Pesticide Emergency Exemptions; Agency Decisions and State and Federal Agency Crisis Declarations, 11114-11116 [E8-3491]

Download as PDF rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with NOTICES 11114 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 41 / Friday, February 29, 2008 / Notices scientific advisory committee. The CASAC provides advice, information and recommendations on the scientific and technical aspects of issues related to air quality criteria and NAAQS under sections 108 and 109 of the Act. The CASAC is chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), as amended, 5 U.S.C., App. The SAB Staff Office established the CASAC AAMM Subcommittee in 2004 as a standing subcommittee to provide the EPA Administrator, through the CASAC, with advice and recommendations, as necessary, on topical areas related to ambient air monitoring, methods and networks. The Subcommittee complies with the provisions of FACA and all appropriate SAB Staff Office procedural policies. Section 109(d)(1) of the CAA requires that the Agency periodically review and revise, as appropriate, the air quality criteria and the NAAQS for the six ‘‘criteria’’ air pollutants, including lead. The current review of the Lead NAAQS was initiated in early 2005. In December 2007, the CASAC Lead Review Panel met to conduct a review of the Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) on the NAAQS for Lead. The Lead Panel also reviewed the Agency’s Final Lead Staff Paper and the Final Lead Risk Assessment Report. The CASAC’s report to the EPA Administrator concerning this review (EPA–CASAC–08–007, dated January 22, 2008) is posted on the CASAC Web page that can be accessed at the URL address provided above. In this report, the CASAC noted that Agency staff, in its Final Lead Staff Paper, had recommended that the Administrator consider retaining lead in total suspended particulates (Pb-TSP) as the indicator for ambient lead. While, historically, the Lead NAAQS has relied on TSP samples for quantifying ambient lead concentrations, the CASAC recommended that EPA should transition to lead in PM10 (Pb-PM10) sampling for quantifying ambient lead concentrations. In particular, the CASAC observed that Pb-PM10 is a much more accurate and precisely measured indicator and represents the fraction of lead that is more relevant for human exposures. Furthermore, the CASAC noted that there is a greater availability of Pb-PM10 samplers than Pb-TSP samplers throughout the U.S. Additionally, the CASAC found the existing Pb-TSP network inadequate in its ability to characterize population exposures, conditions around large sources, and concentrations at typical ambient concentrations in many parts of the country. CASAC also indicated in the letter that its AAMM Subcommittee would be better-suited to provide advice VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:22 Feb 28, 2008 Jkt 214001 on lead monitoring and network design issues. Accordingly, the purpose of this public teleconference meeting is for the Subcommittee to conduct a consultation with Agency staff on several draft EPA documents relating to the ambient air monitoring of Pb-PM10, including options for the Lead NAAQS indicator, a draft Federal Reference Method (FRM) for Pb-PM10, lead monitoring network design, and sampling frequency. The SAB Staff Office has developed the consultation as a mechanism to provide early input and advice to EPA on technical issues that should be considered in the development of regulations, guidelines, or technical guidance before the Agency has taken a position. Technical Contacts: Any technical questions concerning these Lead NAAQS indicator and ambient air monitoring issues can be directed to Mr. Kevin Cavender, OAQPS, at phone: (919) 541–2364, or e-mail: cavender.kevin@epa.gov; or to Mr. Lewis Weinstock, OAQPS, at phone: (919) 541–3661, or e-mail: weinstock.lewis@epa.gov. Availability of Meeting Materials: On or about March 3, 2008, the Agency will post the documents to be discussed during this consultation on the EPA Technology Transfer Network (TTN) Web page for the Lead NAAQS, ‘‘Lead (Pb)—Documents from Current Review—Technical Documents,’’ found at: http://www.epa.gov/ttn/naaqs/ standards/pb/s_pb_cr_td.html. In addition, the Agency will announce the availability of these materials, to include the process for submitting public comments on these documents, by means of a separate Federal Register notice to be published around the first week in March. Furthermore, a copy of the draft agenda and other materials for this CASAC teleconference will be posted on the SAB Web site at: http:// yosemite.epa.gov/sab/sabproduct.nsf/ WebCASAC/recentadditions prior to the meeting. Procedures for Providing Public Input: Interested members of the public may submit relevant written or oral information for the CASAC AAMM Subcommittee to consider on the topics included in this advisory activity and/ or the group conducting the activity. Oral Statements: In general, individuals or groups requesting an oral presentation at a public teleconference will be limited to three minutes per speaker, with no more than a total of 30 minutes for all speakers. Interested parties should contact Mr. Butterfield, DFO, in writing (preferably via e-mail), by March 18, 2008, at the contact information noted above, to be placed PO 00000 Frm 00027 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 on the list of public speakers for this meeting. Written Statements: Written statements should be received in the SAB Staff Office by March 21, 2008, so that the information may be made available to the Subcommittee for its consideration prior to this teleconference. Written statements should be supplied to the DFO electronically via e-mail (acceptable file formats: Adobe PDF, MS Word, WordPerfect, MS PowerPoint, or Rich Text files in IBM–PC/Windows 98/ 2000/XP format). Accessibility: For information on access or services for individuals with disabilities, please contact Mr. Butterfield at the phone number or email address noted above, preferably at least ten days prior to the meeting, to give EPA as much time as possible to process your request. Dated: February 25, 2008. Anthony F. Maciorowski, Deputy Director, EPA Science Advisory Board Staff Office. [FR Doc. E8–3933 Filed 2–28–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560–50–P ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [EPA–HQ–OPP–2007–1056; FRL–8350–5] Pesticide Emergency Exemptions; Agency Decisions and State and Federal Agency Crisis Declarations Editorial Note: This notice did not appear in the issue of Wednesday, February 27, 2008. As a result, it is being printed in its entirety. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: SUMMARY: EPA has granted or denied emergency exemptions under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) for use of pesticides as listed in this notice. The exemptions or denials were granted during the period October 1, 2007 through December 31, 2007 to control unforeseen pest outbreaks. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: See each emergency exemption or denial for the name of a contact person. The following information applies to all contact persons: Team Leader, Emergency Response Team, Registration Division (7505P), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460–0001; telephone number: (703) 308–9366. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: E:\FR\FM\29FEN1.SGM 29FEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 41 / Friday, February 29, 2008 / Notices I. General Information A. Does this Action Apply to Me? You may be potentially affected by this action if you are an agricultural producer, food manufacturer, or pesticide manufacturer. Potentially affected entities may include, but are not limited to: • Crop production (NAICS code 111). • Animal production (NAICS code 112). • Food manufacturing (NAICS code 311). • Pesticide manufacturing (NAICS code 32532). This listing is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather provides a guide for readers regarding entities likely to be affected by this action. Other types of entities not listed in this unit could also be affected. The North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) codes have been provided to assist you and others in determining whether this action might apply to certain entities. To determine whether you or your business may be affected by this action, you should carefully examine the applicability provisions discussed above. If you have any questions regarding the applicability of this action to a particular entity, consult the person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. B. How Can I Get Copies of this Document and Other Related Information? 1. Docket. EPA has established a docket for this action under docket identification (ID) number EPA–HQ– OPP–2007–1056. Publicly available docket materials are available either electronically at http:// www.regulations.gov, or, if only available in hard copy, at the OPP Regulatory Public Docket in Rm. S– 4400, One Potomac Yard (South Bldg.), 2777 S. Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA. The hours of operation of this Docket Facility is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays. The Docket Facility telephone number is (703) 305–5805. 2. Electronic access. You may access this Federal Register document electronically through the EPA Internet under the ‘‘Federal Register’’ listings at http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr. rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with NOTICES II. Background EPA has granted or denied emergency exemptions to the following State and Federal agencies. The emergency exemptions may take the following form: Crisis, public health, quarantine, or specific. EPA has also listed denied VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:22 Feb 28, 2008 Jkt 214001 emergency exemption requests in this notice. Under FIFRA section 18, EPA can authorize the use of a pesticide when emergency conditions exist. Authorizations (commonly called emergency exemptions) are granted to State and Federal agencies and are of four types: 1. A ‘‘specific exemption’’ authorizes use of a pesticide against specific pests on a limited acreage in a particular State. Most emergency exemptions are specific exemptions. 2. ‘‘Quarantine’’ and ‘‘public health’’ exemptions are a particular form of specific exemption issued for quarantine or public health purposes. These are rarely requested. 3. A ‘‘crisis exemption’’ is initiated by a State or Federal agency (and is confirmed by EPA) when there is insufficient time to request and obtain EPA permission for use of a pesticide in an emergency. EPA may deny an emergency exemption: If the State or Federal agency cannot demonstrate that an emergency exists, if the use poses unacceptable risks to the environment, or if EPA cannot reach a conclusion that the proposed pesticide use is likely to result in ‘‘a reasonable certainty of no harm’’ to human health, including exposure of residues of the pesticide to infants and children. If the emergency use of the pesticide on a food or feed commodity would result in pesticide chemical residues, EPA establishes a time-limited tolerance meeting the ‘‘reasonable certainty of no harm standard’’ of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA). In this document: EPA identifies the State or Federal agency granted the exemption or denial, the type of exemption, the pesticide authorized and the pests, the crop or use for which authorized, number of acres (if applicable), and the duration of the exemption. EPA also gives the Federal Register citation for the time-limited tolerance, if any. III. Emergency Exemptions and Denials A. U. S. States and Territories California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Pesticide Regulation Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of thiabendazole as a seed treatment on Brussels sprout, cabbage, and cauliflower to control black leg disease (Phoma lingam); November 17, 2007 to November 17, 2008. Contact: (Stacey Groce). EPA authorized the use of thiophanatemethyl on mushroom to control green PO 00000 Frm 00028 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 11115 mold; October 26, 2007 to October 26, 2008. Contact: (Andrea Conrath). Crisis: On November 29, 2007, for the use of boscalid and pyraclostrobin on Belgian endive to control Sclerotinia. This program is expected to end on January 31, 2008. Contact: (Stacey Groce). Colorado Department of Agriculture Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of clothianidin on beet, sugar beet, seed to control beet leafhopper (beet curly top virus); December 15, 2007 to September 30, 2008. Contact: (Stacey Groce). Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection Crisis: On December 18, 2007, for the use of chlorine dioxide on a contaminated building to inactive Bacillus anthracis spores. This program has ended. Contact: (Princess Campbell). Delaware Department of Agriculture Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of thiophanate-methyl on mushroom to control green mold; January 14, 2008 to January 14, 2009. Contact: (Andrea Conrath). Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of fludioxonil on carambola to control Dothiorella fruit rot; November 30, 2007 to November 30, 2008. Contact: (Andrea Conrath). Indiana Office of Indiana State Chemist Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of tebuconazole on corn, field, seed to control head smut; November 1, 2007 to May 31, 2008. Contact: (Andrew Ertman). Maryland Department of Agriculture Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of thiophanate-methyl on mushroom to control green mold; Effective January 14, 2008 to January 14, 2009. Contact: (Andrea Conrath). Minnesota Department of Agriculture Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of anthraquinone on corn, field, and sweet, seed to control sandhill crane; November 5, 2007 to July 30, 2008. Contact: (Marcel Howard). Oregon Department of Agriculture E:\FR\FM\29FEN1.SGM 29FEN1 11116 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 41 / Friday, February 29, 2008 / Notices Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of thiophanate-methyl on mushroom to control green mold; October 26, 2007 to October 26, 2008. Contact: (Andrea Conrath). EPA authorized the use of clothianidinin on beet, sugar, seed to control beet leafhopper (beet curly top virus); December 15, 2007 to September 30, 2008. Contact: (Stacey Groce). Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of thiophanate-methyl on mushroom to control green mold; Effective January 8, 2008 to January 8, 2009. Contact: (Andrea Conrath). Texas Department of Agriculture Crisis: On November 26, 2007, for the use of thiophanate-methyl on citrus to control postbloom fruit drop and stemend rot. A specific exemption request has been submitted to EPA for this use. This program is ongoing. Contact: (Andrea Conrath). Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of triflumizole on parsley; dandelion; swiss chard; collards; kale; kohlrabi; mustard greens; Chinese napa cabbage; coriander, leaves; broccoli; and turnip greens to control powdery mildew (Erysiphe spp.); November 2, 2007 to November 2, 2008. Contact: (Libby Pemberton). EPA authorized the use of formetanate hydrochloride on dry bulb onions to control thrips; December 28, 2007 to May 31, 2008. Contact: (Andrew Ertman). Washington Department of Agriculture Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of thiabendazole as a seed treatment on Brussels sprout, cabbage, and cauliflower to control blackleg disease (phoma lingam); November 17, 2007 to November 17, 2008. Contact: (Stacey Groce). Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of anthraquinone on corn, field, and sweet, seed to control sandhill crane; December 13, 2007 to July 30, 2008. Contact: (Marcel Howard). rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with NOTICES Wyoming Department of Agriculture Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of clothianidin on beet, sugar, seed to control beet leafhopper (beet curly top virus); December 13, 2007 to September 30, 2008. Contact: (Stacey Groce). VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:22 Feb 28, 2008 Jkt 214001 B. Federal Department and Agencies United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspector Service Quarantine: EPA authorized the use of E-11-tetradecen-1-yl acetate on all agricultural crops and all residential areas to control the light brown apple moth; October 5, 2007 to October 1, 2010. Contact: (Andrew Ertman). Quarantine: EPA authorized the use of bacillus thuringiensis on cotton to control the pink boll worm; October 31, 2007 to October 31, 2010. Contact: (Andrea Conrath). List of Subjects Environmental protection, Pesticides and pests. Dated: February 14, 2008. Donald R. Stubbs, Acting Director, Registration Division, Office of Pesticide Programs. Editorial Note: This notice did not appear in the issue of Wednesday, February 27, 2008. As a result, it is being printed in its entirety. [FR Doc. E8–3491 Filed 2–26–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560–50–S FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM Agency Information Collection Activities: Announcement of Board Approval Under Delegated Authority and Submission to OMB Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System SUMMARY: Background. Notice is hereby given of the final approval of proposed information collections by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Board) under OMB delegated authority, as per 5 CFR 1320.16 (OMB Regulations on Controlling Paperwork Burdens on the Public). Board– approved collections of information are incorporated into the official OMB inventory of currently approved collections of information. Copies of the Paperwork Reduction Act Submission, supporting statements and approved collection of information instruments are placed into OMB’s public docket files. The Federal Reserve may not conduct or sponsor, and the respondent is not required to respond to, an information collection that has been extended, revised, or implemented on or after October 1, 1995, unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Federal Reserve Board Clearance Officer ––Michelle Shore––Division of Research AGENCY: PO 00000 Frm 00029 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 and Statistics, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Washington, DC 20551 (202–452–3829). OMB Desk Officer––Alexander T. Hunt––Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, New Executive Office Building, Room 10235, Washington, DC 20503. Final approval under OMB delegated authority of the extension for three years, without revision, of the following reports: 1. Report titles: Registration Statement for Persons Who Extend Credit Secured by Margin Stock (Other Than Banks, Brokers, or Dealers); Deregistration Statement for Persons Registered Pursuant to Regulation U; Statement of Purpose for an Extension of Credit Secured by Margin Stock by a Person Subject to Registration Under Regulation U; Annual Report; Statement of Purpose for an Extension of Credit by a Creditor; and Statement of Purpose for an Extension of Credit Secured by Margin Stock Agency form numbers: FR G–1, FR G– 2, FR G–3, FR G–4, FR T–4, and FR U– 1 OMB control numbers: 7100–0011: FR G–1, FR G–2, and FR G–4; 7100–0018: FR G–3; 7100–0019: FR T–4; and 7100– 0115: FR U–1 Frequency: FR G–1, FR G–2, FR G–3, FR T–4, and FR U–1: on occasion FR G– 4: annual Reporters: Individuals and business Annual reporting hours: 1,366 reporting hours; 107,757 recordkeeping hours Estimated average hours per response: FR G–1: 2.5 hours; FR G–2: 15 minutes;FR G–3: 10 minutes; FR G–4: 2.0 hours; FR T–4: 10 minutes; and FR U–1: 10 minutes Number of respondents: FR G–1: 61; FR G–2: 36; FR G–3: 602; FR G–4: 602; FR T–4: 5,100; and FR U–1: 6,931 General description of report: These information collections are mandatory (15 U.S.C. §§ 78g). The information in the FR G–1 and FR G–4 is given confidential treatment under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. §§ 552(b)(4) and (6)). The FR G–2 does not contain confidential information. The FR G–3, FR T–4, and FR U–1 are not submitted to the Federal Reserve and, as such, no issue of confidentiality arises. Abstract: The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 authorizes the Federal Reserve to regulate securities credit extended by brokers and dealers, banks, and other lenders. The purpose statements, FR T– 4, FR U–1, and FR G–3, are recordkeeping requirements for brokers and dealers, banks, and other lenders, E:\FR\FM\29FEN1.SGM 29FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 41 (Friday, February 29, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 11114-11116]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-3491]


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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

[EPA-HQ-OPP-2007-1056; FRL-8350-5]


Pesticide Emergency Exemptions; Agency Decisions and State and 
Federal Agency Crisis Declarations

    Editorial Note: This notice did not appear in the issue of 
Wednesday, February 27, 2008. As a result, it is being printed in 
its entirety.
AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: EPA has granted or denied emergency exemptions under the 
Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) for use of 
pesticides as listed in this notice. The exemptions or denials were 
granted during the period October 1, 2007 through December 31, 2007 to 
control unforeseen pest outbreaks.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: See each emergency exemption or denial 
for the name of a contact person. The following information applies to 
all contact persons: Team Leader, Emergency Response Team, Registration 
Division (7505P), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental 
Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460-
0001; telephone number: (703) 308-9366.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

[[Page 11115]]

I. General Information

A. Does this Action Apply to Me?

    You may be potentially affected by this action if you are an 
agricultural producer, food manufacturer, or pesticide manufacturer. 
Potentially affected entities may include, but are not limited to:
     Crop production (NAICS code 111).
     Animal production (NAICS code 112).
     Food manufacturing (NAICS code 311).
     Pesticide manufacturing (NAICS code 32532).
    This listing is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather provides 
a guide for readers regarding entities likely to be affected by this 
action. Other types of entities not listed in this unit could also be 
affected. The North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) 
codes have been provided to assist you and others in determining 
whether this action might apply to certain entities. To determine 
whether you or your business may be affected by this action, you should 
carefully examine the applicability provisions discussed above. If you 
have any questions regarding the applicability of this action to a 
particular entity, consult the person listed under FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION CONTACT.

B. How Can I Get Copies of this Document and Other Related Information?

    1. Docket. EPA has established a docket for this action under 
docket identification (ID) number EPA-HQ-OPP-2007-1056. Publicly 
available docket materials are available either electronically at 
http://www.regulations.gov, or, if only available in hard copy, at the 
OPP Regulatory Public Docket in Rm. S-4400, One Potomac Yard (South 
Bldg.), 2777 S. Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA. The hours of operation of 
this Docket Facility is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, excluding legal holidays. The Docket Facility telephone number 
is (703) 305-5805.
    2. Electronic access. You may access this Federal Register document 
electronically through the EPA Internet under the ``Federal Register'' 
listings at http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr.

II. Background

    EPA has granted or denied emergency exemptions to the following 
State and Federal agencies. The emergency exemptions may take the 
following form: Crisis, public health, quarantine, or specific. EPA has 
also listed denied emergency exemption requests in this notice.
    Under FIFRA section 18, EPA can authorize the use of a pesticide 
when emergency conditions exist. Authorizations (commonly called 
emergency exemptions) are granted to State and Federal agencies and are 
of four types:
    1. A ``specific exemption'' authorizes use of a pesticide against 
specific pests on a limited acreage in a particular State. Most 
emergency exemptions are specific exemptions.
    2. ``Quarantine'' and ``public health'' exemptions are a particular 
form of specific exemption issued for quarantine or public health 
purposes. These are rarely requested.
    3. A ``crisis exemption'' is initiated by a State or Federal agency 
(and is confirmed by EPA) when there is insufficient time to request 
and obtain EPA permission for use of a pesticide in an emergency.
    EPA may deny an emergency exemption: If the State or Federal agency 
cannot demonstrate that an emergency exists, if the use poses 
unacceptable risks to the environment, or if EPA cannot reach a 
conclusion that the proposed pesticide use is likely to result in ``a 
reasonable certainty of no harm'' to human health, including exposure 
of residues of the pesticide to infants and children.
    If the emergency use of the pesticide on a food or feed commodity 
would result in pesticide chemical residues, EPA establishes a time-
limited tolerance meeting the ``reasonable certainty of no harm 
standard'' of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA).
    In this document: EPA identifies the State or Federal agency 
granted the exemption or denial, the type of exemption, the pesticide 
authorized and the pests, the crop or use for which authorized, number 
of acres (if applicable), and the duration of the exemption. EPA also 
gives the Federal Register citation for the time-limited tolerance, if 
any.

III. Emergency Exemptions and Denials

A. U. S. States and Territories

California

Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Pesticide Regulation
Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of thiabendazole as a seed 
treatment on Brussels sprout, cabbage, and cauliflower to control black 
leg disease (Phoma lingam); November 17, 2007 to November 17, 2008. 
Contact: (Stacey Groce).
EPA authorized the use of thiophanate-methyl on mushroom to control 
green mold; October 26, 2007 to October 26, 2008. Contact: (Andrea 
Conrath).
Crisis: On November 29, 2007, for the use of boscalid and 
pyraclostrobin on Belgian endive to control Sclerotinia. This program 
is expected to end on January 31, 2008. Contact: (Stacey Groce).

Colorado

Department of Agriculture
Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of clothianidin on beet, 
sugar beet, seed to control beet leafhopper (beet curly top virus); 
December 15, 2007 to September 30, 2008. Contact: (Stacey Groce).

Connecticut

Department of Environmental Protection
Crisis: On December 18, 2007, for the use of chlorine dioxide on a 
contaminated building to inactive Bacillus anthracis spores. This 
program has ended. Contact: (Princess Campbell).

Delaware

Department of Agriculture
Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of thiophanate-methyl on 
mushroom to control green mold; January 14, 2008 to January 14, 2009. 
Contact: (Andrea Conrath).

Florida

Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of fludioxonil on carambola 
to control Dothiorella fruit rot; November 30, 2007 to November 30, 
2008. Contact: (Andrea Conrath).

Indiana

Office of Indiana State Chemist
Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of tebuconazole on corn, 
field, seed to control head smut; November 1, 2007 to May 31, 2008. 
Contact: (Andrew Ertman).

Maryland

Department of Agriculture
Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of thiophanate-methyl on 
mushroom to control green mold; Effective January 14, 2008 to January 
14, 2009. Contact: (Andrea Conrath).

Minnesota

Department of Agriculture
Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of anthraquinone on corn, 
field, and sweet, seed to control sandhill crane; November 5, 2007 to 
July 30, 2008. Contact: (Marcel Howard).

Oregon

Department of Agriculture

[[Page 11116]]

Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of thiophanate-methyl on 
mushroom to control green mold; October 26, 2007 to October 26, 2008. 
Contact: (Andrea Conrath).
EPA authorized the use of clothianidinin on beet, sugar, seed to 
control beet leafhopper (beet curly top virus); December 15, 2007 to 
September 30, 2008. Contact: (Stacey Groce).

Pennsylvania

Department of Agriculture
Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of thiophanate-methyl on 
mushroom to control green mold; Effective January 8, 2008 to January 8, 
2009. Contact: (Andrea Conrath).

Texas

Department of Agriculture
Crisis: On November 26, 2007, for the use of thiophanate-methyl on 
citrus to control postbloom fruit drop and stem-end rot. A specific 
exemption request has been submitted to EPA for this use. This program 
is ongoing. Contact: (Andrea Conrath).
Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of triflumizole on parsley; 
dandelion; swiss chard; collards; kale; kohlrabi; mustard greens; 
Chinese napa cabbage; coriander, leaves; broccoli; and turnip greens to 
control powdery mildew (Erysiphe spp.); November 2, 2007 to November 2, 
2008. Contact: (Libby Pemberton).
EPA authorized the use of formetanate hydrochloride on dry bulb onions 
to control thrips; December 28, 2007 to May 31, 2008. Contact: (Andrew 
Ertman).

Washington

Department of Agriculture
Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of thiabendazole as a seed 
treatment on Brussels sprout, cabbage, and cauliflower to control 
blackleg disease (phoma lingam); November 17, 2007 to November 17, 
2008. Contact: (Stacey Groce).

Wisconsin

Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection
Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of anthraquinone on corn, 
field, and sweet, seed to control sandhill crane; December 13, 2007 to 
July 30, 2008. Contact: (Marcel Howard).

Wyoming

Department of Agriculture
Specific Exemption: EPA authorized the use of clothianidin on beet, 
sugar, seed to control beet leafhopper (beet curly top virus); December 
13, 2007 to September 30, 2008. Contact: (Stacey Groce).

B. Federal Department and Agencies

United States Department of Agriculture
Animal and Plant Health Inspector Service
Quarantine: EPA authorized the use of E-11-tetradecen-1-yl acetate on 
all agricultural crops and all residential areas to control the light 
brown apple moth; October 5, 2007 to October 1, 2010. Contact: (Andrew 
Ertman).
Quarantine: EPA authorized the use of bacillus thuringiensis on cotton 
to control the pink boll worm; October 31, 2007 to October 31, 2010. 
Contact: (Andrea Conrath).

List of Subjects

    Environmental protection, Pesticides and pests.

    Dated: February 14, 2008.
Donald R. Stubbs,
Acting Director, Registration Division, Office of Pesticide Programs.

    Editorial Note: This notice did not appear in the issue of 
Wednesday, February 27, 2008. As a result, it is being printed in 
its entirety.
[FR Doc. E8-3491 Filed 2-26-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6560-50-S