Elk and Vegetation Management Plan, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO, 20710-20711 [E8-8116]

Download as PDF 20710 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 74 / Wednesday, April 16, 2008 / Notices (8) Such other provisions as may be required by law, including compliance with the terms or provisions of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (78 Stat. 241). Upon publication of this notice in the Federal Register, the lands will be segregated from all other forms of appropriation under the public land laws, including the general mining laws, except for lease/conveyance under the Recreation and Public Purposes Act. The segregative effect shall terminate upon issuance of a patent, upon final rejection of the application, or 18 months from the date of this notice, whichever occurs first. Classification Comments: Interested parties may submit comments involving the suitability of the land for museum purposes. Comments on the classification are restricted to whether the land is physically suited for the proposed use, whether the use will maximize the future use or uses of the land, whether the use is consistent with local planning and zoning, or if the use is consistent with State and Federal programs. Application Comments: Interested parties may submit comments regarding the specific use proposed in the application and plan of development and management, whether the BLM followed proper administrative procedures in reaching the decision, or any other factor not directly related to the suitability of the land for the proposed use. For a period until June 2, 2008, interested parties and the general public may submit in writing any comments concerning the land being considered for lease/conveyance, including notification of any encumbrances or other claims relating to the identified land, to the Field Manager, BLM Rawlins Field Office, at the above address. In order to ensure consideration in the environmental analysis of the proposed lease/sale, comments must be in writing and postmarked or delivered within 45 days of the initial date of publication of this Notice. Comments transmitted via e-mail will not be accepted. Any objections will be evaluated by the State Director, who may sustain, vacate, or modify this realty action. In the absence of any adverse comments, regarding this realty action, it will become the final determination of the Department of the Interior. In the absence of any adverse comments, regarding the classification action, it will become effective June 16, 2008. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. jlentini on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES (Authority: 43 CFR 2741.4(h)(1)–(4)) Dated: March 24, 2008. Patrick Madigan, Rawlins Field Manager. [FR Doc. E8–8023 Filed 4–15–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–22–M VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:19 Apr 15, 2008 Jkt 214001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Elk and Vegetation Management Plan, Final Environmental Impact Statement, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO National Park Service, Department of the Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability of a Record of Decision on the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Elk and Vegetation Management Plan, Rocky Mountain National Park AGENCY: SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332(2)(C), the National Park Service announces the availability of the Record of Decision for the Elk and Vegetation Management Plan, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. On February 15, 2008, the Regional Director, Intermountain Region, approved the Record of Decision for the project. As soon as practicable, the National Park Service will begin to implement the Preferred Alternative contained in the FEIS issued on January 4, 2008. The Final Plan analyzed five alternatives, including a no action alternative (Alternative 1), to manage elk and vegetation within the Park. The four action alternatives each used different combinations of management tools to reduce the elk population size and densities, redistribute elk, restore natural migration, and restore vegetation. All action alternatives emphasized adaptive management. Alternative 2 used intensive lethal reduction (culling) of elk in the first four years of the plan to reach a population size on the low end of the natural range of variation, in combination with minimal fencing. Alternative 4 used a fertility control agent along with gradual lethal reduction (culling) of elk over the 20 year life of the plan to reach a population size on the high end of the natural range of variation, in combination with a moderate amount of fencing. Alternative 5 used introduction of a small number of intensively managed wolves, along with intensive lethal reduction (culling) of elk in the first four years of the plan to reach a population size that incorporated the full range of natural variation, in combination with minimal fencing. The selected action, Alternative 3, relies on a variety of conservation tools including fencing, redistribution, vegetation restoration and lethal reduction (culling). In future years, the park will, using adaptive management principles, reevaluate opportunities to use wolves or fertility control as PO 00000 Frm 00103 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 additional tools. The selected alternative includes the gradual lethal reduction (culling) of elk by National Park Service staff and authorized agents of the National Park Service to achieve an elk population size at the high end of the natural range of variation of 1,600 to 2,100 elk (600 to 800 park subpopulation; 1,000 to 1,300 town subpopulation) by the end of the plan. Inside the park, up to 200 elk will be removed annually over 20 years. To the extent possible, elk carcasses and/or meat resulting from these actions will be donated through an organized program to eligible recipients, including tribes, based on informed consent and pursuant to applicable public health guidelines. Aspen stands (up to 160 acres) on the elk range will be fenced to exclude elk herbivory. Because this alternative will result in a target population at the high end of the natural range, up to 440 acres of suitable willow habitat will be fenced in the high elkuse areas of the primary summer and winter ranges. These temporary fences will be installed adaptively, based on vegetation response to elk management actions as indicated through a monitoring program. To reduce elk densities on the elk range outside of fenced areas, redistribution of the population will occur using herding, aversive conditioning, and use of unsuppressed weapons for culling. The plan incorporates adaptive management and monitoring to determine the level and intensity of management actions needed, including elk population reductions, fencing, herding, and aversive conditioning. Population numbers will be estimated annually and the number of animals to be removed will be determined based on the most current population estimates. If the elk population is within the defined portion of the range of natural variation and vegetation management objectives are being met, no lethal reduction activities will take place. Culling will be administered by the National Park Service and carried out by National Park Service personnel and their authorized agents. For purposes of this plan, ‘‘authorized agents’’ can include: Professional staff from other federal, state, or local agencies or tribes; contractors; or qualified volunteers. For all alternatives the full range of foreseeable environmental consequences was assessed, and appropriate mitigating measures were identified. The Record of Decision includes a statement of the decision made, synopses of other alternatives considered, the basis for the decision, a description of the environmentally E:\FR\FM\16APN1.SGM 16APN1 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 74 / Wednesday, April 16, 2008 / Notices preferable alternative, a finding on impairment of park resources and values, a listing of measures to minimize environmental harm, and an overview of public involvement in the decision-making process. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Therese Johnson, 1000 Highway 36, Rocky Mountain National Park, Estes Park, Colorado 80517, 303–772–5474, therese_johnson@nps.gov. Copies of the Record of Decision may be obtained from the contact listed above or online at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/romo. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Dated: April 3, 2008. Michael D. Snyder, Regional Director, Intermountain Region, National Park Service. [FR Doc. E8–8116 Filed 4–15–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–08–M DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service General Management Plan and Environmental Impact Statement, Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, NM National Park Service, Department of the Interior. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement for the general management plan for Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument. jlentini on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES AGENCY: SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332(C), the National Park Service is preparing an environmental impact statement for a general management plan for Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, New Mexico. The environmental impact statement will be approved by the Director, Intermountain Region. The general management plan will prescribe the resource conditions and visitor experiences that are to be achieved and maintained in the monument over the next 15 to 20 years. The clarification of what must be achieved according to law and policy will be based on review of the monument’s purpose, significance, special mandates, and the body of laws and policies directing park management. Based on determinations of desired conditions, the general management plan will outline the kinds of resource management activities, visitor activities, and development that would be appropriate in the future. A range of reasonable management alternatives will be developed through this planning process and will include, VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:08 Apr 15, 2008 Jkt 214001 at a minimum, no-action and the preferred alternative. The monument does not have a general management plan as required by the Redwood Amendment of 1978 and NPS management policies. Issues to be addressed will include but are not limited to the following: The protection and interpretation options for the cliff dwellings and TJ Ruin and long-term direction for protection and management. The needs of all users (cultural heritage visitors, wilderness hikers, nature watchers, and Native Americans) and the appropriateness and adequacy of current facilities. Identifying and analyzing various options for long-term management of the monument, adjacent land, and facilities. DATES: Any comments on the scope of issues to be addressed in the plan should be submitted no later than 30 days after publication of this notice. Public meetings regarding the general management plan will be held during the scoping period. Specific dates, times, and locations will be made available in the local media, on the National Park Service Planning, Environment and Public Comment (PEPC) Web site (http:// parkplanning.nps.gov/gicl), or by contacting the Superintendent of Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument. ADDRESSES: Information on the planning process and copies of newsletters will be available from the office of the Superintendent, HC 68 Box 100, Silver City, NM 88061–0100. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Superintendent Steve Riley, Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, HC 68 Box 100, Silver City, NM 88061–0100; phone: (505) 536–9461. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Public and agency involvement will be solicited at several key steps in the planning process including initial scoping, alternatives development, and the draft plan. If you wish to comment on any issues associated with the plan, you may submit your comments to the planning team by any one of several methods. You may mail comments to Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, HC 68 Box 100, Silver City, NM 88061–0100. You may also comment electronically at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/gicl. Finally, you may hand-deliver comments to the monument headquarters located forty-four miles north of Silver City, New Mexico, on NM Road 15. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, be PO 00000 Frm 00104 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 20711 advised that your entire comment— including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold from public review your personal identifying information, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Dated: April 2, 2008. Michael D. Snyder, Regional Director, Intermountain Region, National Park Service. [FR Doc. E8–8134 Filed 4–15–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–FA–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Availability of Draft General Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement/Wilderness Study for Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. National Park Service, Department of the Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability of Draft General Management Plan/ Environmental Impact Statement/ Wilderness Study for Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. AGENCY: SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332(2)(c), the National Park Service (NPS) announces the availability of a draft General Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement/Wilderness Study (GMP/EIS/WS) for Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Michigan. DATES: The draft GMP/EIS/WS will remain available for public review for 45 days following the publishing of the notice of availability in the Federal Register by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Public meetings will be held during the 45-day review period on the GMP/EIS/WS in Benzie, Lelanau, and Grand Traverse Counties, Michigan, in early summer 2008. In concert with one of the public meetings, a hearing on the wilderness study will be conducted consistent with Section 3(d)(1) of the Wilderness Act. Specific dates and locations will be announced in local and regional media sources of record and on the national lakeshore’s Web site. You may submit your comments by any one of several methods. You may comment via the Internet through the national lakeshore’s Web site at http:// www.nps.gov/slbe; simply click on the GMP page. You may also comment via the Internet through the NPS Planning, Environment, and Public Comment Web E:\FR\FM\16APN1.SGM 16APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 74 (Wednesday, April 16, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 20710-20711]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-8116]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Elk and Vegetation Management Plan, Final Environmental Impact 
Statement, Rocky Mountain National Park, CO

AGENCY: National Park Service, Department of the Interior.

ACTION: Notice of Availability of a Record of Decision on the Final 
Environmental Impact Statement for the Elk and Vegetation Management 
Plan, Rocky Mountain National Park

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, 42 
U.S.C. 4332(2)(C), the National Park Service announces the availability 
of the Record of Decision for the Elk and Vegetation Management Plan, 
Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. On February 15, 2008, the 
Regional Director, Intermountain Region, approved the Record of 
Decision for the project. As soon as practicable, the National Park 
Service will begin to implement the Preferred Alternative contained in 
the FEIS issued on January 4, 2008. The Final Plan analyzed five 
alternatives, including a no action alternative (Alternative 1), to 
manage elk and vegetation within the Park. The four action alternatives 
each used different combinations of management tools to reduce the elk 
population size and densities, redistribute elk, restore natural 
migration, and restore vegetation. All action alternatives emphasized 
adaptive management. Alternative 2 used intensive lethal reduction 
(culling) of elk in the first four years of the plan to reach a 
population size on the low end of the natural range of variation, in 
combination with minimal fencing. Alternative 4 used a fertility 
control agent along with gradual lethal reduction (culling) of elk over 
the 20 year life of the plan to reach a population size on the high end 
of the natural range of variation, in combination with a moderate 
amount of fencing. Alternative 5 used introduction of a small number of 
intensively managed wolves, along with intensive lethal reduction 
(culling) of elk in the first four years of the plan to reach a 
population size that incorporated the full range of natural variation, 
in combination with minimal fencing.
    The selected action, Alternative 3, relies on a variety of 
conservation tools including fencing, redistribution, vegetation 
restoration and lethal reduction (culling). In future years, the park 
will, using adaptive management principles, reevaluate opportunities to 
use wolves or fertility control as additional tools. The selected 
alternative includes the gradual lethal reduction (culling) of elk by 
National Park Service staff and authorized agents of the National Park 
Service to achieve an elk population size at the high end of the 
natural range of variation of 1,600 to 2,100 elk (600 to 800 park 
subpopulation; 1,000 to 1,300 town subpopulation) by the end of the 
plan. Inside the park, up to 200 elk will be removed annually over 20 
years. To the extent possible, elk carcasses and/or meat resulting from 
these actions will be donated through an organized program to eligible 
recipients, including tribes, based on informed consent and pursuant to 
applicable public health guidelines. Aspen stands (up to 160 acres) on 
the elk range will be fenced to exclude elk herbivory. Because this 
alternative will result in a target population at the high end of the 
natural range, up to 440 acres of suitable willow habitat will be 
fenced in the high elk-use areas of the primary summer and winter 
ranges. These temporary fences will be installed adaptively, based on 
vegetation response to elk management actions as indicated through a 
monitoring program. To reduce elk densities on the elk range outside of 
fenced areas, redistribution of the population will occur using 
herding, aversive conditioning, and use of unsuppressed weapons for 
culling. The plan incorporates adaptive management and monitoring to 
determine the level and intensity of management actions needed, 
including elk population reductions, fencing, herding, and aversive 
conditioning. Population numbers will be estimated annually and the 
number of animals to be removed will be determined based on the most 
current population estimates. If the elk population is within the 
defined portion of the range of natural variation and vegetation 
management objectives are being met, no lethal reduction activities 
will take place. Culling will be administered by the National Park 
Service and carried out by National Park Service personnel and their 
authorized agents. For purposes of this plan, ``authorized agents'' can 
include: Professional staff from other federal, state, or local 
agencies or tribes; contractors; or qualified volunteers.
    For all alternatives the full range of foreseeable environmental 
consequences was assessed, and appropriate mitigating measures were 
identified.
    The Record of Decision includes a statement of the decision made, 
synopses of other alternatives considered, the basis for the decision, 
a description of the environmentally

[[Page 20711]]

preferable alternative, a finding on impairment of park resources and 
values, a listing of measures to minimize environmental harm, and an 
overview of public involvement in the decision-making process.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Therese Johnson, 1000 Highway 36, 
Rocky Mountain National Park, Estes Park, Colorado 80517, 303-772-5474, 
therese_johnson@nps.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Copies of the Record of Decision may be 
obtained from the contact listed above or online at http://
parkplanning.nps.gov/romo.

    Dated: April 3, 2008.
Michael D. Snyder,
Regional Director, Intermountain Region, National Park Service.
 [FR Doc. E8-8116 Filed 4-15-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-08-M