Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society, 20925-20926 [E8-8216]

Download as PDF sroberts on PROD1PC64 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 75 / Thursday, April 17, 2008 / Notices The Real Property Asset Listing Portal is now integrated with GovSales.gov and enables any Federal agency to advertise, in one place, its entire inventory of surplus, forfeited and foreclosed real property available for sale. The website provides the public with one location where specific types of real property (i.e., houses, buildings and land, and farms) offered for sale by Federal agencies can be found. In addition, the team engaged other Federal agencies that are authorized to dispose of real property to list their surplus property for sale on the portal. In September 2007, the Department of Justice, the Department of State and the Department of the Treasury also began posting forfeited real property on the portal. 4. Real Property eFAS Initiative—Roles and Responsibilities. There are three main groups of Federal participants associated with eFAS. The responsibilities of each are described below. (a) eFAS Planning Office. This is the main coordinating body of the eFAS initiative. The Planning Office works with the initiative’s governing body, the Executive Steering Committee, and its subgroups, the Personal Property Subcommittee, the Real Property Subcommittee, the Configuration Control Board, the Sales Agency Working Group, and the Communications Working Group. The Planning Office also serves as a central data aggregation point for the entire initiative, and is the primary communication mechanism with the Office of Management and Budget. (b) Portal Sponsors. The four Portal Sponsor agencies and the areas of the portal that they support are: • HUD—Homes, buildings and land; • VA—Homes; • USDA—Farms; and • GSA—Homes, buildings and land. These agencies contribute to the operation of the Portal and provide hosting, listing and support services to facilitate the efficient operation of the portal. (c) Agencies. (1) Posting on GovSales.gov. The four Portal Sponsors listed in subsection 4(b), above, began listing properties on the GovSales.gov website during FY 2007. The remaining President’s Management Scorecard Agencies with real property disposal authority began listing properties for sale on the portal in the 4th Quarter of FY 2007. (2) Reporting Requirements. The Portal Sponsors began reporting sales data and metrics for the 3rd Quarter of FY 2007 sixty (60) days after the end of that quarter (September 1, 2007). The remaining President’s Management Scorecard Agencies began reporting sales data and metrics quarterly for the 4th Quarter of FY 2007 sixty (60) days after the end of that quarter (December 1, 2007). It is important to note that an agency is required to report its real property sales even if the property is sold on its behalf by GSA. When GSA sells property on behalf of another agency, GSA will provide information about that sale to that agency, so that the agency can meet its reporting requirements. 5. Posting and Reporting Instructions (a) Posting. Posting of real property to the eFAS portal is done through the Real VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:08 Apr 16, 2008 Jkt 214001 Property Asset Listing Portal, a web-based portal that is integrated with the eFAS Sales Portal through GovSales.gov. The Listing Portal, while operated by USDA, one of the Portal Sponsors, provides for the posting of all types of real property: houses, buildings and land, and farms. GSA will post property to the portal that it sells on behalf of itself or other agencies. Posting instructions are contained in the Property Admin Web Application User Guide, which can be accessed from GSA’s website at www.gsa.gov/govsales. The required data elements will vary depending on the type of property being advertised. Access to the USDA Listing Portal is provided at https:// propertyadmin.sc.egov.usda.gov. Instructions for establishing user authentication (ID and password) and creating an agency account are provided through the website. (b) Reporting. Reporting will be done Quarterly, by Fiscal Year. The Planning Office will be making a Quarterly data call to each of the President’s Management Scorecard Agencies. Agencies will report the required sales performance information by submitting it to FASPlanningOffice@gsa.gov. The Quarterly reports will be submitted using an Excel-based template provided by the Planning Office during the data call. The reports will provide the following information on a Quarterly basis: • Total number of agency real property assets sold; • Total number of real property assets posted to the eFAS Portal; • Total gross real property sales revenue; • Percentage of real property assets sold equal to or greater than the Government’s estimated fair market value; • Cycle time; and • Total net sales revenue. 6. Additional Information Further information regarding this Bulletin may be obtained by sending an e-mail message to EFASPlanningOffice@gsa.gov. GSA will be publishing the posting and reporting requirements described in this Bulletin in an amendment to the Federal Management Regulation shortly. Dated: April 9, 2008. Kevin Messner, Acting Associate Administrator, Office of Governmentwide Policy. [FR Doc. E8–8312 Filed 4–16–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6820–RH–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society Office of the Secretary, HHS. Request for suggestions on new SACGHS priority issues. AGENCY: ACTION: SUMMARY: The Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society (SACGHS) is updating its study priorities. SACGHS requests suggestions PO 00000 Frm 00021 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 20925 on possible new topics for the Committee to address. DATES: Written or electronic comments should be submitted by May 16, 2008. ADDRESSES: Comments can be sent by mail to the following address: Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society, attn: Suzanne Goodwin, NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities, 6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 750, Bethesda, MD 20892. Comments also can be sent via e-mail to Suzanne Goodwin at goodwins@od.nih.gov or via facsimile to 301–496–9839. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Suzanne Goodwin, NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities, 6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 750, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301–496–9838, goodwins@od.nih.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) established SACGHS to serve as a public forum for deliberations on the broad range of policy issues raised by the development and use of genetic technologies and, as warranted, to provide advice on these issues to the HHS Secretary or other Federal entities as requested. The scope of the Committee’s charge includes assessing how genetic and genomic technologies are being integrated into health care and public health; studying the clinical, public health, ethical, economic, legal, and societal implications of genetic and genomic technologies and applications; identifying opportunities and gaps in research and data collection and analysis efforts; examining the impact of current patent policy and licensing practices on access to genetic and genomic technologies; analyzing uses of genetic information in education, employment, insurance, and law; and serving as a public forum for discussion of issues raised by genetic and genomic technologies. For more information about the Committee, please visit its Web site: http://www4.od.nih.gov/oba/ sacghs.htm. In March 2004, SACGHS identified 11 issues relating to its charge and developed a report that classified the relative priority of these issues (the report is available at http:// www4.od.nih.gov/oba/sacghs/reports/ SACGHSPriorities.pdf). The Committee has produced several work products related to these 11 issues, and other projects are near completion or underway: 1. Coverage and reimbursement of genetic technologies. SACGHS issued a report, Coverage and Reimbursement of Genetic Tests and Services, in February 2006. The report describes the current E:\FR\FM\17APN1.SGM 17APN1 sroberts on PROD1PC64 with NOTICES 20926 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 75 / Thursday, April 17, 2008 / Notices state of coverage and reimbursement of genetic tests and services, highlights concerns that affect patient access to tests and services, and identifies nine steps that HHS and the private sector could take to help improve access to and appropriate utilization of healthrelated genetic tests and services. 2. Large population studies. In March 2007, SACGHS issued a report, Policy Issues Associated with Undertaking a Large U.S. Population Cohort Project on Genes, Environment, and Disease. The report delineates the questions that need to be addressed for policymakers to determine whether the U.S. Government should undertake a large population project to elucidate the influence of genetic variation and environmental factors on common, complex diseases. 3. Genetic discrimination. SACGHS has written three letters to the HHS Secretary championing the enactment of Federal legislation to prohibit discrimination based on genetic information by health insurers and employers. The Committee also provided the Secretary with a legal analysis of the adequacy of current law regarding genetic discrimination, a compendium of public comments documenting public fears and concerns about genetic discrimination, and a 10minute DVD of testimonies received from the public. 4. Genetics education and training of health professionals. SACGHS issued a resolution that urged the HHS Secretary to take a series of steps to ensure the adequacy of genetics education and training of health care and public health professionals. Because of continuing needs in this area, SACGHS created a Genetics Education and Training Task Force in November 2007 to develop a plan to identify the education and training needs of health professionals, lay health educators, and the general public; outline the steps required to meet these needs; and evaluate the effectiveness of existing educational and training efforts. 5. Direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic technologies. SACGHS wrote two letters to the HHS Secretary urging greater collaboration among Federal agencies in addressing the advertising of laboratory-developed genetic tests. These efforts led to the issuance of a Federal Trade Commission Consumer Alert that cautions consumers that athome genetic tests have not been evaluated by FDA and urges them to be wary of the claims made by companies marketing such tests. 6. Oversight of genetic technologies. In March 2007, the Office of the HHS Secretary charged SACGHS with identifying the steps needed for VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:08 Apr 16, 2008 Jkt 214001 evidence development and oversight of genetic and genomic tests. A final report on the issue is expected in May 2008. 7. Pharmacogenomics. In May 2008, SACGHS will issue its final report on the opportunities and challenges associated with pharmacogenomics research, development of pharmacogenomic applications, and integration of these applications into clinical practice and public health. 8. Patents and access. SACGHS is currently studying the positive and negative effects of gene patent and licensing practices on patient access to genetic tests and the public’s health. A final report is expected in 2009. 9. Access to genetic technologies. This was designated as an overarching issue that cuts across all SACGHS work. 10. Public awareness and understanding of genetic technologies. This was designated as an overarching issue that cuts across all SACGHS work. 11. Genetic exceptionalism. This was designated as an overarching issue that cuts across all SACGHS work. SACGHS’s work products can be found at: http://www4.od.nih.gov/oba/ sacghs/reports/reports.html. As described above, SACGHS has completed several major projects related to these 11 issues, and other projects are near completion. In the coming months, the Committee will be identifying new priority issues to address. SACGHS would welcome public perspectives about issues within SACGHS’s charter that are in need of attention and study. Members of the public who wish to suggest an issue are asked to submit a statement (approximately one paragraph in length) that: (1) Describes a problem or policy challenge that needs exploration; and (2) proposes actions the Committee could take to address the issue. The submission of references or other background materials related to the topic is encouraged. The issues suggested should take into consideration the charge of SACGHS, outlined above, and the following points: • The urgency and national importance of the issue. • The extent to which the Federal Government has jurisdiction/authority over the issue. • The need for Federal guidance or regulation on this issue. • Whether the issue raises concerns that only the Federal Government can address. • Whether the issue raises moral or ethical concerns that warrant Federal Government involvement/leadership. PO 00000 Frm 00022 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 • Whether SACGHS’s policy advice on this issue would significantly benefit society. • Whether failure to address the issue would prolong any negative impact the issue may be having on society. • Whether sufficient data about the issue exist for SACGHS to develop informed policy advice. • Whether another body is already addressing the issue or is better equipped to address it. Public comments received by May 16, 2008 will be considered by SACGHS and discussed at its next meeting on July 7–8, 2008 in Washington, DC. Dated: April 7, 2008. Sarah Carr, SACGHS Executive Secretary, National Institutes of Health. [FR Doc. E8–8216 Filed 4–16–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4140–01–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases (BSC, CCID) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92–463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), announces the following meeting for the aforementioned committee: Times and Dates: 9 a.m.–5 p.m., May 6, 2008. 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m., May 7, 2008. Place: CDC Global Conference Center, Building 19, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Atlanta, Georgia 30333. Status: Open to the public, limited only by the space available. Purpose: The Board of Scientific Counselors, CCID, provides advice and guidance to the Director, CDC, and Director, CCID, in the following areas: program goals and objectives; strategies; program organization and resources for infectious disease prevention and control; and program priorities. Matters to be Discussed: Agenda items will include: 1. Breakout Group Discussions: Surveillance (National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases). Respiratory Diseases Strategic Planning (National Center Immunization and Respiratory Diseases). Vaccine Analytic Unit (National Center Immunization and Respiratory Diseases). Program Collaboration and Service Integration (National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention). E:\FR\FM\17APN1.SGM 17APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 75 (Thursday, April 17, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 20925-20926]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-8216]


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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society

AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS.

ACTION: Request for suggestions on new SACGHS priority issues.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and 
Society (SACGHS) is updating its study priorities. SACGHS requests 
suggestions on possible new topics for the Committee to address.

DATES: Written or electronic comments should be submitted by May 16, 
2008.

ADDRESSES: Comments can be sent by mail to the following address: 
Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society, attn: 
Suzanne Goodwin, NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities, 6705 Rockledge 
Drive, Suite 750, Bethesda, MD 20892. Comments also can be sent via e-
mail to Suzanne Goodwin at goodwins@od.nih.gov or via facsimile to 301-
496-9839.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Suzanne Goodwin, NIH Office of 
Biotechnology Activities, 6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 750, Bethesda, MD 
20892, 301-496-9838, goodwins@od.nih.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Department of Health and Human Services 
(HHS) established SACGHS to serve as a public forum for deliberations 
on the broad range of policy issues raised by the development and use 
of genetic technologies and, as warranted, to provide advice on these 
issues to the HHS Secretary or other Federal entities as requested. The 
scope of the Committee's charge includes assessing how genetic and 
genomic technologies are being integrated into health care and public 
health; studying the clinical, public health, ethical, economic, legal, 
and societal implications of genetic and genomic technologies and 
applications; identifying opportunities and gaps in research and data 
collection and analysis efforts; examining the impact of current patent 
policy and licensing practices on access to genetic and genomic 
technologies; analyzing uses of genetic information in education, 
employment, insurance, and law; and serving as a public forum for 
discussion of issues raised by genetic and genomic technologies. For 
more information about the Committee, please visit its Web site: http:/
/www4.od.nih.gov/oba/sacghs.htm.
    In March 2004, SACGHS identified 11 issues relating to its charge 
and developed a report that classified the relative priority of these 
issues (the report is available at http://www4.od.nih.gov/oba/sacghs/
reports/SACGHSPriorities.pdf). The Committee has produced several work 
products related to these 11 issues, and other projects are near 
completion or underway:
    1. Coverage and reimbursement of genetic technologies. SACGHS 
issued a report, Coverage and Reimbursement of Genetic Tests and 
Services, in February 2006. The report describes the current

[[Page 20926]]

state of coverage and reimbursement of genetic tests and services, 
highlights concerns that affect patient access to tests and services, 
and identifies nine steps that HHS and the private sector could take to 
help improve access to and appropriate utilization of health-related 
genetic tests and services.
    2. Large population studies. In March 2007, SACGHS issued a report, 
Policy Issues Associated with Undertaking a Large U.S. Population 
Cohort Project on Genes, Environment, and Disease. The report 
delineates the questions that need to be addressed for policymakers to 
determine whether the U.S. Government should undertake a large 
population project to elucidate the influence of genetic variation and 
environmental factors on common, complex diseases.
    3. Genetic discrimination. SACGHS has written three letters to the 
HHS Secretary championing the enactment of Federal legislation to 
prohibit discrimination based on genetic information by health insurers 
and employers. The Committee also provided the Secretary with a legal 
analysis of the adequacy of current law regarding genetic 
discrimination, a compendium of public comments documenting public 
fears and concerns about genetic discrimination, and a 10-minute DVD of 
testimonies received from the public.
    4. Genetics education and training of health professionals. SACGHS 
issued a resolution that urged the HHS Secretary to take a series of 
steps to ensure the adequacy of genetics education and training of 
health care and public health professionals. Because of continuing 
needs in this area, SACGHS created a Genetics Education and Training 
Task Force in November 2007 to develop a plan to identify the education 
and training needs of health professionals, lay health educators, and 
the general public; outline the steps required to meet these needs; and 
evaluate the effectiveness of existing educational and training 
efforts.
    5. Direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic technologies. SACGHS 
wrote two letters to the HHS Secretary urging greater collaboration 
among Federal agencies in addressing the advertising of laboratory-
developed genetic tests. These efforts led to the issuance of a Federal 
Trade Commission Consumer Alert that cautions consumers that at-home 
genetic tests have not been evaluated by FDA and urges them to be wary 
of the claims made by companies marketing such tests.
    6. Oversight of genetic technologies. In March 2007, the Office of 
the HHS Secretary charged SACGHS with identifying the steps needed for 
evidence development and oversight of genetic and genomic tests. A 
final report on the issue is expected in May 2008.
    7. Pharmacogenomics. In May 2008, SACGHS will issue its final 
report on the opportunities and challenges associated with 
pharmacogenomics research, development of pharmacogenomic applications, 
and integration of these applications into clinical practice and public 
health.
    8. Patents and access. SACGHS is currently studying the positive 
and negative effects of gene patent and licensing practices on patient 
access to genetic tests and the public's health. A final report is 
expected in 2009.
    9. Access to genetic technologies. This was designated as an 
overarching issue that cuts across all SACGHS work.
    10. Public awareness and understanding of genetic technologies. 
This was designated as an overarching issue that cuts across all SACGHS 
work.
    11. Genetic exceptionalism. This was designated as an overarching 
issue that cuts across all SACGHS work.
    SACGHS's work products can be found at: http://www4.od.nih.gov/oba/
sacghs/reports/reports.html.
    As described above, SACGHS has completed several major projects 
related to these 11 issues, and other projects are near completion. In 
the coming months, the Committee will be identifying new priority 
issues to address. SACGHS would welcome public perspectives about 
issues within SACGHS's charter that are in need of attention and study. 
Members of the public who wish to suggest an issue are asked to submit 
a statement (approximately one paragraph in length) that:
    (1) Describes a problem or policy challenge that needs exploration; 
and (2) proposes actions the Committee could take to address the issue. 
The submission of references or other background materials related to 
the topic is encouraged.
    The issues suggested should take into consideration the charge of 
SACGHS, outlined above, and the following points:
     The urgency and national importance of the issue.
     The extent to which the Federal Government has 
jurisdiction/authority over the issue.
     The need for Federal guidance or regulation on this issue.
     Whether the issue raises concerns that only the Federal 
Government can address.
     Whether the issue raises moral or ethical concerns that 
warrant Federal Government involvement/leadership.
     Whether SACGHS's policy advice on this issue would 
significantly benefit society.
     Whether failure to address the issue would prolong any 
negative impact the issue may be having on society.
     Whether sufficient data about the issue exist for SACGHS 
to develop informed policy advice.
     Whether another body is already addressing the issue or is 
better equipped to address it.
    Public comments received by May 16, 2008 will be considered by 
SACGHS and discussed at its next meeting on July 7-8, 2008 in 
Washington, DC.

    Dated: April 7, 2008.
Sarah Carr,
SACGHS Executive Secretary, National Institutes of Health.
 [FR Doc. E8-8216 Filed 4-16-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4140-01-P