60-Day Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection of Information; Opportunity for Public Comment, 13562-13563 [E8-4880]

Download as PDF mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES 13562 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 50 / Thursday, March 13, 2008 / Notices Power Company, its successors or assigns, by right-of-way N–77845, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976, 090 Stat. 2776, 43 U.S.C. 1761; (f) A right-of-way for an underground water pipeline granted to the Las Vegas Valley Water District, its successors or assigns, by right-of-way N–77998, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976, 090 Stat. 2776, 43 U.S.C. 1761; (g) A right-of-way for a sewer main granted to the Clark County Water Reclamation District, its successors or assigns, by right-of-way N–77999, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976, 090 Stat. 2776, 43 U.S.C. 1761; (h) A right-of-way for a fiber optic facility granted to Cox Communications, its successors or assigns, by right-of-way N–79655, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976, 090 Stat. 2776, 43 U.S.C. 1761; (i) A right-of-way for a natural gas pipeline granted to the Southwest Gas Corporation, its successors or assigns, by right-of-way N–79659, pursuant to the Act of February 25, 1920, 041 Stat. 0437, 30 U.S.C. 185 Sec. 28; (j) A right-of-way for a telephone line granted to the Central Telephone Company, its successors or assigns, by right-of-way N–79829, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976, 090 Stat. 2776, 43 U.S.C. 1761; (k) A right-of-way for a sewer line granted to the Clark County Water Reclamation District, its successors or assigns, by right-of-way N–79832, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976, 090 Stat. 2776, 43 U.S.C. 1761; and (l) A right-of-way for an electrical power line granted to the Nevada Power Company, its successors or assigns, by right-of-way N–80069, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976, 090 Stat. 2776, 43 U.S.C. 1761. (6) N–80173: a right-of-way for an electrical transmission line granted to the Nevada Power Company, its successors or assigns, by right-of-way N–58888, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976, 090 Stat. 2776, 43 U.S.C. 1761. (7) N–81374: no encumbering rightsof-way. Upon publication of this notice in the Federal Register, the land described above will be segregated from all other forms of appropriation under the public land laws, including the general mining laws, except for lease and subsequent conveyance under the R&PP Act, leasing under the mineral leasing laws, and disposals under the mineral material disposal laws. Interested parties may submit written comments regarding the specific use proposed in the application and plan of development, whether BLM followed proper administrative procedures in reaching the decision to lease/convey VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:19 Mar 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 under the R&PP Act, or any other factor not directly related to the suitability of the land for R&PP use. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Only written comments submitted by postal service or overnight mail to the Field Manager, BLM Las Vegas Field Office, will be considered properly filed. Electronic mail, facsimile, or telephone comments will not be considered properly filed. Any adverse comments will be reviewed by the BLM Nevada State Director, who may sustain, vacate, or modify this realty action. In the absence of any adverse comments, this realty action will become the final determination of the Department of the Interior and will become effective on May 12, 2008. The lands will not be available for lease/conveyance until after the decision becomes effective. (Authority: 43 CFR 2741.5) Dated: March 6, 2008. Kimber Liebhauser, Assistant Field Manager, Division of Lands. [FR Doc. E8–5018 Filed 3–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–HC–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service 60-Day Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection of Information; Opportunity for Public Comment Department of the Interior, National Park Service. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. AGENCY: SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 and 5 CFR part 1320, Reporting and Record Keeping Requirements, the National Park Service (NPS) invites public comments on a proposed new collection of information (1024–xxxx). DATES: Public comments will be accepted on the proposed Information Collection Request (ICR) on or before May 12, 2008. ADDRESSES: Send Comments To: Dr. Susan A. Crate, co-PI, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University, 4400 PO 00000 Frm 00039 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 University Drive, MS 5F2, Fairfax, Virginia 22030; or via phone at 703/ 993–1517; or via fax at 703/993–1066; or via e-mail at pogogmu@gmu.edu. Also, you may send comments to Leonard Stowe, NPS Information Collection Clearance Officer, 1849 C St., NW. (2605), Washington, DC 20240; or via email at leonard stow@nps.gov. All responses to this notice will be summarized and included in the request for the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval. All comments will become a matter of public record. To Request a Draft of Proposed Collection of Information, Contact Dr. Susan A. Crate, co-PI, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MS 5F2, Fairfax, Virginia 22030; or via phone at 703/ 993–1517; or via fax at 703/993–1066; or via e-mail at pogogmu@gmu.edu. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. James Gramann, NPS Social Science Program, 1201 ‘‘Eye’’ St., Washington, DC 20005; or via phone 202/513–7189; or via e-mail James_Gramann@partner.nps.gov. You are entitled to a copy of the entire ICR package free of charge once the package is submitted to OMB for review. You can access this ICR at www.reginfo.gov/ public/. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Potomac Gorge Survey. Bureau Form Number: None. OMB Number: To be requested. Expiration Date: To be requested. Type of Request: New Collection. Description of Need: The Potomac Gorge is a IS-mile stretch along the Potomac River, crossing jurisdictions in the states of Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Public parkland in the Gorge includes the NPS’s Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park and George Washington Memorial Parkway. The Nature Conservancy and Potomac Conservancy own and protect areas in the Gorge. In addition, other public and private lands are included in the 10,000-acre area. The Gorge is one of the country’s most biologically diverse areas, home to more than 1,400 plant species. The NPS has documented at least 30 distinct natural vegetation communities, several of which are globally rare and imperiled. The Potomac Gorge Site Conservation Plan (SCP), developed by the NPS and The Nature Conservancy, identifies conservation targets, analyzes threats to these targets, and presents strategies for mitigating environmental problems currently observed in the Potomac Gorge. Identified threats include both internal impacts inherent to a heavily E:\FR\FM\13MRN1.SGM 13MRN1 mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 50 / Thursday, March 13, 2008 / Notices visited area and external drivers originating from densely populated adjacent landscapes. The SCP considered seven conservation targets: Riparian Communities, Groundwater Invertebrates, Terrace Communities, Anadromous Fish, Upland Forest, Tributary Stream Systems, and Wetlands. Of these conservation targets, only tributary stream systems hold a ‘‘Very High’’ threat status. Therefore, promoting Best Management Practices among neighbors of the Potomac Gorge to improve water quality in tributary streams is one of the priority actions in the SCP. To better understand and mitigate the tributary stream threats, the Potomac Gorge Survey will gather information that will improve the understanding of NPS personnel as to the behaviors of local land owners that affect water quality in tributary streams and the socio-demographic characteristics that are associated with particular behaviors. The survey will be administered to a stratified random sample of residents in the Potomac Gorge watershed. The Potomac Gorge Survey includes questions relating to residents’ choice of land use practices and behaviors that affect water resources in the Gorge, and residents’ demographic profiles, mobility, information, attitudes, and beliefs. Survey data will be analyzed using statistical analysis to investigate the responsiveness of residents’ environmental attitudes and behaviors to changes in demographic, cultural, and informational drivers of behavior. This pilot project will identify priorities for future work within the Potomac Gorge as well as provide a generalized application in social science issues confronting the National Parks as a whole. Landowner participation to respond is voluntary. Automated data collection: This information will be collected primarily via telephone surveys with an option for those contacted to complete the survey on the internet, if preferred. No automated data collection will take place. Description of respondents: Respondents will be among a random sample of watershed residents stratified by zip code. Estimated average number of respondents: 400 respondents. Estimated average number of responses: 400 responses. Estimated average burden hours per response: 1 minute for non-respondents and 20 minutes for respondents. Frequency of Response: 1 time per respondent. Estimated annual reporting burden: 3,433 hours. VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:19 Mar 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 Comments are invited on: (1) The practical utility of the information being gathered; (2) the accuracy of the burden hour estimate; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) ways to minimize the burden to respondents, including use of automated information collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Dated: March 5, 2008. Leonard E. Stowe, NPS, Information Collection Clearance Officer. [FR Doc. E8–4880 Filed 3–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–M DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Final Environmental Impact Statement/ General Management Plan, Olympic National Park; Clallam, Gray’s Harbor, Jefferson and Mason Counties, WA; Notice of Availability SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332(2)(C), the National Park Service (NPS) has prepared a Final Environmental Impact Statement for the proposed General Management Plan (Final GMP/EIS), Olympic National Park, Washington. The purpose of the GMP is to provide management direction for resource protection and visitor use at Olympic National Park for the next 15 to 20 years. A GMP is needed to confirm the purpose and significance of the park, to clearly define resource conditions and visitor experiences to be achieved in the park, to provide a framework for park managers to use when making decisions as to how to best protect park resources and provide for a diverse range of visitor experiences, to ensure a foundation for decision making in consultation with interested stakeholders, and to serve as the basis for more detailed management documents. In addition to a ‘‘baseline’’ no-action alternative (Alternative A) which would maintain current management, the Final GMP/EIS PO 00000 Frm 00040 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 13563 describes and analyzes three ‘‘action’’ alternatives. Alternative B emphasizes cultural and natural resource protection and natural processes would take priority over visitor access in certain areas of the park. Alternative C emphasizes increased recreational and visitor opportunities. Alternative D is the ‘‘management preferred’’ alternative; it is a combination of the other alternatives, emphasizing both protection of park resources and improving visitor experiences. The foreseeable environmental consequences of all the alternatives, and mitigation strategies, are identified and analyzed; as documented in the Final EIS, Alternative D is deemed to be the ‘‘environmentally preferred’’ course of action. Description of Alternatives: The Final GMP/EIS includes three action alternatives and a no-action alternative. The no-action alternative (Alternative A) assumes that existing programs, facilities, staffing, and funding would generally continue at their current levels, and the current management practices would continue. There would be no zoning designated within the park, and issues would be evaluated on a case-by-case basis without a long range plan or vision. The park would continue to be managed in accordance with existing plans and policies. Alternative B emphasizes cultural and natural resource protection; natural processes would have priority over visitor access in certain areas of the park. In general, the park would be managed as a large ecosystem preserve emphasizing wilderness management for resource conservation and protection, with a reduced number of facilities to support visitation. Some roads and facilities would be moved or closed to protect natural processes, and visitor access and services in sensitive areas would be reduced. Boundary adjustments for the purposes of resource protection would be considered adjacent to the park in the Ozette, Lake Crescent, Hoh, Queets, and Quinault areas. When compared with the other alternatives, this alternative would have less front country acreage designated as development, and more acreage designated as low-use and day-use zones. This alternative includes a river zone and an intertidal reserve zone. Alternative C emphasizes increased recreational and visitor opportunities. The natural and cultural resources are protected through management actions and resource education programs. However, maintaining access to existing facilities would be a priority, and access would be retained to all existing front country areas or increased by improving E:\FR\FM\13MRN1.SGM 13MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 50 (Thursday, March 13, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 13562-13563]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-4880]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


60-Day Notice of Intention To Request Clearance of Collection of 
Information; Opportunity for Public Comment

AGENCY: Department of the Interior, National Park Service.

ACTION: Notice and request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 
and 5 CFR part 1320, Reporting and Record Keeping Requirements, the 
National Park Service (NPS) invites public comments on a proposed new 
collection of information (1024-xxxx).

DATES: Public comments will be accepted on the proposed Information 
Collection Request (ICR) on or before May 12, 2008.

ADDRESSES: Send Comments To: Dr. Susan A. Crate, co-PI, Department of 
Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University, 4400 
University Drive, MS 5F2, Fairfax, Virginia 22030; or via phone at 703/
993-1517; or via fax at 703/993-1066; or via e-mail at pogogmu@gmu.edu. 
Also, you may send comments to Leonard Stowe, NPS Information 
Collection Clearance Officer, 1849 C St., NW. (2605), Washington, DC 
20240; or via e-mail at leonard stow@nps.gov. All responses to this 
notice will be summarized and included in the request for the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) approval. All comments will become a matter 
of public record.
    To Request a Draft of Proposed Collection of Information, Contact 
Dr. Susan A. Crate, co-PI, Department of Environmental Science and 
Policy, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MS 5F2, 
Fairfax, Virginia 22030; or via phone at 703/993-1517; or via fax at 
703/993-1066; or via e-mail at pogogmu@gmu.edu.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. James Gramann, NPS Social Science 
Program, 1201 ``Eye'' St., Washington, DC 20005; or via phone 202/513-
7189; or via e-mail James_Gramann@partner.nps.gov. You are entitled to 
a copy of the entire ICR package free of charge once the package is 
submitted to OMB for review. You can access this ICR at 
www.reginfo.gov/public/.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
    Title: Potomac Gorge Survey.
    Bureau Form Number: None.
    OMB Number: To be requested.
    Expiration Date: To be requested.
    Type of Request: New Collection.
    Description of Need: The Potomac Gorge is a IS-mile stretch along 
the Potomac River, crossing jurisdictions in the states of Maryland, 
Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Public parkland in the Gorge 
includes the NPS's Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park 
and George Washington Memorial Parkway. The Nature Conservancy and 
Potomac Conservancy own and protect areas in the Gorge. In addition, 
other public and private lands are included in the 10,000-acre area. 
The Gorge is one of the country's most biologically diverse areas, home 
to more than 1,400 plant species. The NPS has documented at least 30 
distinct natural vegetation communities, several of which are globally 
rare and imperiled. The Potomac Gorge Site Conservation Plan (SCP), 
developed by the NPS and The Nature Conservancy, identifies 
conservation targets, analyzes threats to these targets, and presents 
strategies for mitigating environmental problems currently observed in 
the Potomac Gorge. Identified threats include both internal impacts 
inherent to a heavily

[[Page 13563]]

visited area and external drivers originating from densely populated 
adjacent landscapes. The SCP considered seven conservation targets: 
Riparian Communities, Groundwater Invertebrates, Terrace Communities, 
Anadromous Fish, Upland Forest, Tributary Stream Systems, and Wetlands. 
Of these conservation targets, only tributary stream systems hold a 
``Very High'' threat status. Therefore, promoting Best Management 
Practices among neighbors of the Potomac Gorge to improve water quality 
in tributary streams is one of the priority actions in the SCP.
    To better understand and mitigate the tributary stream threats, the 
Potomac Gorge Survey will gather information that will improve the 
understanding of NPS personnel as to the behaviors of local land owners 
that affect water quality in tributary streams and the socio-
demographic characteristics that are associated with particular 
behaviors. The survey will be administered to a stratified random 
sample of residents in the Potomac Gorge watershed. The Potomac Gorge 
Survey includes questions relating to residents' choice of land use 
practices and behaviors that affect water resources in the Gorge, and 
residents' demographic profiles, mobility, information, attitudes, and 
beliefs. Survey data will be analyzed using statistical analysis to 
investigate the responsiveness of residents' environmental attitudes 
and behaviors to changes in demographic, cultural, and informational 
drivers of behavior. This pilot project will identify priorities for 
future work within the Potomac Gorge as well as provide a generalized 
application in social science issues confronting the National Parks as 
a whole. Landowner participation to respond is voluntary.
    Automated data collection: This information will be collected 
primarily via telephone surveys with an option for those contacted to 
complete the survey on the internet, if preferred. No automated data 
collection will take place.
    Description of respondents: Respondents will be among a random 
sample of watershed residents stratified by zip code.
    Estimated average number of respondents: 400 respondents.
    Estimated average number of responses: 400 responses.
    Estimated average burden hours per response: 1 minute for non-
respondents and 20 minutes for respondents.
    Frequency of Response: 1 time per respondent.
    Estimated annual reporting burden: 3,433 hours.
    Comments are invited on: (1) The practical utility of the 
information being gathered; (2) the accuracy of the burden hour 
estimate; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the 
information to be collected; and (4) ways to minimize the burden to 
respondents, including use of automated information collection 
techniques or other forms of information technology. Before including 
your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal 
identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your 
entire comment--including your personal identifying information--may be 
made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your 
comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public 
review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.

    Dated: March 5, 2008.
Leonard E. Stowe,
NPS, Information Collection Clearance Officer.
[FR Doc. E8-4880 Filed 3-12-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-M