Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University, Department of Anthropology, San Francisco, CA, 30156-30158 [E8-11569]

Download as PDF dwashington3 on PRODPC61 with NOTICES 30156 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 101 / Friday, May 23, 2008 / Notices and collection records, officials of the Oregon State University Department of Anthropology reasonably believe that the human remains are affiliated with the Ho–Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, Otoe– Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. Officials of the Oregon State University Department of Anthropology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Oregon State University Department of Anthropology have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Ho–Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska; Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Otoe–Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. David McMurray, Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, 238 Waldo Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331, telephone (541) 737–4515, before June 23, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Ho–Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Oregon State University Department of Anthropology is responsible for notifying the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River Reservation, South Dakota; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Ho–Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska; Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma; Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota; Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska that this notice has been published. VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:34 May 22, 2008 Jkt 214001 Dated: March 31, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–11592 Filed 5–22–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University, Department of Anthropology, San Francisco, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of San Francisco State University, Department of Anthropology, San Francisco, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Marin County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by San Francisco State University, Department of Anthropology professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California. From 1980 to 1985, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals were removed from CA– MRN–17, De Silva Island, Richardson Bay, Marin County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff under the direction of Gary Pahl. Materials from the excavations were jointly curated by San Francisco State University and Sonoma State University Anthropological Studies Center until 1998, when all excavated materials from CA–MRN–17 were transferred to San Francisco State University. No known individuals were identified. The 17 associated funerary objects are 1 elk bone awl, 3 obsidian flakes, 2 lots of obsidian debitage, 1 chert flake, 1 core, 1 scraper, 2 lots of chert debitage, 2 pieces of ground stone, and 4 carbon samples. PO 00000 Frm 00117 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Site CA–MRN–17 is a shell mound that contains hearths and interments. The five individuals described above were found in three burials. One burial was radiocarbon dated to A.D. 65±115. This date is consistent with archeological and linguistic evidence for the presence of ancestors of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California. A second burial was radiocarbon dated to 3480±145 B.C. This burial represents one of the earliest Native American human remains recorded in the San Francisco Bay area. Archeological and linguistic research does not indicate a clear cultural affiliation for Native American human remains from this early period. However, consultation with tribal representatives indicates that the human remains are culturally affiliated with the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California. Since the archeological and linguistic data are unresolved, and the tribe has stated a desire to repatriate the human remains, it is the opinion of officials of San Francisco State University given the totality of the circumstances, that the human remains from site CA–MRN–17 are reasonably believed to be culturally affiliated with the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California. At an unknown date prior to 1962, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the San Anselmo Shellheap site (CA–MRN–74), Marin County, CA. The information on removal is according to Department of Anthropology records. At an unknown date, the human remains were donated to the San Francisco State University Department of Anthropology by an unknown person. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The age of CA–MRN–74 is unknown. The human remains were removed from a Native American shell midden located within the historically documented territory of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California. The preponderance of available evidence, indicates that the human remains are culturally affiliated with the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California. Between 1969 and 1971, human remains representing a minimum of eight individuals were removed from the Miller Creek Site (CA–MRN–138), Marin County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff under the direction of Charles Slaymaker and Michael Moratto. No known individuals were identified. The six associated funerary objects are one obsidian point, one shell bead, and four ochre fragments. E:\FR\FM\23MYN1.SGM 23MYN1 dwashington3 on PRODPC61 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 101 / Friday, May 23, 2008 / Notices The Miller Creek site is located on the bank of Miller Creek. Radiometric dates on materials removed from the site bracket 700±95 B.C. and A.D. 230±95. Occupation of the site dates from the Middle Archaic to the Upper Emergent Period (circa 1500 B.C.–A.D. 1500). Between 1972 and 1975, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the Pacheco Valle site (CA–MRN–152), Marin County, CA, during excavations conducted by the University of San Francisco, College of Marin, and Miwok Archaeological Preserve of Marin, CA, according to San Francisco State University Department of Anthropology records. At an unknown date after 1972, the human remains were donated to the Department of Anthropology, San Francisco State University by unknown individuals. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The Pacheco Valle site is located on the north bank of the south fork of Ignacio Creek. Radiometric dating and stylistic attributes of the artifact assemblages recovered during the excavations indicate that habitation of the site dates from the Middle Archaic to the Upper Emergent Period (circa 1100 B.C.–A.D. 1500). In 1963, human remains representing a minimum of 12 individuals were removed from CA–MRN–158, Marin County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff under the direction of A.E. Treganza. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are stone flakes. Site CA–MRN–158 is located on the west bank of the Pachaco–Miller Creek. It is a shell mound and habitation site. The artifact assemblage indicates that site habitation dates from the Middle Archaic to the Upper Emergent Period (circa 1500 B.C.–A.D. 1500). In 1968, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were removed from the Pacific Telephone site (CA–MRN–168), Marin County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff under the direction of Charles Slaymaker. No known individuals were identified. The four associated funerary objects are three lots of botanical remains and one cylindrical charmstone. The Pacific Telephone site is a series of shell mounds on the banks of the Arroyo–San Jose Creek. Stylistic attributes of the artifact assemblage indicate that site habitation dates from the Upper Archaic to the Upper Emergent Period (circa 500 B.C.–A.D. 1500). Between 1970 and 1972, human remains representing a minimum of 23 VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:34 May 22, 2008 Jkt 214001 individuals were removed from the Ignacio site (CA–MRN–170), Marin County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff under the direction of Charles Slaymaker and Michael Moratto. No known individuals were identified. The 926 funerary objects are 1chert tool, 1 core, 1 scraper, 5 flakes, 3 bone awl fragments, 1 strigil, 1 needle, 1 spatulate tip, 1 piece of worked bone, 1 bear claw, 1 stone pestle, 1 steatite ear plug, 1 pebble tool, 900 olivella beads, 2 haliotis pendants, 1 obsidian blade, 3 modified flakes, and 1 piece of ochre. The Ignacio site is a shell mound located on the edge of a marsh. Radiometric dating and stylistic attributes of the artifact assemblage indicate that site occupation dates from the Upper Archaic to the Upper Emergent Period (circa 500 B.C.–A.D. 1500). In 1957, and between 1971 and 1977, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were removed from the Olompali site (CA– MRN–193), Marin County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are one piece of flaked stone and one piece of ground stone. The Olompali site is located on San Antonio Creek. It is the largest village dating to the time of Euroamerican contact that is known to be culturally affiliated with the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California. Radiometric dating and stylistic attributes of the artifact assemblage indicate that site occupation dates from A.D. 1500 to Euroamerican contact. In 1967 or earlier, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the surface of the North Inverness site (CA– MRN–207), Marin County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff under the direction of Rob Edwards. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The age of the North Inverness site is unknown. It is located within historically documented territory of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California, and it is most likely that the human remains are culturally affiliated with the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California. Between 1961 and 1968, human remains representing a minimum of 25 individuals were removed from the Preston Point site (CA–MRN–396), Marin County, CA, by W. Beason, Sacramento State University; Ward Upson, Santa Rosa Junior College, Santa Rosa, CA; and Mrs. Agnes Gerkin of Sacramento, CA. The burials excavated by Ward Upson were curated at San PO 00000 Frm 00118 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 30157 Francisco State University, except for two bones which were curated at the Anthropological Studies Center, California State University, Sonoma, CA. The burials excavated by W. Beason and Mrs. Gerkin, along with the funerary objects excavated by Ward Upson, were curated at the Anthropological Studies Center, California State University, Sonoma, CA. Possession and control of all CAMRN–396 materials at the Anthropological Studies Center was transferred to San Francisco State University in 1998. No known individuals were identified. The 658 funerary objects are 8 stone sinkers, 54 clamshell beads, 420 olivella beads, 1 clam shell disc bead, 159 bead fragments, 4 obsidian blades, 1 tinkler, 2 points, 1 bone hairpin in fragments, 1 awl, 1 piece of worked bone, 1 steatite ball, 1 piece of polished steatite, 1 chert core, 1 piece of ochre, 1 charmstone fragment, and 1 piece of worked stone. The Preston Point site is located on Tomales Bay, between Vincent Landing and Preston Point, near the mouth of Walker Creek. Stylistic attributes of the artifact assemblage indicate that site occupation dates from the Upper Emergent Period (circa A.D. 1500 to the time of European contact). At an unknown time prior to 1970, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from an unknown location in Marin County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff under the direction of Charles Slaymaker. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The age of this site is unknown. Marin County is located within the historically documented territory of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California, and it is most likely that the human remains are culturally affiliated with the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California. At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from an unknown location on Tomales Bay, Marin County, CA. The human remains were donated to San Francisco State University by an unknown individual at an unknown date prior to 1996. No known individual was identified. The nine associated funerary objects are olivella shell beads. The age of the site is unknown. Tomales Bay is located within the historically documented territory of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California, and it is most likely that the human remains are culturally affiliated with the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California. E:\FR\FM\23MYN1.SGM 23MYN1 dwashington3 on PRODPC61 with NOTICES 30158 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 101 / Friday, May 23, 2008 / Notices Archeological evidence indicates that the Penutian–speaking proto–Miwok people settled in Marin County, CA, circa 2000 B.C.–A.D. 1500. Ancestral Coastal Miwok have been identified on the basis of similarities between the archeological record and historic material culture as early as 500 B.C. Ethnographic records show that the Coast Miwok occupied all of Marin County at the time of European contact. The preponderance of the ethnographic and archeological evidence, along with consultation with representatives of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California, indicates that all Native American sites in Marin County, CA, are culturally affiliated with descendants of the Coast Miwok. Descendants of the Coast Miwok are members of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California. Officials of San Francisco State University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 85 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the San Francisco State University also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 1,624 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the San Francisco State University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Jeffrey Fentress, Department of Anthropology, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132, telephone (415) 338–2046, before June 23, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. San Francisco State University is responsible for notifying the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California that this notice has been published. Dated: April 23, 2008. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–11569 Filed 5–22–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:34 May 22, 2008 Jkt 214001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), Seattle, WA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Guss Island, San Juan County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by Burke Museum and San Juan Island National Historical Park professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian Tribe, Washington; and Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, Washington. In 1926, human remains were removed from Guss Island in San Juan County, WA, by A.G. Colley, during an excavation, as part of a museum sponsored expedition and were formally accessioned by the museum (Burke Accn. #2126). The whereabouts of two sets of human remains are unknown. The remaining two sets of human remains were legally transferred to Central Washington University in 1974. National Park Service reasserted control over the human remains upon learning they were removed from National Park Service property in 1996 and 2007. In 2007, the Burke Museum and National Park Service agreed that the removal of the human remains from Guss Island predated the establishment of the San Juan Island National Historical Park, which was created in 1966, and should not have been transferred to the National Park Service. The human remains were placed under the control PO 00000 Frm 00119 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 of the Burke Museum. No known individuals were identified. The six funerary objects are three slate knives and three unmodified stones. The prehistory of the region, based on archeological research and analysis, indicates continuous habitation from approximately 2,000 years ago through the mid–19th century by Northern Straits peoples who were part of a Central Coast Salish population that were ancestral to the Lummi Tribe. Anthropological research in the late 1940s by Wayne Suttles indicates that the Lummi occupied San Juan Island and other nearby islands in the contact period, including Guss Island. Archeological information in the original field notes indicates that Native American canoe burials were present on Guss Island in the late 1800s. Based upon the geographic, archeological, and accession documentation, the two individuals from Guss Island are of Native American ancestry. Guss Island is within the aboriginal territory of the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation, Washington. Lummi oral tradition and anthropological data clearly associate the Lummi with San Juan Island and other nearby islands (Suttles 1951, 1990). The evidence indicates that the members of the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation, Washington are culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects from Guss Island. Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Burke Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the six objects described above are reasonably believed to have been place with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Burke Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Dr. Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195–3010, telephone (206) 685–2282, before June 23, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the E:\FR\FM\23MYN1.SGM 23MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 101 (Friday, May 23, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 30156-30158]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-11569]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: San Francisco State University, 
Department of Anthropology, San Francisco, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of San Francisco State University, Department 
of Anthropology, San Francisco, CA. The human remains and associated 
funerary objects were removed from Marin County, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by San 
Francisco State University, Department of Anthropology professional 
staff in consultation with representatives of the Federated Indians of 
Graton Rancheria, California.
    From 1980 to 1985, human remains representing a minimum of five 
individuals were removed from CA-MRN-17, De Silva Island, Richardson 
Bay, Marin County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff under 
the direction of Gary Pahl. Materials from the excavations were jointly 
curated by San Francisco State University and Sonoma State University 
Anthropological Studies Center until 1998, when all excavated materials 
from CA-MRN-17 were transferred to San Francisco State University. No 
known individuals were identified. The 17 associated funerary objects 
are 1 elk bone awl, 3 obsidian flakes, 2 lots of obsidian debitage, 1 
chert flake, 1 core, 1 scraper, 2 lots of chert debitage, 2 pieces of 
ground stone, and 4 carbon samples.
    Site CA-MRN-17 is a shell mound that contains hearths and 
interments. The five individuals described above were found in three 
burials. One burial was radiocarbon dated to A.D. 65115. 
This date is consistent with archeological and linguistic evidence for 
the presence of ancestors of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, 
California. A second burial was radiocarbon dated to 3480145 B.C. This burial represents one of the earliest Native 
American human remains recorded in the San Francisco Bay area. 
Archeological and linguistic research does not indicate a clear 
cultural affiliation for Native American human remains from this early 
period. However, consultation with tribal representatives indicates 
that the human remains are culturally affiliated with the Federated 
Indians of Graton Rancheria, California. Since the archeological and 
linguistic data are unresolved, and the tribe has stated a desire to 
repatriate the human remains, it is the opinion of officials of San 
Francisco State University given the totality of the circumstances, 
that the human remains from site CA-MRN-17 are reasonably believed to 
be culturally affiliated with the Federated Indians of Graton 
Rancheria, California.
    At an unknown date prior to 1962, human remains representing a 
minimum of one individual were removed from the San Anselmo Shellheap 
site (CA-MRN-74), Marin County, CA. The information on removal is 
according to Department of Anthropology records. At an unknown date, 
the human remains were donated to the San Francisco State University 
Department of Anthropology by an unknown person. No known individual 
was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The age of CA-MRN-74 is unknown. The human remains were removed 
from a Native American shell midden located within the historically 
documented territory of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, 
California. The preponderance of available evidence, indicates that the 
human remains are culturally affiliated with the Federated Indians of 
Graton Rancheria, California.
    Between 1969 and 1971, human remains representing a minimum of 
eight individuals were removed from the Miller Creek Site (CA-MRN-138), 
Marin County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff under the 
direction of Charles Slaymaker and Michael Moratto. No known 
individuals were identified. The six associated funerary objects are 
one obsidian point, one shell bead, and four ochre fragments.

[[Page 30157]]

    The Miller Creek site is located on the bank of Miller Creek. 
Radiometric dates on materials removed from the site bracket 70095 B.C. and A.D. 23095. Occupation of the site dates 
from the Middle Archaic to the Upper Emergent Period (circa 1500 B.C.-
A.D. 1500).
    Between 1972 and 1975, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from the Pacheco Valle site (CA-MRN-152), Marin 
County, CA, during excavations conducted by the University of San 
Francisco, College of Marin, and Miwok Archaeological Preserve of 
Marin, CA, according to San Francisco State University Department of 
Anthropology records. At an unknown date after 1972, the human remains 
were donated to the Department of Anthropology, San Francisco State 
University by unknown individuals. No known individual was identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present.
    The Pacheco Valle site is located on the north bank of the south 
fork of Ignacio Creek. Radiometric dating and stylistic attributes of 
the artifact assemblages recovered during the excavations indicate that 
habitation of the site dates from the Middle Archaic to the Upper 
Emergent Period (circa 1100 B.C.-A.D. 1500).
    In 1963, human remains representing a minimum of 12 individuals 
were removed from CA-MRN-158, Marin County, CA, by San Francisco State 
University staff under the direction of A.E. Treganza. No known 
individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are 
stone flakes.
    Site CA-MRN-158 is located on the west bank of the Pachaco-Miller 
Creek. It is a shell mound and habitation site. The artifact assemblage 
indicates that site habitation dates from the Middle Archaic to the 
Upper Emergent Period (circa 1500 B.C.-A.D. 1500).
    In 1968, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
were removed from the Pacific Telephone site (CA-MRN-168), Marin 
County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff under the direction 
of Charles Slaymaker. No known individuals were identified. The four 
associated funerary objects are three lots of botanical remains and one 
cylindrical charmstone.
    The Pacific Telephone site is a series of shell mounds on the banks 
of the Arroyo-San Jose Creek. Stylistic attributes of the artifact 
assemblage indicate that site habitation dates from the Upper Archaic 
to the Upper Emergent Period (circa 500 B.C.-A.D. 1500).
    Between 1970 and 1972, human remains representing a minimum of 23 
individuals were removed from the Ignacio site (CA-MRN-170), Marin 
County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff under the direction 
of Charles Slaymaker and Michael Moratto. No known individuals were 
identified. The 926 funerary objects are 1chert tool, 1 core, 1 
scraper, 5 flakes, 3 bone awl fragments, 1 strigil, 1 needle, 1 
spatulate tip, 1 piece of worked bone, 1 bear claw, 1 stone pestle, 1 
steatite ear plug, 1 pebble tool, 900 olivella beads, 2 haliotis 
pendants, 1 obsidian blade, 3 modified flakes, and 1 piece of ochre.
    The Ignacio site is a shell mound located on the edge of a marsh. 
Radiometric dating and stylistic attributes of the artifact assemblage 
indicate that site occupation dates from the Upper Archaic to the Upper 
Emergent Period (circa 500 B.C.-A.D. 1500).
    In 1957, and between 1971 and 1977, human remains representing a 
minimum of three individuals were removed from the Olompali site (CA-
MRN-193), Marin County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff. No 
known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects 
are one piece of flaked stone and one piece of ground stone.
    The Olompali site is located on San Antonio Creek. It is the 
largest village dating to the time of Euroamerican contact that is 
known to be culturally affiliated with the Federated Indians of Graton 
Rancheria, California. Radiometric dating and stylistic attributes of 
the artifact assemblage indicate that site occupation dates from A.D. 
1500 to Euroamerican contact.
    In 1967 or earlier, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from the surface of the North Inverness site 
(CA-MRN-207), Marin County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff 
under the direction of Rob Edwards. No known individual was identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present.
    The age of the North Inverness site is unknown. It is located 
within historically documented territory of the Federated Indians of 
Graton Rancheria, California, and it is most likely that the human 
remains are culturally affiliated with the Federated Indians of Graton 
Rancheria, California.
    Between 1961 and 1968, human remains representing a minimum of 25 
individuals were removed from the Preston Point site (CA-MRN-396), 
Marin County, CA, by W. Beason, Sacramento State University; Ward 
Upson, Santa Rosa Junior College, Santa Rosa, CA; and Mrs. Agnes Gerkin 
of Sacramento, CA. The burials excavated by Ward Upson were curated at 
San Francisco State University, except for two bones which were curated 
at the Anthropological Studies Center, California State University, 
Sonoma, CA. The burials excavated by W. Beason and Mrs. Gerkin, along 
with the funerary objects excavated by Ward Upson, were curated at the 
Anthropological Studies Center, California State University, Sonoma, 
CA. Possession and control of all CA-MRN-396 materials at the 
Anthropological Studies Center was transferred to San Francisco State 
University in 1998. No known individuals were identified. The 658 
funerary objects are 8 stone sinkers, 54 clamshell beads, 420 olivella 
beads, 1 clam shell disc bead, 159 bead fragments, 4 obsidian blades, 1 
tinkler, 2 points, 1 bone hairpin in fragments, 1 awl, 1 piece of 
worked bone, 1 steatite ball, 1 piece of polished steatite, 1 chert 
core, 1 piece of ochre, 1 charmstone fragment, and 1 piece of worked 
stone.
    The Preston Point site is located on Tomales Bay, between Vincent 
Landing and Preston Point, near the mouth of Walker Creek. Stylistic 
attributes of the artifact assemblage indicate that site occupation 
dates from the Upper Emergent Period (circa A.D. 1500 to the time of 
European contact).
    At an unknown time prior to 1970, human remains representing a 
minimum of two individuals were removed from an unknown location in 
Marin County, CA, by San Francisco State University staff under the 
direction of Charles Slaymaker. No known individuals were identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present.
    The age of this site is unknown. Marin County is located within the 
historically documented territory of the Federated Indians of Graton 
Rancheria, California, and it is most likely that the human remains are 
culturally affiliated with the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, 
California.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from an unknown location on Tomales Bay, Marin 
County, CA. The human remains were donated to San Francisco State 
University by an unknown individual at an unknown date prior to 1996. 
No known individual was identified. The nine associated funerary 
objects are olivella shell beads.
    The age of the site is unknown. Tomales Bay is located within the 
historically documented territory of the Federated Indians of Graton 
Rancheria, California, and it is most likely that the human remains are 
culturally affiliated with the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, 
California.

[[Page 30158]]

    Archeological evidence indicates that the Penutian-speaking proto-
Miwok people settled in Marin County, CA, circa 2000 B.C.-A.D. 1500. 
Ancestral Coastal Miwok have been identified on the basis of 
similarities between the archeological record and historic material 
culture as early as 500 B.C. Ethnographic records show that the Coast 
Miwok occupied all of Marin County at the time of European contact. The 
preponderance of the ethnographic and archeological evidence, along 
with consultation with representatives of the Federated Indians of 
Graton Rancheria, California, indicates that all Native American sites 
in Marin County, CA, are culturally affiliated with descendants of the 
Coast Miwok. Descendants of the Coast Miwok are members of the 
Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California.
    Officials of San Francisco State University have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described above 
represent the physical remains of 85 individuals of Native American 
ancestry. Officials of the San Francisco State University also have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 1,624 objects 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the San Francisco 
State University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), 
there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably 
traced between the Native American human remains and associated 
funerary objects and the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, 
California.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Jeffrey Fentress, Department of Anthropology, 
San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 
94132, telephone (415) 338-2046, before June 23, 2008. Repatriation of 
the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Federated 
Indians of Graton Rancheria, California may proceed after that date if 
no additional claimants come forward.
    San Francisco State University is responsible for notifying the 
Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California that this notice has 
been published.

    Dated: April 23, 2008.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-11569 Filed 5-22-08; 8:45 am]
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