaluation of the available data, we have determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting the AD as proposed. Relevant Service Information BHTC has issued Alert Service Bulletin No. 206–06–110 and No. 206L– 06–140, both dated September 7, 2006. The actions described in the MCAI are intended to correct the same unsafe condition as that identified in the service information. Differences Between This AD and the MCAI AD There are no differences between this AD and the MCAI AD. Costs of Compliance We estimate that this AD will affect about 2,206 helicopters (1,471 Model 206A and 206B helicopters and 735 Model 206L helicopters) of U.S. registry. We also estimate that it will take about .5 work-hour per helicopter to determine if a tailboom attachment bolt must be replaced and, if so, 1 additional work hour to replace the tailboom attachment bolt. The average labor rate is $80 per work-hour. Required parts will cost about $133 for Model 206L series helicopters, and $71 for Model 206A and 206B series helicopters. Based on these figures, we estimate the cost of this AD on U.S. operators to be $466,916, or $253 for each Model 206L series helicopter and $191 for each Model 206A and 206B series helicopter. Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. ‘‘Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs,’’ describes in more detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in ‘‘Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, section 44701: General requirements.’’ Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on E:\FR\FM\10JYR1.SGM 10JYR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 133 (Thursday, July 10, 2008)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 39574-39577]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-14734]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2007-0218; Directorate Identifier 92-ANE-56-AD; 
Amendment 39-15602; AD 2008-14-07]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; Lycoming Engines, Fuel Injected 
Reciprocating Engines

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of 
Transportation (DOT).

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive 
(AD) for certain fuel injected reciprocating engines manufactured by 
Lycoming Engines. That AD currently requires inspection, and 
replacement if necessary, of externally mounted fuel injector fuel 
lines. This AD requires the same actions but adds additional engine 
models and clarifies certain compliance time wording. This AD also 
exempts engines that have a Maintenance and Overhaul Manual with an 
Airworthiness Limitations Section that requires inspection and 
replacement, if necessary, of externally mounted fuel injector lines. 
This AD results from Lycoming Engines revising their Mandatory Service 
Bulletin to add new engine models requiring inspection, and from the 
need to clarify a repetitive inspection compliance time. We are issuing 
this AD to prevent failure of the fuel injector fuel lines that would 
allow fuel to spray into the engine compartment, resulting in an engine 
fire.

DATES: This AD becomes effective August 14, 2008. The Director of the 
Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of certain 
publications listed in the regulations as of August 14, 2008.

ADDRESSES: You can get the service information identified in this AD 
from Lycoming Engines, 652 Oliver Street, Williamsport, PA 17701, or go 
to http://www.lycoming.textron.com.
    The Docket Operations office is located at Docket Management 
Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, 
SE., West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, Washington, DC 20590-
0001.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Norm Perenson, Aerospace Engineer, New 
York Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, Engine & Propeller 
Directorate, 1600 Stewart Avenue, Suite 410, Westbury, NY 11590; e-
mail: Norman.perenson@faa.gov; telephone (516) 228-7337; fax (516) 794-
5531.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FAA proposed to amend 14 CFR part 39 by 
superseding AD 2002-26-01, Amendment 39-12986 (67 FR 78965, December 
27, 2002), with a proposed AD. The proposed AD applies to certain fuel 
injected reciprocating engines manufactured by Lycoming Engines. We 
published the proposed AD in the Federal Register on January 2, 2008 
(73 FR 87). That action proposed to:
     Require the same actions as AD 2002-26-01; and
     Add additional engine models, clarify certain compliance 
time wording; and
     Exempt engines that have a Maintenance and Overhaul Manual 
with an Airworthiness Limitations Section that requires inspection and 
replacement, if necessary, of externally mounted fuel injector lines.

Examining the AD Docket

    You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://
www.regulations.gov; or in person at the Docket Operations office 
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal 
holidays. The AD docket contains this AD, the regulatory evaluation, 
any comments received, and other information. The street address for 
the Docket Operations office (telephone (800) 647-5527) is provided in 
the ADDRESSES section. Comments will be available in the AD docket 
shortly after receipt.

Comments

    We provided the public the opportunity to participate in the 
development of this AD. We have considered the comments received.
    One commenter, a private citizen, states that in the proposed AD, 
we wish to exempt engines that have a maintenance manual that deals 
with this subject. He asks how the mechanic is to know if an engine has 
a maintenance manual, if the mechanic does not have access to that 
manual, unless we list the specific engines that are not applicable to 
the proposed AD. He states that we should either make the AD applicable 
to fuel injected Lycoming Engines and then list the applicable and 
nonapplicable engines, or do not change the AD.
    We do not agree. If the engine has an ``I'' in the prefix of the 
engine model and the engine has external fuel lines, the fuel lines 
require inspection. For engines that have a Maintenance Manual, the 
required inspection will be described in the Airworthiness

[[Page 39575]]

Limitations Section (ALS) in the engine's Maintenance Manual. For 
engines that do not have a Maintenance Manual, the required inspection 
will be described in this AD and Lycoming Mandatory Service Bulletin 
No. 342E. The mechanic is required to have the Instructions for 
Continued Airworthiness when performing maintenance (refer to 14 CFR 
43.13). Having the manual or access to the manual, of an airplane or 
engine undergoing maintenance is just as important as having the proper 
tools to perform the maintenance on an aircraft or engine. We added 
language in paragraph (e) to clarify that engine models with an ALS are 
not included in Table 1 and therefore are exempted from compliance with 
this AD.
    One commenter, a private citizen, states that the proposed AD 
should be expanded to include any other certified engines utilizing the 
same fuel injection setup and parts as the Lycoming engines. One 
example is the Jacobs R-755 engine that can be converted to a fuel 
injection system via Supplemental Type Certificate held by Radial 
Engines, LTD. This installation uses a modified IO-720 fuel injection 
system, including the same fuel injection lines that are the subject of 
the AD.
    We do not agree. The unsafe condition for this AD is the lack of 
proper maintenance of the fuel injector lines and support clamps. The 
unsafe condition is not a problem with the design or manufacture of 
fuel injector lines. Some of the clamps are difficult to install on the 
fuel injector lines and then to the engine, resulting in support clamps 
being omitted during field overhaul or repair. The support clamps 
dampen fuel line vibration due to the impact of cooling air and 
vibration from the aircraft/engine. When the lines and clamps are 
accessible and support clamp installation is easier, as in the case of 
the Jacobs R-755 engine, the clamps are properly installed and there 
has not been a reported problem. Since there has not been a reported 
problem with the fuel injector lines on the R-755 engine, or any other 
engine, there is no reason to include any other engine in the AD. We 
did not change the AD.

Conclusion

    We have carefully reviewed the available data, including the 
comments received, and determined that air safety and the public 
interest require adopting the AD as proposed.

Costs of Compliance

    We estimate that 17,740 engines installed on aircraft of U.S. 
registry will be affected by this AD. We also estimate that it will 
take about 1 work-hour to inspect and replace all lines on a four-
cylinder engine, 1.5 work-hours to inspect and replace all lines on a 
six-cylinder engine, and 2 work-hours to inspect and replace all lines 
on an eight-cylinder engine. We also estimate that the average labor 
rate is $80 per work-hour. Required parts will cost about $484 for a 
four-cylinder engine, $726 for a six-cylinder engine, and $968 for an 
eight-cylinder engine. Based on these figures, the total cost per 
airplane of the AD to U.S. operators is estimated as follows:
     $564 for a four-cylinder engine.
     $846 for a six-cylinder engine.
     $1,128 for an eight-cylinder engine.
    We estimate the total cost to U.S. operators to be $11,062,860.

Special Flight Permits Paragraph Removed

    Paragraph (e) of the superseded AD, AD 2002-26-01, contains a 
paragraph pertaining to special flight permits. Even though this final 
rule does not contain a similar paragraph, we have made no changes with 
regard to the use of special flight permits to operate the airplane to 
a repair facility to do the work required by this AD. In July 2002, we 
published a new Part 39 that contains a general authority regarding 
special flight permits and airworthiness directives. See Docket No. 
FAA-2004-8460, Amendment 39-9474 (69 FR 47998, July 22, 2002). Thus, 
when we now supersede ADs we will not include a specific paragraph on 
special flight permits unless we want to limit the use of that general 
authority granted in section 39.23.

Authority for This Rulemaking

    Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to 
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the 
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, 
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
    We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in 
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, section 44701, ``General 
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with 
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing 
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator 
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within 
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition 
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this 
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

    We have determined that this AD will not have federalism 
implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a 
substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between 
the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power 
and responsibilities among the various levels of government.
    For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD:
    (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive 
Order 12866;
    (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and 
Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and
    (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or 
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria 
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.
    We prepared a summary of the costs to comply with this AD and 
placed it in the AD Docket. You may get a copy of this summary at the 
address listed under ADDRESSES.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

    Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by 
reference, Safety.

Adoption of the Amendment

0
Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, 
the Federal Aviation Administration amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13  [Amended]

0
2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by removing Amendment 39-12986 (67 FR 
78965, December 27, 2002), and by adding a new airworthiness directive, 
Amendment 39-15602, to read as follows:

2008-14-07 Lycoming Engines (formerly Textron Lycoming Division, 
AVCO Corporation): Amendment 39-15602. Docket No. FAA-2007-0218; 
Directorate Identifier 92-ANE-56-AD.

Effective Date

    (a) This airworthiness directive (AD) becomes effective August 
14, 2008.

Affected ADs

    (b) This AD supersedes AD 2002-26-01, Amendment 39-12986.

Applicability

    (c) This AD applies to fuel injected reciprocating engines 
manufactured by

[[Page 39576]]

Lycoming Engines that incorporate externally mounted fuel injection 
lines (engines with an ``I'' in the prefix of the engine model 
designation) as listed in the following Table 1:

                    Table 1.--Engine Models Affected
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  Engine                                Model
------------------------------------------------------------------------
AEIO-320..................................  -D1B, -D2B, -E1B, -E2B.
AIO-320...................................  -A1B, -BIB, -C1B.
IO-320....................................  -B1A, -B1C, -C1A, -D1A, -
                                             D1B, -E1A, -E1B, -E2A, -
                                             E2B.
LIO-320...................................  -B1A, -C1A.
AEIO-360..................................  -A1A, -A1B, -A1B6, -A1D, -
                                             A1E, -A1E6, -B1F, -B2F, -
                                             B1G6, -B1H, -B4A, -H1A, -
                                             H1B.
AIO-360...................................  -A1A, -A1B, -B1B.
HIO-360...................................  -A1A, -A1B, -B1A, -C1A, -
                                             C1B, -D1A, -E1AD, -E1BD, -
                                             F1AD, -G1A.
IO-360....................................  -A1A, -A1B, -A1B6, -A1B6D, -
                                             A1C, -A1D, -A1D6, -A2A, -
                                             A2B, -A3B6, -A3B6D, -B1B, -
                                             B1D, -B1E, -B1F, -B1G6, -
                                             B2F, -B2F6, -B4A, -C1A, -
                                             C1B, -C1C, -C1C6, -C1D6, -
                                             C1E6, -C1F, -C1G6, -C2G6, -
                                             F1A, -J1A6D, -M1B, -L2A, -
                                             M1A.
IVO-360...................................  -A1A.
LIO-360...................................  -C1E6.
TIO-360...................................  -A1B, -C1A6D.
IGO-480...................................  -A1B6.
AEIO-540..................................  -D4A5, -D4B5, -D4D5, -L1B5,
                                             L1B5D, -L1D5.
IGO-540...................................  -B1A, -B1C.
IO-540....................................  -A1A5, -AA1A5, -AA1B5, -
                                             AB1A5, -AC1A5, -AE1A5, -
                                             B1A5, -B1C5, -C1B5, -C4B5,
                                             C4D5D, -D4A5, -E1A5, -E1B5,
                                             -G1A5, -G1B5, -G1C5, -G1D5,
                                             -G1E5, -G1F5, -J4A5, -
                                             V4A5D, -K1A5, -K1A5D, -
                                             K1B5, -K1C5, -K1D5, -K1E5,
                                             K1E5D, -K1F5, -K1H5, -K1J5,
                                             -K1F5D, -K1G5, -K1G5D, -
                                             K1H5, -K1J5D, -K1K5, -K1E5,
                                             -K1E5D, -K1F5, -K1J5, -
                                             L1C5, -M1A5, -M1B5D, -M1C5,
                                             -N1A5, -P1A5, -R1A5, -S1A5,
                                             -T4A5D, -T4B5, -T4B5D, -
                                             T4C5D, -V4A5, -V4A5D, -
                                             W1A5, -W1A5D, -W3A5D.
IVO-540...................................  -A1A.
LTIO-540..................................  -F2BD, -J2B, -J2BD, -N2BD, -
                                             R2AD, -U2A, -V2AD, -W2A.
TIO-540...................................  -A1A, -A1B, -A2A, -A2B, -
                                             A2C, -AE1A5, -AE2A, -AH1A,
                                             AA1AD, -AF1A, -AF1B, -AG1A,
                                             -AB1AD, -AB1BD, -AH1A, -
                                             AJ1A, -AK1A, -C1A, -E1A, -
                                             G1A, -F2BD, -J2B, -J2BD, -
                                             N2BD, -R2AD, -S1AD, -U2A, -
                                             V2AD, -W2A.
TIVO-540..................................  -A2A.
IO-720....................................  -A1A, -A1B, -D1B, -D1BD, -
                                             D1C, -D1CD, -B1B, -B1BD, -
                                             C1B.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Engine models in Table 1 are installed on, but not limited to, Piper 
PA-24 Comanche, PA-30 and PA-39 Twin Comanche, PA-28 Arrow, and PA-
23 Aztec; Beech 23 Musketeer; Mooney 20, and Cessna 177 Cardinal 
airplanes.
    (d) This AD is not applicable to engines having internally 
mounted fuel injection lines, which are not accessible.
    (e) This AD is not applicable to engines that have a Maintenance 
and Overhaul Manual with an Airworthiness Limitations Section that 
requires inspection of externally mounted fuel injector lines. Those 
engines models are not included in Table 1 of this AD.

Unsafe Condition

    (f) This AD results from Lycoming Engines revising their 
Mandatory Service Bulletin (MSB) to add new engine models requiring 
inspection, and from the need to clarify a repetitive inspection 
compliance time. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the 
fuel injector fuel lines that would allow fuel to spray into the 
engine compartment, resulting in an engine fire.

Compliance

    (g) You are responsible for having the actions required by this 
AD performed within the compliance times specified unless the 
actions have already been done.

Engines That Have Had Initial Inspections

    (h) For engines that have had initial inspections in accordance 
with Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342, dated March 24, 1972; Textron 
Lycoming MSB No. 342A, dated May 26, 1992; Textron Lycoming MSB No. 
342B, dated October 22, 1993; Supplement No. 1 to MSB No. 342B, 
dated April 27, 1999; Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342C, dated April 28, 
2000; Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342D, dated July 10, 2001; and 
Lycoming Engines MSB No. 342E, dated May 18, 2004, inspect in 
accordance with paragraph (j) of this AD.

Engines That Have Not Had Initial Inspections

    (i) For engines that have not had initial inspections previously 
done in accordance with Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342, dated March 
24, 1972; Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342A, dated May 26, 1992; Textron 
Lycoming MSB No. 342B, dated October 22, 1993; Supplement No. 1 to 
MSB No. 342B, dated April 27, 1999; Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342C, 
dated April 28, 2000; Textron Lycoming MSB No. 342D, dated July 10, 
2001; or Lycoming Engines MSD No. 342E, dated May 18, 2004, inspect 
as follows:
    (1) For engines that have not yet had any fuel line maintenance 
done, or have not had any fuel line maintenance done since new or 
since the last overhaul, inspect in accordance with paragraph (k) of 
this AD within 50 hours time-in-service (TIS) after the effective 
date of this AD.
    (2) For all other engines, inspect in accordance with paragraph 
(k) of this AD within 10 hours TIS after the effective date of this 
AD.

Repetitive Inspections

    (j) Thereafter, inspect at intervals of 100 hours TIS (not to 
exceed 110 hours), at each engine overhaul, and after any 
maintenance has been done on the engine where any clamp (or clamps) 
on a fuel injector line (or lines) has been disconnected, moved, or 
loosened, in accordance with paragraph (k) of this AD.

Inspection Criteria

    (k) Inspect the fuel injector fuel lines and clamps between the 
fuel manifold and the fuel injector nozzles, and replace as 
necessary any fuel injector fuel line and clamp that does not meet 
all conditions specified in Lycoming Engines MSB No. 342E, dated May 
18, 2004.

Alternative Methods of Compliance

    (l) The Manager, New York Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, 
has the authority to approve alternative methods of compliance for 
this AD if requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19.

Related Information

    (m) FAA Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin No. NE-07-49, 
dated September 20, 2007, is not mandatory, but has additional 
information on this subject.
    (n) Contact Norm Perenson, Aerospace Engineer, New York Aircraft 
Certification Office, FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 1600 
Stewart Avenue, Suite 410, Westbury, NY 11590; e-mail: 
Norman.perenson@faa.gov; telephone (516)

[[Page 39577]]

228-7337; fax (516) 794-5531, for more information about this AD.

Material Incorporated by Reference

    (o) You must use Lycoming Engines Mandatory Service Bulletin No. 
342E, dated May 18, 2004, to perform the actions required by this 
AD. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation 
by reference of this service bulletin in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 
552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Contact Lycoming Engines, 652 Oliver 
Street, Williamsport, PA 17701, or go to http://
www.lycoming.textron.com for a copy of this service information. You 
may review copies at the FAA, New England Region, 12 New England 
Executive Park, Burlington, MA; or at the National Archives and 
Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability 
of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://
www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html.

    Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on June 24, 2008.
Peter A. White,
Assistant Manager, Engine and Propeller Directorate, Aircraft 
Certification Service.
 [FR Doc. E8-14734 Filed 7-9-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P