30-Day Notice of Submission to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB); Opportunity for Public Comment, 20934-20936 [E8-8137]

Download as PDF 20934 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 75 / Thursday, April 17, 2008 / Notices for rentals and royalties at rates of $5.00 per acre or fraction thereof, per year and 162⁄3 percent, respectively. The lessee has paid the required $500 administrative fee and $163 to reimburse the Department for the cost of this Federal Register notice. The lessees have met all the requirements for reinstatement of the lease as set out in Section 31(d) and (e) of the Mineral Lands Leasing Act of 1920 (30 U.S.C. 188), and the Bureau of Land Management is proposing to reinstate lease COC59920 effective February 1, 2008, under the original terms and conditions of the lease and the increased rental and royalty rates cited above. completion of an analysis to determine if any of the land needs special designation. Dated: April 10, 2008. Milada Krasilinec, Land Law Examiner. [FR Doc. E8–8238 Filed 4–16–08; 8:45 am] Wasatch-Cache National Forest, Mt. Olympus Powder Magazine Administrative Site, Salt Lake Meridian T.2 S., R. 1 E. Sec. 11, lots 1 and 2 (formerly described as SE 1⁄4 NE 1⁄4) and NE 1⁄4 SE 1⁄4. The area described contains approximately 80 acres in Salt Lake County. BILLING CODE 4310–JB–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [UTU 016431] Public Land Order No. 7704; Partial Revocation of Public Land Order No. 1483; Utah AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. Public Land Order. sroberts on PROD1PC64 with NOTICES ACTION: SUMMARY: This order partially revokes a Public Land Order insofar as it affects 80 acres of public land within a national forest, which was withdrawn and reserved for use of the Forest Service as the Mt. Olympus Powder Magazine Administrative Site. This order also opens 5.75 acres of that land to disposal in accordance with the Forest Service Facility Realignment and Enhancement Act of 2005. DATES: Effective Date: April 17, 2008. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Rhonda Flynn, BLM Utah State Office, 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101–1345, 801–539– 4132. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Forest Service has determined that a portion of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 1483 is no longer needed and has requested a partial revocation. Approximately 20 acres of the land described in Paragraph 1 is located within the Mt. Olympus Wilderness Area, and this is a record-clearing action for that portion. Except for the land described in Paragraph 2 being opened to sale, no land will be opened to surface entry or mining until VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:19 Apr 16, 2008 Jkt 214001 Order By virtue of the authority vested in the Secretary of the Interior by section 204 of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, 43 U.S.C. 1714 (2000), it is ordered as follows: 1. Public Land Order No. 1483 (22 FR 7307), which withdrew public land within national forests and reserved it for use of the Forest Service for administrative sites, recreation areas, and a roadside zone, is hereby revoked only insofar as it affects the following described land: 2. Subject to valid existing rights, the following described land is hereby opened to sale in accordance with the Forest Service Facility Realignment and Enhancement Act of 2005 (Pub. L. 109– 54): Salt Lake Meridian T.2 S., R. 1 E. Sec. 11, lot 2. The area described contains approximately 5.75 acres in Salt Lake County. Dated: April 7, 2008. C. Stephen Allred, Assistant Secretary—Land and Minerals Management. [FR Doc. E8–8321 Filed 4–16–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–11–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service 30-Day Notice of Submission to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB); Opportunity for Public Comment Department of the Interior, National Park Service. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. AGENCY: SUMMARY: Under provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 and 5 CFR part 1320, Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements, the National Park Service (NPS) invites public comments on a proposed new collection of information (OMB #1024– XXXX). PO 00000 Frm 00030 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Public comments on this Information Collection Request (ICR) will be accepted on or before May 19, 2008. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments directly to the Desk Officer for the Department of the Interior (OMB #1024– XXXX), Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB, by fax at 202– 395–6566, or by electronic mail at oira_docket@omb.eop.gov. Please also send a copy of your comments to Dr. Jane Swanson, Protected Areas Social Research Unit, College of Forest Resources, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195; or via phone at 206– 685–9150; or via fax at 206–685–0790; or via e-mail at swansonj@u.washington.edu. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. James Gramann, NPS Social Science Program, 1201 ‘‘Eye’’ St., Washington, DC 20005; or via phone 202–513–7189; or via e-mail James_Gramann@partner.nps.gov. You are entitled to a copy of the entire ICR package free-of-charge. You may access this ICR at http://www.reginfo.gov/ public/. Comments Received on the 60-Day Federal Register Notice: The NPS published a 60-Day Notice to solicit public comments on this ICR entitled ‘‘Research Assessing Current and Potential Impacts of Cruise Ships on Visitor Experiences in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve’’ in the Federal Register on November 5, 2007 (72 FR 62489–62490). The comment period closed on January 4, 2007. After multiple notifications to stakeholders requesting comments, the NPS received four comments as a result of the publication of this 60-Day Federal Register Notice. We received four public comments on the proposed visitor study in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (GLBA). All of these comments were based only on the information included in the 60day notice. Two comments were from charter operators who have agreements with GLBA. The first of these indicated that interviewing of charter operators and other gatekeepers is critical in order to get a complete picture as many of their clients are unaware of actions the operators take to avoid cruise ships at critical points in the itinerary. She further stated she was not opposed to cruise ships, appreciated the balance the park was working to achieve, and appreciated the opportunity to have the operators’ voice heard. The comment was addressed in a reply e-mail acknowledging her understanding of the gatekeeper interview component of the proposed research, attaching the DATES: E:\FR\FM\17APN1.SGM 17APN1 sroberts on PROD1PC64 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 75 / Thursday, April 17, 2008 / Notices proposed interview guide, and offering to send the complete work plan and questionnaires if she desired. The second comment, received from another charter operator, indicated feeling overwhelmed by cruise ships not in GLBA, but everywhere else in Southeast Alaska. He believes the park does a good job managing vessels within park waters. His concern is with other areas of development in Hobart Bay and Tracy Arm and he sent a description of the development planned for Hobart Bay. The comment was addressed in a reply email thanking him for sharing his experience and concerns with cruise ships in Southeast Alaska, as it helps project staff understand the broader context of the proposed project. An offer to send the complete work plan and questionnaires was accepted, the information was sent, and no further comment has been received. The other two comments were on behalf of cruise ship companies. The first of these comments was sent from John Shively, Vice President— Government and Community Relations, Holland America Line. The comment indicated a need for more information regarding the survey methods and a desire to review them and the survey instruments. Additionally the comment noted that the company was unaware that cruise ship size was an issue the National Park Service desired to study. The comment was addressed in a reply e-mail thanking him for his comments and interest in the project and included the complete work plan and survey instruments for review. A return e-mail indicated that he would review the documents upon his return from a 10day trip. The second cruise ship company comment was from Charlie Bell, President, Princess Cruises, and primarily indicated concerns about survey methods because of the limited scope of the summary included in the 60-day notice. The comment was addressed by an email reply that thanked him for his comments and interest in the research and included the complete work plan and survey instruments. No further comment has been received. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Research Assessing Current and Potential Impacts of Cruise Ships on Visitor Experiences in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. Bureau Form Number(s): None. OMB Number: To be requested. Expiration Date: To be requested. Type of Request: New collection. Description of Need: The proposed study would provide information to be VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:08 Apr 16, 2008 Jkt 214001 used in deciding cruise ship use levels in Glacier Bay National Park. The purpose of this research is to provide Park managers with information about current impacts of cruise ships, if any, on the quality of visitor experience and to estimate potential impacts on the quality of visitor experience for cruise ship use levels specified in the Record of Decision (Record of Decision for Vessel Quotas and Operating Requirements in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, 2003). The Final Environmental Impact Statement for Vessel Quotas and Operating Requirements, and the resulting Record of Decision signed November 21, 2003, currently guide vessel management in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (GLBA). The Record of Decision adopted an alternative that maintains the current daily maximum of two cruise ships in the park and sets seasonal use days for the June-August season at 139 ships. The Record of Decision also provides for possible increases in cruise ship use. Specifically, use in the June-August season could be increased to two ships per day, every day, for a seasonal use total of 184 ships. The Record of Decision provided the following direction for the role of research in the process of changing quotas for cruise ships: The determination of whether to increase seasonal-use day quotas for cruise ships will rely on criteria that define the environmental and social conditions to be met before any additional seasonal-use days are approved. These criteria will be based on the results of and guidance provided through studies that examine the effects of vessels on all park resources and visitor experience. (p. 18.) The Record of Decision also specified that the studies examining the effects of cruise ships would be identified with the assistance of a Glacier Bay Vessel Management Science Advisory Board (SAB). The SAB was established and a final report of its findings and recommendations was published in September 2005. The SAB recommended a comprehensive research program that was presented in general terms with no prioritization or cost estimates. Because the research program outlined in the SAB could not be performed within the time and budget limitations facing park managers, the SAB recommended (and park managers agreed to fund) a social research problem analysis. Upon review of the final Problem Analysis, park staff decided on a research program that would focus primarily on measuring impacts of cruise ships, if any, on the quality of visitor experience and secondarily on understanding the PO 00000 Frm 00031 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 20935 context in which cruise ship impacts occur and how these impacts arise. To accomplish these objectives, this proposed research includes the following components: (1) Assessment of cruise ship impacts, if any, on the quality of visitor experience, and (2) The role of experience gatekeepers in visitor encounters with cruise ships. 1. Assessing Impacts of Cruise Ships, if Any, on the Quality of Visitor Experiences in Glacier Bay Proper The purpose of the proposed study is to provide park managers with information about a variety of potential impacts of cruise ships on all visitor groups that have potential to encounter a cruise ship in Glacier Bay proper. Information about impacts of other mechanized transport, if any, on the quality of visitor experience will also be collected (1) to provide a context for understanding the role of cruise ships on the quality of visitor experience and (2) to examine aggregate effects of mechanized transport on the quality of visitor experience. This research, proposed for the 2008 summer season, will use on-site and mail questionnaires to gather data for estimating impact rates for different user groups. Additionally, in-depth interviews with visitors will provide additional information about how these impacts arise and visitors’ opinions of the appropriateness of cruise ships in Glacier Bay proper. 2. The Role of Experience Gatekeepers in Visitor Encounters With Cruise Ships Discussions with experience providers indicate that these individuals may adjust itineraries in an effort to provide visitors with a particular experience. Often that experience is one where few other vessels are encountered. Understanding these practices and how the increase in 2cruise-ship days may affect them are the primary objectives of this research component. This information will be integral when estimating population impacts under the 2-cruise-ships every day scenario. Gatekeepers identified include charter and tour boat captains, kayak guides, and VIS staff who issue permits and provide guidance to kayakers and captains of private vessels. Interviews, to be conducted during the summer 2008 use season, will rely on an open-ended, in-depth process. The obligation to respond is voluntary. Automated data collections: This information will be collected via inperson interviews and surveys and mailback surveys. No automated data collection will take place. E:\FR\FM\17APN1.SGM 17APN1 sroberts on PROD1PC64 with NOTICES 20936 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 75 / Thursday, April 17, 2008 / Notices Description of respondents: Component 1—survey and interviews: Cruise ship passengers, tour boat passengers, charter boat passengers, people entering on private vessel permits, and people entering on backcountry permits who visit Glacier Bay proper between June 1, 2008, and August 31, 2008. Component 1— itinerary data: Charter and tour boat captains and kayak guides who serve visitors included in the survey component of the project. Component 2: Charter and tour boat captains, kayak guides, and VIS staff who serve visitors to Glacier Bay proper during the 2008 summer season. Estimated average number of respondents: Component 1: 2800 respondents for on-site survey; 1960 respondents for mail survey; 100 respondents for interviews; 24 respondents for itinerary data. Component 2: 27 interview respondents. Non-respondents: 1305 (component 1: 460 on-site, 842 mail-back; component 2: 3 on-site) Estimated average number of responses: Component 1: 2800 responses for on-site survey, 1960 responses for mail survey; 100 responses for interview. Component 2: 27 interview responses. Non-responses: 1305 (component 1: 460 on-site, 842 mail-back; component 2: 3 on-site). Estimated average burden hours per response: Component 1: 3 minutes for on-site survey respondents; 25 minutes for mail questionnaire; 30 minutes for interview respondents. Component 2: 15 minutes. Non-respondent: 1 minute for on-site; 3 minutes for mail-back. Frequency of Response: 1 time per respondent. Estimated total annual reporting burden: 1,064 hours. Comments are invited on: (1) The practical utility of the information being gathered; (2) the accuracy of the burden hour estimate; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information being gathered; and (4) ways to minimize the burden to respondents, including use of automated information collection techniques or other forms of information. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask OMB in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:08 Apr 16, 2008 Jkt 214001 Dated: April 9, 2008. Leonard E. Stowe, NPS, Information Collection Clearance Officer. [FR Doc. E8–8137 Filed 4–16–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–M DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY, that meet the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary objects’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Prior to 1900, W.T. Smith acquired 104 cultural items through excavations at what is now called the Clements Site, on his land in Cass County, TX. In 1900, Mr. Smith sold the cultural items to the museum. The 104 cultural items are 3 celts, 25 glass beads, 1 piece of green pigment, 3 knives, 3 pipes, 29 shell beads and pendants, 5 unmodified shells, 1 shell implement, and 34 ceramic vessels. The three celts are ground from a type of shale commonly known as ‘‘green stone.’’ The 25 glass beads are blue, opaque, and round. The one piece of green pigment has a clay-like consistency. The three knives are made of chipped chert. Of the three ceramic pipes, two are complete and elbowshaped, and one is a broken bowl. The 29 shell beads and pendants include 15 marine shells carved into zoomorphic shapes, 6 marine shell ear discs, 6 barrel-shaped marine shell beads, and 2 worn and cut freshwater mussel shells. The five unmodified shells are unmodified freshwater mussel shell valves. The one shell implement is a complete freshwater mussel valve, modified for use as a hoe. The 34 ceramic vessels include 15 water vessels, 2 vases, 3 pots, and 14 bowls. PO 00000 Frm 00032 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 The determination that the cultural items are unassociated funerary objects is based on museum documentation, consultation information provided by representatives of the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma, and expert opinion. Museum documentation specifically indicates that these cultural items were associated with burials. The museum is not in possession of the human remains from these burials. Based on ceramic style and archeological evidence, these cultural items date to between CE 1680 and 1720. Historical and archeological evidence indicates that the Cass County region was occupied by the Caddo during the historic period, and that this group emerged from pre-contact Caddoan culture dating back to approximately CE 850. Expert analysis and consultation have confirmed that the ceramics are consistent with the established Caddoan ceramic sequence. At an unknown date, C.C. Jones collected seven cultural items from an unknown locality in the vicinity of Shreveport, LA. The museum acquired the cultural items from Mr. Jones, through purchase or as a gift, and accessioned them at an unknown date between 1869 and 1890. The seven cultural items are two ceramic vessels and five ceramic fragments. The two ceramic vessels are one pot and one water vessel. The five ceramic fragments are from a single vessel. The determination that the cultural items are unassociated funerary objects is based on museum documentation, consultation information provided by the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma, expert opinion, and an article published by Mr. Jones in which he states that these objects were removed from an ‘‘ancient burial ground.’’ The museum is not in possession of any human remains from these burials. Based on ceramic style, the two vessels date to between CE 1600 and 1750, while the fragments cannot be dated. Historical and archeological evidence indicates that the Shreveport region was occupied by the Caddo during the historic period, and that this group emerged from pre-contact Caddoan culture dating back to approximately CE 850. Expert analysis and consultation have confirmed that the ceramics are consistent with the established Caddoan ceramic sequence. At an unknown date, DeCost Smith collected one cultural item from an unknown locality in the Ouachita River valley of either Arkansas or Louisiana. The museum acquired the cultural item in 1940, along with more than 200 others, through Mr. Smith’s bequest. The one cultural item is a ceramic bottle. E:\FR\FM\17APN1.SGM 17APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 75 (Thursday, April 17, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 20934-20936]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-8137]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


30-Day Notice of Submission to the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB); Opportunity for Public Comment

AGENCY: Department of the Interior, National Park Service.

ACTION: Notice and request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Under provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 and 5 
CFR part 1320, Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements, the National 
Park Service (NPS) invites public comments on a proposed new collection 
of information (OMB 1024-XXXX).

DATES: Public comments on this Information Collection Request (ICR) 
will be accepted on or before May 19, 2008.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments directly to the Desk Officer for the 
Department of the Interior (OMB 1024-XXXX), Office of 
Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB, by fax at 202-395-6566, or by 
electronic mail at oira_docket@omb.eop.gov. Please also send a copy of 
your comments to Dr. Jane Swanson, Protected Areas Social Research 
Unit, College of Forest Resources, University of Washington, Seattle, 
WA 98195; or via phone at 206-685-9150; or via fax at 206-685-0790; or 
via e-mail at swansonj@u.washington.edu.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. James Gramann, NPS Social Science 
Program, 1201 ``Eye'' St., Washington, DC 20005; or via phone 202-513-
7189; or via e-mail James_Gramann@partner.nps.gov. You are entitled to 
a copy of the entire ICR package free-of-charge. You may access this 
ICR at http://www.reginfo.gov/public/.
    Comments Received on the 60-Day Federal Register Notice: The NPS 
published a 60-Day Notice to solicit public comments on this ICR 
entitled ``Research Assessing Current and Potential Impacts of Cruise 
Ships on Visitor Experiences in Glacier Bay National Park and 
Preserve'' in the Federal Register on November 5, 2007 (72 FR 62489-
62490). The comment period closed on January 4, 2007. After multiple 
notifications to stakeholders requesting comments, the NPS received 
four comments as a result of the publication of this 60-Day Federal 
Register Notice.
    We received four public comments on the proposed visitor study in 
Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (GLBA). All of these comments 
were based only on the information included in the 60-day notice. Two 
comments were from charter operators who have agreements with GLBA. The 
first of these indicated that interviewing of charter operators and 
other gatekeepers is critical in order to get a complete picture as 
many of their clients are unaware of actions the operators take to 
avoid cruise ships at critical points in the itinerary. She further 
stated she was not opposed to cruise ships, appreciated the balance the 
park was working to achieve, and appreciated the opportunity to have 
the operators' voice heard. The comment was addressed in a reply e-mail 
acknowledging her understanding of the gatekeeper interview component 
of the proposed research, attaching the

[[Page 20935]]

proposed interview guide, and offering to send the complete work plan 
and questionnaires if she desired.
    The second comment, received from another charter operator, 
indicated feeling overwhelmed by cruise ships not in GLBA, but 
everywhere else in Southeast Alaska. He believes the park does a good 
job managing vessels within park waters. His concern is with other 
areas of development in Hobart Bay and Tracy Arm and he sent a 
description of the development planned for Hobart Bay. The comment was 
addressed in a reply email thanking him for sharing his experience and 
concerns with cruise ships in Southeast Alaska, as it helps project 
staff understand the broader context of the proposed project. An offer 
to send the complete work plan and questionnaires was accepted, the 
information was sent, and no further comment has been received.
    The other two comments were on behalf of cruise ship companies. The 
first of these comments was sent from John Shively, Vice President--
Government and Community Relations, Holland America Line. The comment 
indicated a need for more information regarding the survey methods and 
a desire to review them and the survey instruments. Additionally the 
comment noted that the company was unaware that cruise ship size was an 
issue the National Park Service desired to study. The comment was 
addressed in a reply e-mail thanking him for his comments and interest 
in the project and included the complete work plan and survey 
instruments for review. A return e-mail indicated that he would review 
the documents upon his return from a 10-day trip.
    The second cruise ship company comment was from Charlie Bell, 
President, Princess Cruises, and primarily indicated concerns about 
survey methods because of the limited scope of the summary included in 
the 60-day notice. The comment was addressed by an email reply that 
thanked him for his comments and interest in the research and included 
the complete work plan and survey instruments. No further comment has 
been received.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 
    Title: Research Assessing Current and Potential Impacts of Cruise 
Ships on Visitor Experiences in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve.
    Bureau Form Number(s): None.
    OMB Number: To be requested.
    Expiration Date: To be requested.
    Type of Request: New collection.
    Description of Need: The proposed study would provide information 
to be used in deciding cruise ship use levels in Glacier Bay National 
Park. The purpose of this research is to provide Park managers with 
information about current impacts of cruise ships, if any, on the 
quality of visitor experience and to estimate potential impacts on the 
quality of visitor experience for cruise ship use levels specified in 
the Record of Decision (Record of Decision for Vessel Quotas and 
Operating Requirements in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, 
2003).
    The Final Environmental Impact Statement for Vessel Quotas and 
Operating Requirements, and the resulting Record of Decision signed 
November 21, 2003, currently guide vessel management in Glacier Bay 
National Park and Preserve (GLBA). The Record of Decision adopted an 
alternative that maintains the current daily maximum of two cruise 
ships in the park and sets seasonal use days for the June-August season 
at 139 ships. The Record of Decision also provides for possible 
increases in cruise ship use. Specifically, use in the June-August 
season could be increased to two ships per day, every day, for a 
seasonal use total of 184 ships. The Record of Decision provided the 
following direction for the role of research in the process of changing 
quotas for cruise ships:

    The determination of whether to increase seasonal-use day quotas 
for cruise ships will rely on criteria that define the environmental 
and social conditions to be met before any additional seasonal-use 
days are approved. These criteria will be based on the results of 
and guidance provided through studies that examine the effects of 
vessels on all park resources and visitor experience. (p. 18.)

    The Record of Decision also specified that the studies examining 
the effects of cruise ships would be identified with the assistance of 
a Glacier Bay Vessel Management Science Advisory Board (SAB). The SAB 
was established and a final report of its findings and recommendations 
was published in September 2005. The SAB recommended a comprehensive 
research program that was presented in general terms with no 
prioritization or cost estimates. Because the research program outlined 
in the SAB could not be performed within the time and budget 
limitations facing park managers, the SAB recommended (and park 
managers agreed to fund) a social research problem analysis. Upon 
review of the final Problem Analysis, park staff decided on a research 
program that would focus primarily on measuring impacts of cruise 
ships, if any, on the quality of visitor experience and secondarily on 
understanding the context in which cruise ship impacts occur and how 
these impacts arise. To accomplish these objectives, this proposed 
research includes the following components: (1) Assessment of cruise 
ship impacts, if any, on the quality of visitor experience, and (2) The 
role of experience gatekeepers in visitor encounters with cruise ships.

1. Assessing Impacts of Cruise Ships, if Any, on the Quality of Visitor 
Experiences in Glacier Bay Proper

    The purpose of the proposed study is to provide park managers with 
information about a variety of potential impacts of cruise ships on all 
visitor groups that have potential to encounter a cruise ship in 
Glacier Bay proper. Information about impacts of other mechanized 
transport, if any, on the quality of visitor experience will also be 
collected (1) to provide a context for understanding the role of cruise 
ships on the quality of visitor experience and (2) to examine aggregate 
effects of mechanized transport on the quality of visitor experience. 
This research, proposed for the 2008 summer season, will use on-site 
and mail questionnaires to gather data for estimating impact rates for 
different user groups. Additionally, in-depth interviews with visitors 
will provide additional information about how these impacts arise and 
visitors' opinions of the appropriateness of cruise ships in Glacier 
Bay proper.

2. The Role of Experience Gatekeepers in Visitor Encounters With Cruise 
Ships

    Discussions with experience providers indicate that these 
individuals may adjust itineraries in an effort to provide visitors 
with a particular experience. Often that experience is one where few 
other vessels are encountered. Understanding these practices and how 
the increase in 2-cruise-ship days may affect them are the primary 
objectives of this research component. This information will be 
integral when estimating population impacts under the 2-cruise-ships 
every day scenario. Gatekeepers identified include charter and tour 
boat captains, kayak guides, and VIS staff who issue permits and 
provide guidance to kayakers and captains of private vessels. 
Interviews, to be conducted during the summer 2008 use season, will 
rely on an open-ended, in-depth process. The obligation to respond is 
voluntary.
    Automated data collections: This information will be collected via 
in-person interviews and surveys and mail-back surveys. No automated 
data collection will take place.

[[Page 20936]]

    Description of respondents: Component 1--survey and interviews: 
Cruise ship passengers, tour boat passengers, charter boat passengers, 
people entering on private vessel permits, and people entering on 
backcountry permits who visit Glacier Bay proper between June 1, 2008, 
and August 31, 2008. Component 1--itinerary data: Charter and tour boat 
captains and kayak guides who serve visitors included in the survey 
component of the project. Component 2: Charter and tour boat captains, 
kayak guides, and VIS staff who serve visitors to Glacier Bay proper 
during the 2008 summer season.
    Estimated average number of respondents: Component 1: 2800 
respondents for on-site survey; 1960 respondents for mail survey; 100 
respondents for interviews; 24 respondents for itinerary data. 
Component 2: 27 interview respondents. Non-respondents: 1305 (component 
1: 460 on-site, 842 mail-back; component 2: 3 on-site)
    Estimated average number of responses: Component 1: 2800 responses 
for on-site survey, 1960 responses for mail survey; 100 responses for 
interview. Component 2: 27 interview responses. Non-responses: 1305 
(component 1: 460 on-site, 842 mail-back; component 2: 3 on-site).
    Estimated average burden hours per response: Component 1: 3 minutes 
for on-site survey respondents; 25 minutes for mail questionnaire; 30 
minutes for interview respondents. Component 2: 15 minutes. Non-
respondent: 1 minute for on-site; 3 minutes for mail-back.
    Frequency of Response: 1 time per respondent.
    Estimated total annual reporting burden: 1,064 hours.
    Comments are invited on: (1) The practical utility of the 
information being gathered; (2) the accuracy of the burden hour 
estimate; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the 
information being gathered; and (4) ways to minimize the burden to 
respondents, including use of automated information collection 
techniques or other forms of information. Before including your 
address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying 
information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire 
comment--including your personal identifying information--may be made 
publicly available at any time. While you can ask OMB in your comment 
to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, 
we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.

    Dated: April 9, 2008.
Leonard E. Stowe,
NPS, Information Collection Clearance Officer.
 [FR Doc. E8-8137 Filed 4-16-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-M