Notice of Inventory Completion: Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL and Southwest Florida Water Management District, Brooksville, FL, 3995-3996 [E8-1078]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 15 / Wednesday, January 23, 2008 / Notices with the public land management in the Carrizo Plain National Monument in Central California. At this meeting, Monument staff will present updated information on the progress on the draft Carrizo Plain National Monument Resource Management Plan and the Environmental Impact Statement (RMP/ EIS). A preliminary preferred alternative being developed by the Carrizo Managing Partners—BLM, the California Department of Fish and Game and the Nature Conservancy—will be the focus of this meeting. This meeting is open to the public. Depending on the number of persons wishing to comment, and the time available, the time allotted for individual oral comments may be limited. Individuals who plan to attend and need special assistance such as sign language interpretation or other reasonable accommodations should contact BLM as indicated below. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bureau of Land Management, Attention: Johna Hurl, Monument Manager, 3801 Pegasus Drive, Bakersfield, CA, 93308. Phone at (661) 391–6093 or e-mail: jhurl@blm.gov. Dated: January 16, 2007. Johna Hurl, Monument Manager, Carrizo Plain National Monument. [FR Doc. E8–1062 Filed 1–22–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–40–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL and Southwest Florida Water Management District, Brooksville, FL National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ebenthall on PROD1PC69 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of the Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, and in the physical custody of the Southwest Florida Water Management District, Brooksville, FL. The human remains were removed from Tatham Mound, Citrus County, FL. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:17 Jan 22, 2008 Jkt 214001 agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Florida Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida, Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, and Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations). In 1986–1987, human remains representing a minimum of 366 individuals were removed from Tatham Mound (8CI203) in Citrus County, FL, as part of a Florida Museum of Natural History research project. No known individuals are identified. No associated funerary objects are included in this notice. Tatham Mound (8CI203) is a Safety Harbor culture mound. Tatham Mound consists of an earlier, pre-Columbian lower mound that contained human remains that are radiocarbon-dated to circa A.D. 1050. An upper mound contained the human remains of some of the individuals, most of whom were bundle burials in an extremely poor state of preservation. At the time of the Hernando de Soto expedition into the region in 1539, people associated with variants of the Safety Harbor culture lived from north Sarasota County to the Cove of the Withlachoochee, extending inland in Citrus County as far as Tatham Mound itself. Narratives associated with the de Soto expedition record the names of two Native American towns called Vicela and Tocaste in the vicinity of the Cove (but not in the locality of Tatham Mound). The Native American town of Vicela is thought to have been near the modern town of Istachatta in northeast Hernando County, approximately 15 miles southwest of Tatham Mound. No archeological site corresponding to Vicela has been found. North of Vicela, the de Soto expedition accounts mention the Native American town of Tocaste, describing it as being on a large lake. After 1539, Vicela and Tocaste disappear from the historical records. The linguistic affiliation of the Tatham Mound people and their Safety Harbor relatives are unknown. No information on their language, other than a few proper names noted in colonial Spanish documents, exists. Archeological and historical research in Citrus County, which is in the Florida Central Gulf Coast region (including Greater Tampa Bay) has shown that the Safety Harbor culture dates to the period circa A.D. 1000–1650. There is no known relationship between the Safety Harbor people and any modern Native PO 00000 Frm 00075 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 3995 American group. Consequently, the human remains are culturally unidentifiable. At the time of excavation, the Tatham Mound site (formerly known as the McGregor–Smith tract) was owned by the South Florida Council of the Boy Scouts of America. Acting on the advice of the Council’s Native American Advisory Committee, the Council mandated that the human remains be reinterred in the mound at the conclusion of reasonable scientific analysis, and that such reinterment would be in accordance with State of Florida regulations. The analysis of the human remains was carried out at first at East Carolina University and then at the University of North Carolina where analysis was completed. Subsequently, the human remains were transferred to the Southwest Florida Water Management District for storage. In late 2004, the South Florida Council of the Boy Scouts of America sold the land on which Tatham Mound is located to the Southwest Florida Water Management District, a State of Florida agency. The site is now joined with the Flying Eagle tract. Ownership of the land by Southwest Florida Water Management District affords legal protection for Tatham Mound and places the stewardship of the site under the Florida Division of Historical Resources. Officials of the Florida Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 366 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Florida Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), a relationship of shared group relationship cannot reasonably be traced between the Native American human remains and any present–day Indian tribe. The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee (Review Committee) is responsible for recommending specific actions for disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains. In February 2007, the Florida Museum of Natural History requested that the Review Committee recommend reburial of the human remains of 366 culturally unidentifiable individuals at the Tatham Mound site. The Review Committee considered the request at its April 2007 meeting and recommended the reburial of the culturally unidentifiable human remains. In May 2007, a letter from the Designated Federal Official, writing on behalf of the Secretary of the Interior, recommended reburial of the physical E:\FR\FM\23JAN1.SGM 23JAN1 3996 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 15 / Wednesday, January 23, 2008 / Notices remains of the 366 culturally unidentifiable individuals contingent on the consent of the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida, Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, and Seminole Tribe of Florida; publication of a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register; and in accordance with applicable laws. This notice fulfills the requirement of publication. The Florida Museum of Natural History also has received consent from the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida, Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, and Seminole Tribe of Florida. Artifacts removed from the mound are not being reburied. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Jerald T. Milanich, Florida Museum of Natural History, Campus PO Box 117800, Gainesville, FL 32611–7800, telephone (352) 378–0990, before February 22, 2008. Reburial of the human remains, with the consent of the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida, Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, and Seminole Tribe of Florida may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Florida Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida, Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, and Seminole Tribe of Florida that this notice has been published. Dated: November 26, 2007 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–1078 Filed 1–22–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest, Silver City, NM and Southwest Museum of the American Indian, Autry National Center, Los Angeles, CA; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. AGENCY: ebenthall on PROD1PC69 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest, Silver City, NM and in the possession of the Southwest Museum of the American Indian, Autry National Center, Los Angeles, CA. The VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:17 Jan 22, 2008 Jkt 214001 human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Tularosa Cave, Catron County, NM. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. This notice supersedes the Notice of Inventory Completion previously published in the Federal Register of October 31, 2007 (FR Doc. E7–21379, pages 61674–61675). This notice corrects the controller of the human remains and associated funerary objects, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2(a)(3)(ii), as review of the field records and maps associated with the excavation of the site, indicates that the Tularosa Cave is located on Federal lands that are administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest, Silver City, NM. Therefore, the Southwest Museum of American Indian does not have control of the human remains and associated funerary objects. This notice also corrects the consulted tribes and the cultural affiliation of the human remains and associated funerary objects from what had previously been published by the Southwest Museum of the American Indian. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest professional staff in consultation with the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. In 1905, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Tularosa Cave in Catron County, NM, by Mr. Peter Goddard Gates (P.G. Gates) as part of the Museum-Gates Expedition, a collaborative excavation funded by the United States National Museum, now the Smithsonian Institution, and amateur archeologist, Mr. Gates. On an unknown date, Mr. Gates transferred the human remains into the possession of the California Institute of Technology as part of the larger P.G. Gates Collection. In 1946, the California Institute of Technology loaned the P.G. Gates Collection to the Southwest Museum of the American Indian. In 2006, the California Institute of Technology transferred possession of the P.G. Gates Collection to the Southwest Museum of the American Indian. No known PO 00000 Frm 00076 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 individual was identified. The four associated funerary objects are one olivella shell bracelet, two mats made of rush, and one fragment of a woven textile of unknown use. Archeological evidence of both material culture and geographic settlement patterns indicate that Tularosa Cave is an Upland Mogollon site that was inhabited between 300 A.D. - 1300 A.D. Abandonment of nearly all Mogollon homeland sites before the protohistoric period suggests a possible population migration into neighboring Puebloan territory. The territory of the Upland Mogollon stretched from southcentral Arizona to south–central New Mexico. The Upland Mogollon territories are claimed, currently inhabited, or used by the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Villages had pithouses or pueblo-style houses. Most archeological evidence linking Upland Mogollon to present–day tribes rely on ceramics, which suggest the early establishment of brownware producing groups. Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization, the Tularosa Cave has been identified as rock shelter occupied between A.D. 500–1300. Present–day descendents of the Upland Mogollon are the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation. Oral traditions presented by representatives of the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico support cultural affiliation. Officials of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila River National Forest have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila River National Forest also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the four objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila River National Forest have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. E:\FR\FM\23JAN1.SGM 23JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 15 (Wednesday, January 23, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 3995-3996]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-1078]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Florida Museum of Natural 
History, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL and Southwest Florida 
Water Management District, Brooksville, FL

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of the 
Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, 
FL, and in the physical custody of the Southwest Florida Water 
Management District, Brooksville, FL. The human remains were removed 
from Tatham Mound, Citrus County, FL.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Florida 
Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida, Seminole 
Nation of Oklahoma, and Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, 
Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations).
    In 1986-1987, human remains representing a minimum of 366 
individuals were removed from Tatham Mound (8CI203) in Citrus County, 
FL, as part of a Florida Museum of Natural History research project. No 
known individuals are identified. No associated funerary objects are 
included in this notice.
    Tatham Mound (8CI203) is a Safety Harbor culture mound. Tatham 
Mound consists of an earlier, pre-Columbian lower mound that contained 
human remains that are radiocarbon-dated to circa A.D. 1050. An upper 
mound contained the human remains of some of the individuals, most of 
whom were bundle burials in an extremely poor state of preservation. At 
the time of the Hernando de Soto expedition into the region in 1539, 
people associated with variants of the Safety Harbor culture lived from 
north Sarasota County to the Cove of the Withlachoochee, extending 
inland in Citrus County as far as Tatham Mound itself. Narratives 
associated with the de Soto expedition record the names of two Native 
American towns called Vicela and Tocaste in the vicinity of the Cove 
(but not in the locality of Tatham Mound). The Native American town of 
Vicela is thought to have been near the modern town of Istachatta in 
northeast Hernando County, approximately 15 miles southwest of Tatham 
Mound. No archeological site corresponding to Vicela has been found. 
North of Vicela, the de Soto expedition accounts mention the Native 
American town of Tocaste, describing it as being on a large lake. After 
1539, Vicela and Tocaste disappear from the historical records. The 
linguistic affiliation of the Tatham Mound people and their Safety 
Harbor relatives are unknown. No information on their language, other 
than a few proper names noted in colonial Spanish documents, exists. 
Archeological and historical research in Citrus County, which is in the 
Florida Central Gulf Coast region (including Greater Tampa Bay) has 
shown that the Safety Harbor culture dates to the period circa A.D. 
1000-1650. There is no known relationship between the Safety Harbor 
people and any modern Native American group. Consequently, the human 
remains are culturally unidentifiable.
    At the time of excavation, the Tatham Mound site (formerly known as 
the McGregor-Smith tract) was owned by the South Florida Council of the 
Boy Scouts of America. Acting on the advice of the Council's Native 
American Advisory Committee, the Council mandated that the human 
remains be reinterred in the mound at the conclusion of reasonable 
scientific analysis, and that such reinterment would be in accordance 
with State of Florida regulations. The analysis of the human remains 
was carried out at first at East Carolina University and then at the 
University of North Carolina where analysis was completed. 
Subsequently, the human remains were transferred to the Southwest 
Florida Water Management District for storage.
    In late 2004, the South Florida Council of the Boy Scouts of 
America sold the land on which Tatham Mound is located to the Southwest 
Florida Water Management District, a State of Florida agency. The site 
is now joined with the Flying Eagle tract. Ownership of the land by 
Southwest Florida Water Management District affords legal protection 
for Tatham Mound and places the stewardship of the site under the 
Florida Division of Historical Resources.
    Officials of the Florida Museum of Natural History have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of 366 individuals of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the Florida Museum of Natural History 
also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), a 
relationship of shared group relationship cannot reasonably be traced 
between the Native American human remains and any present-day Indian 
tribe.
    The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review 
Committee (Review Committee) is responsible for recommending specific 
actions for disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains. In 
February 2007, the Florida Museum of Natural History requested that the 
Review Committee recommend reburial of the human remains of 366 
culturally unidentifiable individuals at the Tatham Mound site. The 
Review Committee considered the request at its April 2007 meeting and 
recommended the reburial of the culturally unidentifiable human 
remains. In May 2007, a letter from the Designated Federal Official, 
writing on behalf of the Secretary of the Interior, recommended 
reburial of the physical

[[Page 3996]]

remains of the 366 culturally unidentifiable individuals contingent on 
the consent of the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida, Seminole 
Nation of Oklahoma, and Seminole Tribe of Florida; publication of a 
Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register; and in 
accordance with applicable laws. This notice fulfills the requirement 
of publication. The Florida Museum of Natural History also has received 
consent from the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida, Seminole 
Nation of Oklahoma, and Seminole Tribe of Florida. Artifacts removed 
from the mound are not being reburied.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Jerald 
T. Milanich, Florida Museum of Natural History, Campus PO Box 117800, 
Gainesville, FL 32611-7800, telephone (352) 378-0990, before February 
22, 2008. Reburial of the human remains, with the consent of the 
Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida, Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, 
and Seminole Tribe of Florida may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    Florida Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the 
Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida, Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, 
and Seminole Tribe of Florida that this notice has been published.

    Dated: November 26, 2007
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-1078 Filed 1-22-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S