Oral Declarations No Longer Satisfactory as Evidence of Citizenship and Identity, 72744-72745 [E7-24691]

Download as PDF 72744 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 245 / Friday, December 21, 2007 / Notices hewesj@mail.nih.gov or (301) 496–0477 for more information. Dated: December 14, 2007. Steven M. Ferguson, Director, Division of Technology Development and Transfer, Office of Technology Transfer, National Institutes of Health. [FR Doc. E7–24784 Filed 12–20–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4140–01–P of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Proposed Project: Emergency Response Grants Regulations—42 CFR part 51— (OMB No. 0930–0229)—Extension DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request In compliance with section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 concerning opportunity for public comment on proposed collections of information, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects. To request more information on the proposed projects or to obtain a copy of the information collection plans, call the SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer on (240) 276– 1243. Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collections of information are necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate This rule implements section 501(m) of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C 290aa), which authorizes the Secretary to make noncompetitive grants, contracts or cooperative agreements to public entities to enable such entities to address emergency substance abuse or mental health needs in local communities. The rule establishes criteria for determining that a substance abuse or mental health emergency exists, the minimum content for an application, and reporting requirements for recipients of such funding. SAMHSA will use the information in the applications to make a determination that the requisite need exists; that the mental health and/or substance abuse needs are a direct result of the precipitating event; that no other local, state, tribal or Federal funding sources available to address the need; that there is an adequate plan of services; that the applicant has appropriate organizational capability; and, that the budget provides sufficient justification and is consistent with the documentation of need and the plan of Responses per respondent Number of respondents 42 CFR citation services. Eligible applicants may apply to the Secretary for either of two types of substance abuse and mental health emergency response grants: Immediate awards and Intermediate awards. The former are designed to be funded up to $50,000, or such greater amount as determined by the Secretary on a caseby-case basis, and are to be used over the initial 90-day period commencing as soon as possible after the precipitating event; the latter awards require more documentation, including a needs assessment, other data and related budgetary detail. The Intermediate awards have no predefined budget limit. Typically, Intermediate awards would be used to meet systemic mental health and/or substance abuse needs during the recovery period following the Immediate award period. Such awards may be used for up to one year, with a possible second year supplement based on submission of additional required information and data. This program is an approved user of the PHS–5161 application form, approved by OMB under control number 0920–0428. The quarterly financial status reports in 51d.10(a)(2) and (b)(2) are as permitted by 45 CFR 92.41(b); the final program report, financial status report and final voucher in 51d.10(a)(3) and in 51d.10(b)(3–4) are in accordance with 45 CFR 92.50(b). Information collection requirements of 45 CFR part 92 are approved by OMB under control number 0990–0169. The following table presents annual burden estimates for the information collection requirements of this regulation. Hours per response Annual burden hours Immediate award application: 51d.4(a) and 51d.6(a)(2) .......................................................................... 51d.4(b) and 51d.6(a)(2) Immediate Awards ........................................... 51d.10(a)(1)—Immediate awards—mid-program report if applicable ...... Final report content for both types of awards: 51d.10(c) ................................................................................................... 3 3 3 1 1 1 3 10 2 *9 *30 *6 6 1 3 18 Total ................................................................................................... 6 ........................ ........................ 18 mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES * This burden is carried under OMB No. 0920–0428. Send comments to Summer King, SAMHSA Reports Clearance Officer, Room 7–1044, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857 AND e-mail her a copy at summer.king@samhsa.hhs.gov. Written comments should be received within 60 days of this notice. Dated: December 13, 2007. Elaine Parry, Acting Director, Office of Program Services. [FR Doc. E7–24824 Filed 12–20–07; 8:45 am] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Bureau of Customs and Border Protection BILLING CODE 4162–20–P Oral Declarations No Longer Satisfactory as Evidence of Citizenship and Identity U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. AGENCIES: VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:54 Dec 20, 2007 Jkt 214001 PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\21DEN1.SGM 21DEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 245 / Friday, December 21, 2007 / Notices ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: U.S., Canadian and Bermudian citizens entering the United States at land or sea ports-of-entry must establish their identity and citizenship to the satisfaction of a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officer. Under current CBP procedures, such individuals may provide any proof of identity and citizenship. While most individuals provide documentary evidence of citizenship, such as a passport or birth certificate, individuals may, depending on the circumstances, be admitted on an oral declaration. Accordingly, CBP is amending its field guidance procedures to instruct CBP officers that citizenship ordinarily may not be established using only an oral declaration. This Notice informs the public that, effective January 31, 2008, all travelers will be expected to present documents proving citizenship, such as a birth certificate, and government-issued documents proving identity, such as a driver’s license, when entering the United States through land and sea ports of entry. DATES: This notice is effective January 31, 2008. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Colleen Manaher, WHTI, Office of Field Operations, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Room 5.4–D, Washington, DC 20229, telephone number (202) 344– 3003. All travelers entering the United States are inspected by a Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officer. To enter the United States in conformance with the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), U.S. citizens, Canadians and Bermudians must satisfy the CBP Officer of their identity and citizenship. See 8 CFR 235.1(b) and 235.1(f)(1). In accordance with current CBP operational procedures, a CBP Officer may accept documentary evidence of citizenship from U.S. citizens arriving at land or sea ports of entry from within the Western Hemisphere, such as a passport or birth certificate, or may accept an oral declaration if, depending upon the circumstances presented, such a declaration is deemed sufficient to prove citizenship. When assessing an assertion of citizenship, the CBP Officer may ask for additional identification and proof of citizenship until the CBP Officer is satisfied that the traveler seeking entry into the United States is a U.S. citizen. Similarly, certain nonimmigrant aliens who are citizens of Canada and mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:37 Dec 20, 2007 Jkt 214001 Bermuda are exempt from presenting a passport when entering the United States as nonimmigrant visitors from countries in the Western Hemisphere at land or sea ports-of-entry. 8 CFR 212.1(a)(1) and (2). Like U.S. citizens, these travelers are required to satisfy the inspecting CBP officer of their identities and citizenship at the time of their applications for admission. 8 CFR 235.1(f)(1). In accordance with current CBP operational procedures, a CBP Officer may accept documentary evidence of citizenship from Canadian and Bermudian citizens arriving from within the Western Hemisphere, such as a passport or birth certificate, or may, depending upon the circumstances presented, accept an oral declaration. CBP is now amending its field instructions to direct CBP Officers to no longer generally accept oral declarations as sufficient proof of citizenship and, instead, require documents that evidence identity and citizenship from U.S., Canadian, and Bermudian citizens entering the United States at land and sea ports-of-entry. Upon implementation, these changes in procedure will reduce the potential vulnerability posed by those who might falsely purport to be U.S., Canadian or Bermudian citizens trying to enter the United States by land or sea in reliance upon a mere oral declaration. Beginning on January 31, 2008, a person claiming U.S., Canadian, or Bermudian citizenship must establish that fact to the examining CBP Officer’s satisfaction by presenting a citizenship document such as a birth certificate as well as a government-issued photo identification document. CBP retains its authority to request additional documentation when warranted and to make appropriate individual exceptions. The instruction for CBP Officers to no longer generally accept oral declarations alone as satisfactory evidence of citizenship is a change in DHS and CBP internal operating procedures, and therefore is exempt from notice and comment rulemaking requirements under the Administrative Procedure Act, 5 U.S.C. 553(b). On June 26, 2007, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Department of State (DOS) published a joint notice of proposed rulemaking to implement the final phase of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI) and require persons entering the United States from Western Hemisphere countries to present a passport or other travel document as determined by the Secretary of Homeland Security. See 72 FR 35088. In the NPRM, DHS also explained that, separate from WHTI, beginning January 31, 2008, CBP would PO 00000 Frm 00081 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 72745 no longer accept oral declarations alone as proof of citizenship or identity at land and sea border ports-of-entry. DHS received five comments in response to the NRPM discussion on the change of practice concerning oral declarations. Although, as discussed above, the amendment to CBP procedures does not require notice and comment rulemaking, DHS will address those comments in the WHTI final rule. In summary, those comments were concerned about increased traffic and resulting travel delays at land border ports-of-entry stemming from document requirements. CBP will rely on its operational experience in processing travelers entering the United States by land to ensure that these changes are implemented in a manner that will minimize delays while achieving the security benefit underlying WHTI. Accordingly, effective January 31, 2008, CBP Officers will no longer generally allow travelers claiming to be U.S., Canadian, or Bermudian citizens to establish citizenship by relying only on an oral declaration. Beginning on that date, all travelers, including those claiming to be U.S., Canadian, or Bermudian citizens arriving by land and sea will generally be expected to present some form of documentation to satisfy the CBP Officer of his or her identity and citizenship. For example, such documentation may include a government-issued photo identification document presented with a citizenship document, such as a birth certificate. Dated: December 14, 2007. Jayson P. Ahern, Acting Commissioner, Customs and Border Protection. [FR Doc. E7–24691 Filed 12–20–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–14–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection [CBP Dec. 07– 95] Re-Accreditation and Re-Approval of Inspectorate America Corp., as a Commercial Gauger and Laboratory U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of re-approval of Inspectorate America Corp., of Martinez, California, as a commercial gauger and laboratory. AGENCY: SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to 19 CFR 151.12 and 151.13, Inspectorate America Corp., 3773 Pacheco Blvd., Suite C, Martinez, E:\FR\FM\21DEN1.SGM 21DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 245 (Friday, December 21, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 72744-72745]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-24691]


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DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

Bureau of Customs and Border Protection


Oral Declarations No Longer Satisfactory as Evidence of 
Citizenship and Identity

AGENCIES: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland 
Security.

[[Page 72745]]


ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: U.S., Canadian and Bermudian citizens entering the United 
States at land or sea ports-of-entry must establish their identity and 
citizenship to the satisfaction of a U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
(CBP) Officer. Under current CBP procedures, such individuals may 
provide any proof of identity and citizenship. While most individuals 
provide documentary evidence of citizenship, such as a passport or 
birth certificate, individuals may, depending on the circumstances, be 
admitted on an oral declaration. Accordingly, CBP is amending its field 
guidance procedures to instruct CBP officers that citizenship 
ordinarily may not be established using only an oral declaration.
    This Notice informs the public that, effective January 31, 2008, 
all travelers will be expected to present documents proving 
citizenship, such as a birth certificate, and government-issued 
documents proving identity, such as a driver's license, when entering 
the United States through land and sea ports of entry.

DATES: This notice is effective January 31, 2008.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Colleen Manaher, WHTI, Office of Field 
Operations, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 1300 Pennsylvania 
Avenue, NW., Room 5.4-D, Washington, DC 20229, telephone number (202) 
344-3003.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: All travelers entering the United States are 
inspected by a Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officer. To enter 
the United States in conformance with the Immigration and Nationality 
Act (INA), U.S. citizens, Canadians and Bermudians must satisfy the CBP 
Officer of their identity and citizenship. See 8 CFR 235.1(b) and 
235.1(f)(1).
    In accordance with current CBP operational procedures, a CBP 
Officer may accept documentary evidence of citizenship from U.S. 
citizens arriving at land or sea ports of entry from within the Western 
Hemisphere, such as a passport or birth certificate, or may accept an 
oral declaration if, depending upon the circumstances presented, such a 
declaration is deemed sufficient to prove citizenship. When assessing 
an assertion of citizenship, the CBP Officer may ask for additional 
identification and proof of citizenship until the CBP Officer is 
satisfied that the traveler seeking entry into the United States is a 
U.S. citizen.
    Similarly, certain nonimmigrant aliens who are citizens of Canada 
and Bermuda are exempt from presenting a passport when entering the 
United States as nonimmigrant visitors from countries in the Western 
Hemisphere at land or sea ports-of-entry. 8 CFR 212.1(a)(1) and (2). 
Like U.S. citizens, these travelers are required to satisfy the 
inspecting CBP officer of their identities and citizenship at the time 
of their applications for admission. 8 CFR 235.1(f)(1). In accordance 
with current CBP operational procedures, a CBP Officer may accept 
documentary evidence of citizenship from Canadian and Bermudian 
citizens arriving from within the Western Hemisphere, such as a 
passport or birth certificate, or may, depending upon the circumstances 
presented, accept an oral declaration.
    CBP is now amending its field instructions to direct CBP Officers 
to no longer generally accept oral declarations as sufficient proof of 
citizenship and, instead, require documents that evidence identity and 
citizenship from U.S., Canadian, and Bermudian citizens entering the 
United States at land and sea ports-of-entry.
    Upon implementation, these changes in procedure will reduce the 
potential vulnerability posed by those who might falsely purport to be 
U.S., Canadian or Bermudian citizens trying to enter the United States 
by land or sea in reliance upon a mere oral declaration. Beginning on 
January 31, 2008, a person claiming U.S., Canadian, or Bermudian 
citizenship must establish that fact to the examining CBP Officer's 
satisfaction by presenting a citizenship document such as a birth 
certificate as well as a government-issued photo identification 
document. CBP retains its authority to request additional documentation 
when warranted and to make appropriate individual exceptions.
    The instruction for CBP Officers to no longer generally accept oral 
declarations alone as satisfactory evidence of citizenship is a change 
in DHS and CBP internal operating procedures, and therefore is exempt 
from notice and comment rulemaking requirements under the 
Administrative Procedure Act, 5 U.S.C. 553(b).
    On June 26, 2007, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and 
Department of State (DOS) published a joint notice of proposed 
rulemaking to implement the final phase of the Western Hemisphere 
Travel Initiative (WHTI) and require persons entering the United States 
from Western Hemisphere countries to present a passport or other travel 
document as determined by the Secretary of Homeland Security. See 72 FR 
35088. In the NPRM, DHS also explained that, separate from WHTI, 
beginning January 31, 2008, CBP would no longer accept oral 
declarations alone as proof of citizenship or identity at land and sea 
border ports-of-entry.
    DHS received five comments in response to the NRPM discussion on 
the change of practice concerning oral declarations. Although, as 
discussed above, the amendment to CBP procedures does not require 
notice and comment rulemaking, DHS will address those comments in the 
WHTI final rule. In summary, those comments were concerned about 
increased traffic and resulting travel delays at land border ports-of-
entry stemming from document requirements. CBP will rely on its 
operational experience in processing travelers entering the United 
States by land to ensure that these changes are implemented in a manner 
that will minimize delays while achieving the security benefit 
underlying WHTI.
    Accordingly, effective January 31, 2008, CBP Officers will no 
longer generally allow travelers claiming to be U.S., Canadian, or 
Bermudian citizens to establish citizenship by relying only on an oral 
declaration. Beginning on that date, all travelers, including those 
claiming to be U.S., Canadian, or Bermudian citizens arriving by land 
and sea will generally be expected to present some form of 
documentation to satisfy the CBP Officer of his or her identity and 
citizenship. For example, such documentation may include a government-
issued photo identification document presented with a citizenship 
document, such as a birth certificate.

    Dated: December 14, 2007.
Jayson P. Ahern,
Acting Commissioner, Customs and Border Protection.
[FR Doc. E7-24691 Filed 12-20-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 9111-14-P