Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR, 30153-30154 [E8-11568]

Download as PDF dwashington3 on PRODPC61 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 101 / Friday, May 23, 2008 / Notices Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Cayuga Nation of New York; Oneida Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin; Onondaga Nation of New York; Seneca Nation of New York; Seneca–Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe, New York (formerly the St. Regis Band of Mohawk Indians of New York); Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York; and Tuscarora Nation of New York. At an unknown date prior to 1891, human remains representing a minimum of seven individuals were removed from unidentified locations in New York State. Three individuals represented by Field Museum of Natural History catalog numbers 41800 and 41803 were removed by F.M. Noe from ‘‘New York’’ and ‘‘northern New York.’’ Mr. Noe was a collector and dealer of natural history specimens and Native American ‘‘relics.’’ His correspondence specifically identifies the human remains as Iroquois. Mr. Noe sold the human remains to Franz Boas. The other four individuals represented by Field Museum of Natural History catalog numbers 41804 and 41805 were removed from ‘‘northern New York’’ probably by Mr. Boas. Mr. Boas then sold all seven sets of human remains to the Field Museum of Natural History in 1894. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object consists of one small fragment of yellow ochre. All of the human remains were removed from sites in New York State. Based on the conditions of the skeletal elements and Mr. Noe’s correspondence, the human remains date to the historic period. The human remains have been identified as Native American based on craniometric analysis, and the specific cultural and geographic attribution in Field Museum of Natural History records. All seven individuals were identified as ‘‘Iroquois’’ in Mr. Noe’s and Mr. Boas’s notes. Descendants of the Iroquois are the Cayuga Nation of New York; Oneida Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin; Onondaga Nation of New York; Seneca Nation of New York; Seneca–Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe, New York; Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York; and Tuscarora Nation of New York. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of seven individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History also have determined VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:34 May 22, 2008 Jkt 214001 that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the one object described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary object and the Cayuga Nation of New York; Oneida Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin; Onondaga Nation of New York; Seneca Nation of New York; Seneca–Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe, New York; Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York; and Tuscarora Nation of New York. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary object should contact Helen Robbins, Director of Repatriation, Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605–2496, telephone (312) 665–7317, before June 23, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary object to the Cayuga Nation of New York; Oneida Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin; Onondaga Nation of New York; Seneca Nation of New York; Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe, New York; Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York; and Tuscarora Nation of New York may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Field Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Cayuga Nation of New York; Oneida Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin; Onondaga Nation of New York; Seneca Nation of New York; Seneca–Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma; Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe, New York; Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York; and Tuscarora Nation of New York that this notice has been published. Dated: April 23, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–11570 Filed 5–22–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S PO 00000 Frm 00114 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 30153 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR. The human remains were removed from mound sites in Fulton County, IL. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Oregon State University Department of Anthropology professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Ho–Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Otoe–Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. Between 1963 and 1964, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from an unknown site in Fulton County, IL, by George Karl Neumann, a physical anthropologist working out of Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN. In 1976, the Oregon State University Department of Anthropology acquired the Neumann Collection from Indiana State University. The human remains are labeled as F85–81, which is believed to indicate they were removed from a mound site in Fulton County, IL. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Between 1963 and 1964, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from unknown sites in Fulton County, IL, by George Karl Neumann, a physical anthropologist working out of Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN. In 1976, the Oregon State University Department of Anthropology acquired the Neumann Collection from Indiana State University. The human remains E:\FR\FM\23MYN1.SGM 23MYN1 dwashington3 on PRODPC61 with NOTICES 30154 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 101 / Friday, May 23, 2008 / Notices are labeled as F85–56 and F85–58, which is believed to indicate they were removed from a mound site in Fulton County, IL. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In January of 1935, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Illinois Mound F14 in Fulton County, IL, by George Karl Neumann, a physical anthropologist working out of Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN. In 1976, the Oregon State University Department of Anthropology acquired the Neumann Collection from Indiana State University. The human remains are labeled as F14–50, which is believed to indicate they were removed from a Spoon River Focus mound site in Fulton County, IL. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The Ho–Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Otoe–Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska have provided both written and oral history of their traditional occupation of Midwest areas east of the Mississippi and have demonstrated land area claims in Illinois. The Ho–Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, Otoe–Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska traditionally occupied areas that have been demonstrated to include sites in Illinois. The tribes at one time constituted a single tribe with shared cultural affiliation. Specific published works cite the Ho–Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, Otoe–Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, as having villages in Illinois that included mound building cultural practices. Based on the preponderance of the evidence, including the primary body of Dr. Neumann’s work in Illinois, and collection records, officials of the Oregon State University Department of Anthropology reasonably believe that the human remains are affiliated with the Ho–Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, Otoe– Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. Officials of the Oregon State University Department of Anthropology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of four individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Oregon State University Department of VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:34 May 22, 2008 Jkt 214001 Anthropology have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Ho–Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, Otoe–Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. David McMurray, Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, 238 Waldo Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331, telephone (541) 737–4515, before June 23, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Ho–Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Oregon State University Department of Anthropology is responsible for notifying the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River Reservation, South Dakota; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Ho–Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska; Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma; Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota; Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska that this notice has been published. Dated: March 31, 2008. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–11568 Filed 5–22–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves PO 00000 Frm 00115 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR. The human remains were removed from a mound site in central Illinois. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Oregon State University Department of Anthropology professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Ho–Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska; Otoe–Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. Between 1930 and 1959, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from an unknown mound site in Illinois, by George Karl Neumann, a physical anthropologist working out of Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN. In 1976, the Oregon State University Department of Anthropology acquired the Neumann Collection from Indiana State University. The human remains are identified in the collection records as a ‘‘Walcolid male.’’ No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Dr. Neumann collected human remains from several archeological projects with a focus on archeological mound sites, skeletal characteristics of Native American races, and general human physical variation and skeletal morphology. The culmination of this research is published as ‘‘Archaeology and Race in the American Indian,’’ in the 1952 Yearbook of Physical Anthropology Vol. 8. The Walcolid morphology type Dr. Neumann describes in this article references 45 ‘‘undeformed’’ specimens he excavated in the Spoon River Focus, central Illinois area that served as the basis for this type. The Neumann Collection contained numerous Native American human remains, the majority of which are from sites associated with Mound Builder cultures. The human remains are determined to be Native American based on skeletal morphology and collection records. The Ho–Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Otoe–Missouria Tribe of Indians, E:\FR\FM\23MYN1.SGM 23MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 101 (Friday, May 23, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 30153-30154]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-11568]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon State University 
Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of Oregon 
State University Department of Anthropology, Corvallis, OR. The human 
remains were removed from mound sites in Fulton County, IL.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Oregon State 
University Department of Anthropology professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin; 
Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the 
Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, 
Oklahoma; and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska.
    Between 1963 and 1964, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from an unknown site in Fulton County, IL, by 
George Karl Neumann, a physical anthropologist working out of Indiana 
State University, Terre Haute, IN. In 1976, the Oregon State University 
Department of Anthropology acquired the Neumann Collection from Indiana 
State University. The human remains are labeled as F85-81, which is 
believed to indicate they were removed from a mound site in Fulton 
County, IL. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    Between 1963 and 1964, human remains representing a minimum of two 
individuals were removed from unknown sites in Fulton County, IL, by 
George Karl Neumann, a physical anthropologist working out of Indiana 
State University, Terre Haute, IN. In 1976, the Oregon State University 
Department of Anthropology acquired the Neumann Collection from Indiana 
State University. The human remains

[[Page 30154]]

are labeled as F85-56 and F85-58, which is believed to indicate they 
were removed from a mound site in Fulton County, IL. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In January of 1935, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from Illinois Mound F14 in Fulton County, IL, 
by George Karl Neumann, a physical anthropologist working out of 
Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN. In 1976, the Oregon State 
University Department of Anthropology acquired the Neumann Collection 
from Indiana State University. The human remains are labeled as F14-50, 
which is believed to indicate they were removed from a Spoon River 
Focus mound site in Fulton County, IL. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and 
Nebraska, Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, and Winnebago 
Tribe of Nebraska have provided both written and oral history of their 
traditional occupation of Midwest areas east of the Mississippi and 
have demonstrated land area claims in Illinois. The Ho-Chunk Nation of 
Wisconsin, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, 
Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, and Winnebago Tribe of 
Nebraska traditionally occupied areas that have been demonstrated to 
include sites in Illinois. The tribes at one time constituted a single 
tribe with shared cultural affiliation. Specific published works cite 
the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, 
Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, and 
Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, as having villages in Illinois that 
included mound building cultural practices. Based on the preponderance 
of the evidence, including the primary body of Dr. Neumann's work in 
Illinois, and collection records, officials of the Oregon State 
University Department of Anthropology reasonably believe that the human 
remains are affiliated with the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Iowa 
Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, Otoe-Missouria 
Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska.
    Officials of the Oregon State University Department of Anthropology 
have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human 
remains described above represent the physical remains of four 
individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Oregon State 
University Department of Anthropology have also determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group 
identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and the Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Iowa Tribe of 
Kansas and Nebraska, Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma, Otoe-Missouria Tribe of 
Indians, Oklahoma, and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. 
David McMurray, Oregon State University Department of Anthropology, 238 
Waldo Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331, telephone (541) 737-4515, before June 
23, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Ho-Chunk Nation of 
Wisconsin, Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, and Winnebago Tribe of 
Nebraska may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come 
forward.
    Oregon State University Department of Anthropology is responsible 
for notifying the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River 
Reservation, South Dakota; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; 
Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, 
Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Ho-Chunk Nation of 
Wisconsin; Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska; Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; 
Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; 
Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma; Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge 
Reservation, South Dakota; Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Prairie 
Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in 
Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox Tribe of the 
Mississippi in Iowa; and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska that this notice 
has been published.

    Dated: March 31, 2008.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-11568 Filed 5-22-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S