Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO, 8357-8358 [E8-2576]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 30 / Wednesday, February 13, 2008 / Notices River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Arizona State Museum is responsible for notifying the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River PimaMaricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published. Dated: December 19, 2007. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–2572 Filed 2–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Arapahoe and Weld Counties, CO. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Denver Museum of Nature & Science professional staff in consultation with the Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming; Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma; Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River Reservation, South Dakota; Comanche Nation of Oklahoma; VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:45 Feb 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana; Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah (Cedar City Band of Paiutes, Kanosh Band of Paiutes, Koosharem Band of Paiutes, Indian Peaks Band of Paiutes, and Shivwits Band of Paiutes); Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North & South Dakota; and Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah. In 1972, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from a construction site on private land in Aurora, Arapahoe County, CO, by the County Coroner for the Department of Health and Hospitals and turned over to the museum (DMNS catalogue numbers A786.1–9). No known individual was identified. The 12 associated funerary objects are 6 vials of white and light blue Italian glass pony beads (including one soil sample with beads intermixed); strands of an animal’s hair; fragments of 1 metal belt buckle; and 4 sets of fragments of textiles, probably wool. Osteological characteristics indicate that the individual is Native American. During the first half of the 19th century the larger Italian glass seed beads were widely traded from the Upper Missouri River Valley south into the Great Plains and were used by Indian tribes of the Colorado High Plains. The textile fragments are a basic twill and plain weave in simple stripe patterns using hand spun yarns. Analysis suggests that the textiles could have originated from any of the Navajo, Pueblo, or Spanish American weaving areas of the Southwest. Textiles from these areas were commonly traded to the Plains Indians throughout the 19th century. On the basis of the funerary objects associated with the human remains, the estimated date of the burial is between A.D. 1800 and 1860. In 1939, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from a construction site two miles west of Johnston, Weld County, CO, by unknown parties associated with the Works Progress Administration. Later that same year, Forest L. Powers of the Works Progress Administration PO 00000 Frm 00095 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 8357 donated the human remains to the museum (DMNS catalogue numbers A53.1–15). No known individuals were identified. The 19 associated funerary objects are 2 fragments of copper wire; 1 fragment of a wooden bow; 1 catlinite pipe bowl fragment; 1 leather clothing fragment with blue pony beads; rusted fragments of 1 metal animal trap; 1 rusted commercial coffee grinder; 1 leather belt, in pieces; 1 leather bag, in fragments, with possible human ribs embedded; 4 woodpecker beaks; 2 bird bones; 1 belt buckle; 1 leather sheath; fragments of 1 leather strap; and fragments of 1 piece of cloth. Osteological characteristics indicate that the individuals are Native American. Copper stains near the mastoid processes of one individual suggest that the individual wore copper ear ornaments, which supports Native American identification for the human remains. The associated funerary objects are consistent with possible belongings of Indian people of Colorado during the mid–1800s. The items include traditional items of Native gathering, construction, and use, as well as EuroAmerican trade items. Catlinite pipes were widely traded from the Minnesota mine source to tribes throughout the Great Plains. The Euro-American artifacts date from the mid–19th century. On the basis of the funerary objects associated with the human remains, the estimated date of the burials is between A.D. 1840 and 1870. A 2001 map published by the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs, The Estimated Tribal Territories in Colorado during the Late Nineteenth Century, shows that the two locations from which the human remains were removed were within the historic territories of the Arapaho, Cheyenne, Jicarilla Apache, Kiowa, Lakota (Sioux), and Pawnee peoples. Consultation with the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado and Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah established that the Ute tribes also used the area from which the human remains were removed. Historic records and statements from members of the consulted tribes further corroborate the presence of Arapaho, Cheyenne, Jicarilla Apache, Kiowa, Lakota (Sioux), Pawnee peoples, in or near the area during the Protohistoric and Historic periods. Documentary evidence suggests Iowa, Ottawa, and Paiute peoples in or near the area during the Protohistoric and Historic periods. Descendants of the Arapaho, Cheyenne, Jicarilla Apache, Iowa, Lakota, Ottawa, Paiute, Pawnee, and Ute are members of the Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, E:\FR\FM\13FEN1.SGM 13FEN1 rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with NOTICES 8358 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 30 / Wednesday, February 13, 2008 / Notices Wyoming; Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma; Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River Reservation, South Dakota; Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana; Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah; Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North & South Dakota; and Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah. Officials of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of three individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of Denver Museum of Nature & Science also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 31 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science officials have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming; CheyenneArapaho Tribes of Oklahoma; Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River Reservation, South Dakota; Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana; Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah; Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North & VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:45 Feb 12, 2008 Jkt 214001 South Dakota; and Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Dr. Chip ColwellChanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Boulevard, Denver, CO 80205, telephone (303) 370–6378, before March 14, 2008. Repatriation to the Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming; Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma; Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River Reservation, South Dakota; Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana; Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah; Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North & South Dakota; and Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Denver Museum of Nature & Science is responsible for notifying the Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming; CheyenneArapaho Tribes of Oklahoma; Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River Reservation, South Dakota; Comanche Nation of Oklahoma; Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana; Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah; Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North & South Dakota; and Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah that this notice has been published. PO 00000 Frm 00096 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Dated: January 9, 2008. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–2576 Filed 2–12–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo, HI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Department of Anthropology, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo, HI. The human remains were removed from Hawaii Island, HI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Hawaii at Hilo professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Big Island Burial Council, Department of Hawaiian Homelands, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawaii Nei, and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. In August 1980, human remains were removed from Kahalu’u Habitation Cave (site 50–10–37–7702) and a small adjacent lava tube (site 50–10–37–5611) in Kahalu’u, North Kona, HI, by the University of Hawaii at Hilo and Paul H. Rosendahl, Inc., during excavations for the West Hawaii Housing Foundation, as mitigation prior to a federal housing development. Human remains discovered at the time were determined to be prehistoric and reburied. Midden deposits from both sites are in the possession of the University of Hawaii at Hilo. During the NAGPRA inventory process, additional human remains representing a minimum of three individuals from 50–10–37–7702 and one individual from 50–10–37–5611 were discovered in the midden deposits. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. E:\FR\FM\13FEN1.SGM 13FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 30 (Wednesday, February 13, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 8357-8358]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-2576]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & 
Science, Denver, CO

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the control of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 
Denver, CO. The human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed from Arapahoe and Weld Counties, CO.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Denver 
Museum of Nature & Science professional staff in consultation with the 
Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming; Cheyenne-Arapaho 
Tribes of Oklahoma; Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River 
Reservation, South Dakota; Comanche Nation of Oklahoma; Iowa Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Kiowa Indian Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian 
Reservation, Montana; Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, 
South Dakota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah 
(Cedar City Band of Paiutes, Kanosh Band of Paiutes, Koosharem Band of 
Paiutes, Indian Peaks Band of Paiutes, and Shivwits Band of Paiutes); 
Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud Indian 
Reservation, South Dakota; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; 
Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, 
Oklahoma; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, 
Colorado; Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North & South Dakota; and Ute 
Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & 
Utah.
    In 1972, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were removed from a construction site on private land in Aurora, 
Arapahoe County, CO, by the County Coroner for the Department of Health 
and Hospitals and turned over to the museum (DMNS catalogue numbers 
A786.1-9). No known individual was identified. The 12 associated 
funerary objects are 6 vials of white and light blue Italian glass pony 
beads (including one soil sample with beads intermixed); strands of an 
animal's hair; fragments of 1 metal belt buckle; and 4 sets of 
fragments of textiles, probably wool.
    Osteological characteristics indicate that the individual is Native 
American. During the first half of the 19th century the larger Italian 
glass seed beads were widely traded from the Upper Missouri River 
Valley south into the Great Plains and were used by Indian tribes of 
the Colorado High Plains. The textile fragments are a basic twill and 
plain weave in simple stripe patterns using hand spun yarns. Analysis 
suggests that the textiles could have originated from any of the 
Navajo, Pueblo, or Spanish American weaving areas of the Southwest. 
Textiles from these areas were commonly traded to the Plains Indians 
throughout the 19th century. On the basis of the funerary objects 
associated with the human remains, the estimated date of the burial is 
between A.D. 1800 and 1860.
    In 1939, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were removed from a construction site two miles west of Johnston, Weld 
County, CO, by unknown parties associated with the Works Progress 
Administration. Later that same year, Forest L. Powers of the Works 
Progress Administration donated the human remains to the museum (DMNS 
catalogue numbers A53.1-15). No known individuals were identified. The 
19 associated funerary objects are 2 fragments of copper wire; 1 
fragment of a wooden bow; 1 catlinite pipe bowl fragment; 1 leather 
clothing fragment with blue pony beads; rusted fragments of 1 metal 
animal trap; 1 rusted commercial coffee grinder; 1 leather belt, in 
pieces; 1 leather bag, in fragments, with possible human ribs embedded; 
4 woodpecker beaks; 2 bird bones; 1 belt buckle; 1 leather sheath; 
fragments of 1 leather strap; and fragments of 1 piece of cloth.
    Osteological characteristics indicate that the individuals are 
Native American. Copper stains near the mastoid processes of one 
individual suggest that the individual wore copper ear ornaments, which 
supports Native American identification for the human remains. The 
associated funerary objects are consistent with possible belongings of 
Indian people of Colorado during the mid-1800s. The items include 
traditional items of Native gathering, construction, and use, as well 
as Euro-American trade items. Catlinite pipes were widely traded from 
the Minnesota mine source to tribes throughout the Great Plains. The 
Euro-American artifacts date from the mid-19th century. On the basis of 
the funerary objects associated with the human remains, the estimated 
date of the burials is between A.D. 1840 and 1870.
    A 2001 map published by the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs, 
The Estimated Tribal Territories in Colorado during the Late Nineteenth 
Century, shows that the two locations from which the human remains were 
removed were within the historic territories of the Arapaho, Cheyenne, 
Jicarilla Apache, Kiowa, Lakota (Sioux), and Pawnee peoples. 
Consultation with the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute 
Reservation, Colorado and Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain 
Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah established that the Ute 
tribes also used the area from which the human remains were removed. 
Historic records and statements from members of the consulted tribes 
further corroborate the presence of Arapaho, Cheyenne, Jicarilla 
Apache, Kiowa, Lakota (Sioux), Pawnee peoples, in or near the area 
during the Protohistoric and Historic periods. Documentary evidence 
suggests Iowa, Ottawa, and Paiute peoples in or near the area during 
the Protohistoric and Historic periods. Descendants of the Arapaho, 
Cheyenne, Jicarilla Apache, Iowa, Lakota, Ottawa, Paiute, Pawnee, and 
Ute are members of the Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River Reservation,

[[Page 8358]]

Wyoming; Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma; Cheyenne River Sioux 
Tribe of the Cheyenne River Reservation, South Dakota; Iowa Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Kiowa Indian Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian 
Reservation, Montana; Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, 
South Dakota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah; 
Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud Indian 
Reservation, South Dakota; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; 
Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, 
Oklahoma; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, 
Colorado; Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North & South Dakota; and Ute 
Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & 
Utah.
    Officials of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of three individuals of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of Denver Museum of Nature & Science also 
have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 31 objects 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Denver Museum of 
Nature & Science officials have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 
3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be 
reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary objects and the Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River 
Reservation, Wyoming; Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma; Cheyenne 
River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River Reservation, South Dakota; Iowa 
Tribe of Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Kiowa Indian 
Tribe of Oklahoma; Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne 
Indian Reservation, Montana; Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge 
Reservation, South Dakota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Paiute Indian 
Tribe of Utah; Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the 
Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota; Sac & Fox Tribe of the 
Mississippi in Iowa; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and 
Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the 
Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North 
& South Dakota; and Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, 
Colorado, New Mexico & Utah.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Dr. Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of 
Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Boulevard, Denver, CO 80205, telephone 
(303) 370-6378, before March 14, 2008. Repatriation to the Arapahoe 
Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming; Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes 
of Oklahoma; Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne River 
Reservation, South Dakota; Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache 
Nation, New Mexico; Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; Northern Cheyenne 
Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana; Oglala 
Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota; Ottawa Tribe 
of Oklahoma; Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah; Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; 
Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota; 
Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; Sac & Fox Nation of 
Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Southern 
Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Standing 
Rock Sioux Tribe of North & South Dakota; and Ute Mountain Tribe of the 
Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah may proceed after 
that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Denver Museum of Nature & Science is responsible for notifying 
the Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming; Cheyenne-
Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma; Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe of the Cheyenne 
River Reservation, South Dakota; Comanche Nation of Oklahoma; Iowa 
Tribe of Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Kiowa Indian 
Tribe of Oklahoma; Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne 
Indian Reservation, Montana; Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge 
Reservation, South Dakota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Paiute Indian 
Tribe of Utah; Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma; Rosebud Sioux Tribe of the 
Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota; Sac & Fox Tribe of the 
Mississippi in Iowa; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and 
Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the 
Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North 
& South Dakota; and Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, 
Colorado, New Mexico & Utah that this notice has been published.

    Dated: January 9, 2008.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-2576 Filed 2-12-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S