Notice of Inventory Completion: Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Hastings, NE, 12212-12214 [E8-4325]

Download as PDF mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES 12212 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 45 / Thursday, March 6, 2008 / Notices known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Research conducted at the Nebraska State Historical Society identifies at least 15 sites in the area around Palmer. One site is known as the Palmer Village (25HW1), which is a well known site that was occupied by the Skidi band of the Pawnee from at least A.D. 1804 to A.D. 1836, and was observed and recorded by a number of explorers to the area. Museum officials have been able to document Mr. Brooking and Mr. Hill as having conducted excavations at the Palmer Village. Waldo Wedel conducted an official survey of the Palmer Village on June 13, 1936 for the Nebraska State Historical Society. John Johnson owned the land at the time of the survey and allowed some work. It is likely that the some of the village spread into and resides on land once owned by H. Goering whose land is adjacent to Mr. Johnson’s land. The site is designated as an historic Skidi Pawnee earthlodge village. Museum officials have determined, based on museum records and evidence of donors associated with the site, that the above human remains and associated funerary objects are from sites associated with a Skidi village, possibly the Palmer Village, and are culturally affiliated with the Pawnee. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from a grave near Cushing, Howard County, NE. The human remains were donated to the Hastings Museum by Robert Merchant and cataloged in 1960 (29365). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. There are no known sites attributed to Cushing, NE. However, there are numerous sites attributed to the Palmer area, which is 10 miles to the southeast of Cushing. The Palmer Site (25HW1) is located northwest of the town of Palmer, making it also in the vicinity of Cushing. Based on this information, morphology report, and geographic region of Pawnee occupation, museum officials have determined that the human remains probably came from the Palmer site and are highly likely to be culturally affiliated with the Pawnee. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals were removed from the Hanna Larson Site (25PT1) in Platte County, NE. The human remains were excavated from the yard of Wm. Christman and donated by Mr. Christman to the Hastings Museum in 1944 (24733). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:57 Mar 05, 2008 Jkt 214001 Nebraska State Historical Society and museum records are consistent with information on the site known as the Hanna Larson Site. The site was occupied form A.D. 1650 to A.D. 1750 and is culturally identified with the Lower Loup Focus of the Pahuk Aspect of the late Ceramic Period. The Lower Loup Phase sites are located in areas also associated with historic Pawnee sites. The Lower Loup material culture suggests that they are ancestors of the Pawnee. Descendants of the Pawnee are members of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma. According to museum records, the human remains were originally cataloged as a complete or nearly complete skeleton for each of these individuals (02983, 03177, 03224, 03255, 01797, 06452, 03202, 11216, 24733). However, during inventory review in the 1990s, only cranial and partial post cranial remains were found with the accession numbers. Also during inventory review, the museum identified a number of commingled human remains that had been in an exhibit in the late 1930s or early 1940s, which represented human remains taken from ossuaries. When the exhibit closed, unnumbered human remains were mingled together. Officials of the Hastings Museum reasonably believe that some of the commingled remains are part of the individuals described above. An additional site that is reasonably believed to have commingled human remains from this exhibit are described in a companion notice. Officials of the Hastings Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 63 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Hastings Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 1,085 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Hastings Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Teresa Kreutzer–Hodson, Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History, 1330 N Burlington, PO PO 00000 Frm 00143 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Box 1286, Hastings, NE 68902, telephone (402) 461–2399, before April 7, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Hastings Museum is responsible for notifying the Crow Tribe of Montana; Omaha Tribe of Nebraska; Otoe– Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; Ponca Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Ponca Tribe of Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota; and Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma that this notice has been published Dated: January 30, 2008. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–4323 Filed 3–5–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Hastings, NE National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Hastings, NE. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from the Franklin, Harlan, and Webster Counties, NE. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Crow Tribe of Montana; Omaha Tribe of Nebraska; Otoe–Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; E:\FR\FM\06MRN1.SGM 06MRN1 mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 45 / Thursday, March 6, 2008 / Notices Ponca Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Ponca Tribe of Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota; and Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma. In June 1926, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the Marshall Ossuary (25HN1) in Harlan County, NE. The human remains were donated to the Hastings Museum by A.M. Brooking, the museum founder (03635). No known individual was identified. The 2,339 associated funerary objects are 2,339 shell beads of various sizes (03636). The Marshall Ossuary is located on the Republican River and is believed to have been used by the people of the Plains Woodland or Central Plains Tradition. On April 1, 1938, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the Wentworth site in Franklin County, NE. The human remains were donated to the museum by Les Goldsbury and cataloged in 1938 (18072). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Archeological evidence indicates that the Plains Woodland, Central Plains Tradition, and Pawnee people have sporadically lived and hunted in what is now Franklin County. On unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from a grave 2 miles southwest of Franklin in Franklin County, NE. The human remains were given to the Hastings Museum by Les Goldsbury and cataloged in 1936 (16019). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals were removed from an unknown site around Bloomington, Franklin County, NE. The human remains were donated to the Hastings Museum by Les Goldsbury, Garret Fritzson and A.M. Brooking, and cataloged in 1936 (16024). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from an ossuary near Guide Rock, Webster County, NE. The human remains were donated to the Hastings Museum by A.M. Brooking and cataloged in 1934 (12620). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:57 Mar 05, 2008 Jkt 214001 In 1932, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were removed from unknown sites near Guide Rock in Webster County, NE. The human remains were donated to the Hastings Museum by J.C. Samms and A.T. Hill and cataloged in 1934 (12645, 12646, 12647). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from one or more ossuaries near Guide Rock, Webster County, NE. The human remains were donated to the Hastings Museum by unknown donors and cataloged between 1934 and 1935 (14015, 13120). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. According to museum records, the human remains from 2 miles southwest of Franklin in Franklin County were originally cataloged as a complete or nearly complete skeleton for each of the individuals (16019). However, during inventory review in the 1990s, only cranial and partial post cranial remains were found with the accession numbers. Also during inventory review, the museum identified a number of commingled human remains that had been in an exhibit in the late 1930s or early 1940s, which represented human remains taken from ossuaries. When the exhibit closed, unnumbered human remains were mingled together. Officials of the Hastings Museum reasonably believe that some of the commingled remains are part of the individuals described above. Additional sites with commingled human remains are listed in a companion notice. Franklin and Webster Counties are spanned by the Republican River and have rich river bottoms conducive to agriculture. The Plains Woodland, Central Plains Tradition, and Pawnee people have sporadically lived and hunted in this region for over 1,000 years. There are several known village sites, burial mounds, and ossuaries located within the counties that document all three cultural occupations of this area. Based on museum records, geographic region, documented sites, and morphology reports, museum officials have determined that the human remains are likely associated with Plains Woodland, Central Plains Tradition or Pawnee. Pawnee oral tradition states that the Central Plains Tradition people are ancestors to the Arikara and Pawnee, and possibly the Wichita. According to Pawnee oral history the Plains Woodlands people are ancestor to the Pawnee, Mandan, Arikara, Hidatsa, and PO 00000 Frm 00144 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 12213 Crow. Oral history information has some of the people of Mill Creek staying behind and becoming part of the Central Plains Tradition based on common oral traditions through origin and corn stories. Museum officials have determined based on museum records, geographic location, Pawnee oral tradition, and anthropological research that the Central Plains Tradition people are ancestors to the Arikara and Pawnee, and possibly the Wichita. In addition, museum officials have determined based on museum records, geographic location and oral tradition that the Plains Woodland people are ancestors of the Arikara, Crow, Hidatsa, Mandan, and Pawnee. The Arikara, Pawnee, and Wichita have entered into an agreement that human remains and funerary objects located between the Missouri River and the Smokey Hill River shall be claimed by the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma. The Hidatsa have also agreed that the Pawnee shall make the claim for people and items affiliated with the Plains Woodland from Nebraska. Officials of the Hastings Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 15 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Hastings Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 2,339 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Hastings Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Crow Tribe of Montana; Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota; and Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Teresa Kreutzer–Hodson, Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History, 1330 N Burlington, PO Box 1286, Hastings, NE 68902, telephone (402) 461–2399, before April 7, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. E:\FR\FM\06MRN1.SGM 06MRN1 12214 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 45 / Thursday, March 6, 2008 / Notices The Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History is responsible for notifying the Crow Tribe of Montana; Omaha Tribe of Nebraska; Otoe– Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; Ponca Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Ponca Tribe of Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota; and Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: January 30, 2008. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–4325 Filed 3–5–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Texas Department of Transportation, Austin, TX National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Texas Department of Transportation, Austin, TX. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Titus County, TX. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the professional archeological staff of the Texas Department of Transportation in consultation with representatives of the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma. In 1973, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the Alex Justiss Site, 41TT13, in Titus County, TX. No known individual was identified. The 94 associated funerary objects are 39 ceramic sherds, 1 Talco arrow point, 2 untyped arrow points, 1 core, 1 grooved hematitic sandstone, 48 pieces of lithic VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:57 Mar 05, 2008 Jkt 214001 debitage, and 2 organic matter (nutshells). In 1975, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from the Alex Justiss Site, 41TT13, in Titus County, TX. No known individuals were identified. The 251 associated funerary objects are 73 ceramic sherds, 4 Talco arrow points, 3 Maud arrow points, 1 Alba arrow point, 1 Perdiz arrow point, 5 Gary dart points, 1 Yarbrough dart point, 1 gouge, 1 pitted stone, 2 ground stones, 1 hammerstone, 1 end scraper, 6 bifaces, 4 cores, and 147 pieces of lithic debitage. In 2001, human remains representing a minimum of 18 individuals were removed from the Alex Justiss Site, 41TT13, in Titus County, TX. No known individuals were identified. The 1,089 associated funerary objects are 14 ceramic vessels (ceramic vessels include 6 jars, 5 bottles, and 3 carinated bowls); 313 ceramic sherds; 1 pipe stem; 70 Talco arrow points; 1 Bassett arrow point; 1 Harrell arrow point; 1 Perdiz arrow point; 3 Washita arrow points; 2 untyped arrow points; 1 celt; 4 Gary dart points; 6 untyped dart point and fragments; 3 groundstones; 1 hammerstone; 4 cores; 529 pieces of lithic debitage; 73 non-human bones; 1 snail shell; 43 soil samples; and 18 carbon samples. In 1959, the Alex Justiss Site, 41TT13, was identified by a local collector, Edward German, when a firebreak on the property of Alex Justiss exposed a prehistoric burial. There is evidence of earlier occupation at site 41TT13 during the Late Archaic and Late Caddo periods. In 1973, plans were made to widen SH 49 between FM 144 and FM 1735, and test excavations by the Texas Department of Transportation confirmed the presence of a Titus phase Caddo cemetery on the south side of the highway. The site was determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places and data recovery excavations were designed to mitigate the effects of the construction on the site. These excavations were conducted in 1975, but SH 49 was not widened at that time. In 2000, the plan to widen SH 49 was re–evaluated. Archeological avoidance was not feasible and determined that the earlier excavation did not meet current archeological standards. In consultations with the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma it was determined that the portion of the Caddo cemetery within the right of way of SH 49 was to be re– excavated. These excavations took place in 2001 and additional human remains were removed from the site. The later development of the Caddo Cemetery, and 19th and 20th century’s historic PO 00000 Frm 00145 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 activities disturbed and mixed the earlier occupation artifacts into the burial fill and surrounding soil. As a result it is impossible to determine if excavated artifacts such as debitage, sherds, and broken tools were intentional funerary objects or accidentally incorporated into the Caddo Cemetery complex. However, based on the preponderance of the evidence, officials of the Texas Department of Transportation reasonably believe the artifacts are associated funerary objects. Ceramic types represented in the burial assemblage include Wilder Engraved, Bullard Brushed, Pease Brushed–Incised, La Rue Neck Banded, Taylor Engraved, Ripley Engraved, and Keno Trailed. The types of decorated ceramics represented in the ceramic assemblage and the abundance of Talco arrow points indicate that the cemetery was used by a Caddo group during the Titus phase (A.D. 1400–1680). Texas Department of Transportation has determined that based upon the lithic and ceramic assemblages that the Alex Justiss site was occupied by a Caddo group. Descendants of the Caddo are members of the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma. Officials of the Texas Department of Transportation have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 21 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Texas Department of Transportation also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 1,434 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Texas Department of Transportation have determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Scott Pletka, Ph.D., Supervisor, Archeological Studies Program, Texas Department of Transportation, 125 E. 11th Street, Austin, TX 78701–2483, telephone (512) 416–2631, before April 7, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. E:\FR\FM\06MRN1.SGM 06MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 45 (Thursday, March 6, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 12212-12214]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-4325]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Hastings Museum of Natural and 
Cultural History, Hastings, NE

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural 
History, Hastings, NE. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from the Franklin, Harlan, and Webster Counties, 
NE.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Hastings 
Museum of Natural and Cultural History professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of the Crow Tribe of Montana; Omaha 
Tribe of Nebraska; Otoe-Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; Pawnee 
Nation of Oklahoma;

[[Page 12213]]

Ponca Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Ponca Tribe of Nebraska; Sac & Fox 
Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Three Affiliated Tribes of 
the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota; and Wichita and Affiliated 
Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma.
    In June 1926, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from the Marshall Ossuary (25HN1) in Harlan 
County, NE. The human remains were donated to the Hastings Museum by 
A.M. Brooking, the museum founder (03635). No known individual was 
identified. The 2,339 associated funerary objects are 2,339 shell beads 
of various sizes (03636).
    The Marshall Ossuary is located on the Republican River and is 
believed to have been used by the people of the Plains Woodland or 
Central Plains Tradition.
    On April 1, 1938, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from the Wentworth site in Franklin County, NE. 
The human remains were donated to the museum by Les Goldsbury and 
cataloged in 1938 (18072). No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Archeological evidence indicates that the Plains Woodland, Central 
Plains Tradition, and Pawnee people have sporadically lived and hunted 
in what is now Franklin County.
    On unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of two 
individuals were removed from a grave 2 miles southwest of Franklin in 
Franklin County, NE. The human remains were given to the Hastings 
Museum by Les Goldsbury and cataloged in 1936 (16019). No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of four 
individuals were removed from an unknown site around Bloomington, 
Franklin County, NE. The human remains were donated to the Hastings 
Museum by Les Goldsbury, Garret Fritzson and A.M. Brooking, and 
cataloged in 1936 (16024). No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of two 
individuals were removed from an ossuary near Guide Rock, Webster 
County, NE. The human remains were donated to the Hastings Museum by 
A.M. Brooking and cataloged in 1934 (12620). No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1932, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
were removed from unknown sites near Guide Rock in Webster County, NE. 
The human remains were donated to the Hastings Museum by J.C. Samms and 
A.T. Hill and cataloged in 1934 (12645, 12646, 12647). No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of two 
individuals were removed from one or more ossuaries near Guide Rock, 
Webster County, NE. The human remains were donated to the Hastings 
Museum by unknown donors and cataloged between 1934 and 1935 (14015, 
13120). No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    According to museum records, the human remains from 2 miles 
southwest of Franklin in Franklin County were originally cataloged as a 
complete or nearly complete skeleton for each of the individuals 
(16019). However, during inventory review in the 1990s, only cranial 
and partial post cranial remains were found with the accession numbers. 
Also during inventory review, the museum identified a number of 
commingled human remains that had been in an exhibit in the late 1930s 
or early 1940s, which represented human remains taken from ossuaries. 
When the exhibit closed, unnumbered human remains were mingled 
together. Officials of the Hastings Museum reasonably believe that some 
of the commingled remains are part of the individuals described above. 
Additional sites with commingled human remains are listed in a 
companion notice.
    Franklin and Webster Counties are spanned by the Republican River 
and have rich river bottoms conducive to agriculture. The Plains 
Woodland, Central Plains Tradition, and Pawnee people have sporadically 
lived and hunted in this region for over 1,000 years. There are several 
known village sites, burial mounds, and ossuaries located within the 
counties that document all three cultural occupations of this area. 
Based on museum records, geographic region, documented sites, and 
morphology reports, museum officials have determined that the human 
remains are likely associated with Plains Woodland, Central Plains 
Tradition or Pawnee.
    Pawnee oral tradition states that the Central Plains Tradition 
people are ancestors to the Arikara and Pawnee, and possibly the 
Wichita. According to Pawnee oral history the Plains Woodlands people 
are ancestor to the Pawnee, Mandan, Arikara, Hidatsa, and Crow. Oral 
history information has some of the people of Mill Creek staying behind 
and becoming part of the Central Plains Tradition based on common oral 
traditions through origin and corn stories.
    Museum officials have determined based on museum records, 
geographic location, Pawnee oral tradition, and anthropological 
research that the Central Plains Tradition people are ancestors to the 
Arikara and Pawnee, and possibly the Wichita. In addition, museum 
officials have determined based on museum records, geographic location 
and oral tradition that the Plains Woodland people are ancestors of the 
Arikara, Crow, Hidatsa, Mandan, and Pawnee. The Arikara, Pawnee, and 
Wichita have entered into an agreement that human remains and funerary 
objects located between the Missouri River and the Smokey Hill River 
shall be claimed by the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma. The Hidatsa have 
also agreed that the Pawnee shall make the claim for people and items 
affiliated with the Plains Woodland from Nebraska.
    Officials of the Hastings Museum have determined that, pursuant to 
25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described above represent the 
physical remains of 15 individuals of Native American ancestry. 
Officials of the Hastings Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 
25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 2,339 objects described above are reasonably 
believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at 
the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. 
Lastly, officials of the Hastings Museum have determined that, pursuant 
to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity 
that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains 
and associated funerary objects and the Crow Tribe of Montana; Pawnee 
Nation of Oklahoma; Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold 
Reservation, North Dakota; and Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, 
Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Teresa Kreutzer-Hodson, Hastings Museum of 
Natural and Cultural History, 1330 N Burlington, PO Box 1286, Hastings, 
NE 68902, telephone (402) 461-2399, before April 7, 2008. Repatriation 
of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Pawnee 
Nation of Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional 
claimants come forward.

[[Page 12214]]

    The Hastings Museum of Natural and Cultural History is responsible 
for notifying the Crow Tribe of Montana; Omaha Tribe of Nebraska; Otoe-
Missouria Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; Ponca 
Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Ponca Tribe of Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation 
of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort 
Berthold Reservation, North Dakota; and Wichita and Affiliated Tribes 
(Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: January 30, 2008.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-4325 Filed 3-5-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S