Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods and Sugar Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua, 72392-72394 [E7-24735]

Download as PDF 72392 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 244 / Thursday, December 20, 2007 / Notices • Any concerns or barriers to the establishment of and successful execution of a Negotiated Rulemaking Committee on these topics; and • Consultative activities and potential approaches to consultation that the Bureau might undertake regarding these issues. The draft convening report reflects CBI findings and preliminary recommendations to DOI, BIA, and BIE based on these interviews. The draft report will be made available to all interviewees for comment. Upon receipt of comments, CBI and the U.S. Institute will consider all comments and prepare a final report for the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education. All comments received on the draft will be made available to DOI, BIA, and BIE. The final report will also be made available to the interviewees, all interested tribes, and the general public via a Web site link. Authority: 20 U.S.C. 5601, et seq. Dated: December 13, 2007. Christopher L. Helms, Executive Director, Morris K. Udall Scholarship and Excellence in National Environmental Policy Foundation. [FR Doc. 07–6090 Filed 12–19–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6820–FN–M NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). ACTION: Notice. sroberts on PROD1PC70 with NOTICES AGENCY: SUMMARY: NARA is giving public notice that the agency has submitted to OMB for approval the information collections described in this notice. The public is invited to comment on the proposed information collections pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. DATES: Written comments must be submitted to OMB at the address below on or before January 22, 2008 to be assured of consideration. ADDRESSES: Send comments to Desk Officer for NARA, Office of Management and Budget, New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503; fax: 202–395–5167. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional information or copies of the proposed information collections and supporting statements should be directed to Tamee Fechhelm VerDate Aug<31>2005 20:08 Dec 19, 2007 Jkt 214001 at telephone number 301–713–1694 or fax number 301–713–7409. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104–13), NARA invites the general public and other Federal agencies to comment on proposed information collections. NARA published a notice of proposed collection for these information collections on October 9, 2007 (72 FR 57351). No comments were received. NARA has submitted the described information collections to OMB for approval. In response to this notice, comments and suggestions should address one or more of the following points: (a) Whether the proposed information collections are necessary for the proper performance of the functions of NARA; (b) the accuracy of NARA’s estimate of the burden of the proposed information collections; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including the use of information technology; and (e) whether small businesses are affected by these collections. In this notice, NARA is soliciting comments concerning the following information collections: 1. Title: Statistical Research in Archival Records Containing Personal Information. OMB number: 3095–0002. Agency form number: None. Type of review: Regular. Affected public: Individuals. Estimated number of respondents: 1. Estimated time per response: 7 hours. Frequency of response: On occasion. Estimated total annual burden hours: 7 hours. Abstract: The information collection is prescribed by 36 CFR 1256.28 and 36 CFR 1256.56. Respondents are researchers who wish to do biomedical statistical research in archival records containing highly personal information. NARA needs the information to evaluate requests for access to ensure that the requester meets the criteria in 36 CFR 1256.28 and that the proper safeguards will be made to protect the information. 2. Title: Application and Permit for Use of Space in Presidential Library and Grounds. OMB number: 3095–0024. Agency form number: NA Form 16011. Type of review: Regular. Affected public: Private organizations. Estimated number of respondents: 1,000. Estimated time per response: 20 minutes. PO 00000 Frm 00052 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Frequency of response: On occasion. Estimated total annual burden hours: 333 hours. Abstract: The information collection is prescribed by 36 CFR 1280.94. The application is submitted to a Presidential library to request the use of space in the library for a privately sponsored activity. NARA uses the information to determine whether use will meet the criteria in 36 CFR 1280.94 and to schedule the date. 3. Title: Request to use personal paper-to-paper copiers at the National Archives at the College Park facility. OMB number: 3095–0035. Agency form number: None. Type of review: Regular. Affected public: Business or other forprofit. Estimated number of respondents: 5. Estimated time per response: 3 hours. Frequency of response: On occasion. Estimated total annual burden hours: 15 hours. Abstract: The information collection is prescribed by 36 CFR 1254.86. Respondents are organizations that want to make paper-to-paper copies of archival holdings with their personal copiers. NARA uses the information to determine whether the request meets the criteria in 36 CFR 1254.86 and to schedule the limited space available. Dated: December 13, 2007. Martha Morphy, Assistant Archivist for Information Services. [FR Doc. E7–24744 Filed 12–19–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7515–01–P OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods and Sugar Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: SUMMARY: In accordance with relevant provisions of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS), the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) is providing notice of its determination of the trade surplus in certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Chile, Morocco, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. As described below, the level of a country’s trade surplus in these goods relates to the quantity of sugar E:\FR\FM\20DEN1.SGM 20DEN1 sroberts on PROD1PC70 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 244 / Thursday, December 20, 2007 / Notices and syrup goods and sugar-containing products for which the United States grants preferential tariff treatment under (i) the United States—Chile Free Trade Agreement (Chile FTA), in the case of Chile; (ii) the United States—Morocco Free Trade Agreement (Morocco FTA), in the case of Morocco; and (iii) the Dominican Republic—Central America—United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA–DR), in the case of the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. DATES: Effective Date: December 20, 2007. ADDRESSES: Inquiries may be mailed or delivered to Leslie O’Connor, Director of Agricultural Affairs, Office of Agricultural Affairs, Office of the United States Trade Representative, 600 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20508. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Leslie O’Connor, Office of Agricultural Affairs, 202–395–6127. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Chile: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States—Chile Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108–77; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 7746 of December 30, 2003 (68 FR 75789) implemented the Chile FTA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff and rules of origin treatment provided for in the Chile FTA. U.S. Note 12(a) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of the amount of Chile’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in Harmonized System (HS) subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.20, 1702.30, 1702.40, 1702.60, 1702.90, 1806.10, 2101.12, 2101.20, and 2106.90, except that Chile’s imports of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the Chile FTA are not included in the calculation of Chile’s trade surplus. U.S. Note 12(b) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.05 in an amount equal to the lesser of Chile’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.10 through 9911.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which Chile’s trade surplus VerDate Aug<31>2005 20:08 Dec 19, 2007 Jkt 214001 exceeds the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During calendar year (CY) 2006, the most recent year for which data is available, Chile’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 260,423 metric tons according to data published by its customs authority, the Servicio Nacional de Aduana. Based on this data, USTR determines that Chile’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 12(b) and U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99, goods of Chile are not eligible to enter the United States dutyfree under subheading 9911.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under subheading 9911.17.10 through 9911.17.85 in CY2008. Morocco: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States–Morocco Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. Law 108–302; 19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 7971 of December 22, 2005 (70 FR 76651) implemented the Morocco FTA on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff and rules of origin treatment provided for in the Morocco FTA. U.S. Note 12(a) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of the amount of Morocco’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that Morocco’s imports of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the Morocco FTA are not included in the calculation of Morocco’s trade surplus. U.S. Note 12(b) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.05 in an amount equal to the lesser of Morocco’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which Morocco’s trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that note for that calendar year. During CY2006, the most recent year for which data is available, Morocco’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products PO 00000 Frm 00053 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 72393 described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 658,890 metric tons according to data published by its customs authority, the Office des Changes. Based on this data, USTR determines that Morocco’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 12(b) and U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99, goods of Morocco are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9912.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under subheading 9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in CY2008. CAFTA–DR: Pursuant to section 201 of the Dominican Republic–Central America–United States Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 109–53; 19 U.S.C. 4031), Presidential Proclamation No. 7987 of February 28, 2006 (71 FR 10827), Presidential Proclamation No. 7991 of March 24, 2006 (71 FR 16009), Presidential Proclamation No. 7996 of March 31, 2006 (71 FR 16971), Presidential Proclamation No. 8034 of June 30, 2006 (71 FR 38509), and Presidential Proclamation No. 8111 of February 28, 2007 (72 FR 10025) implemented the CAFTA–DR on behalf of the United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff and rules of origin treatment provided for in the CAFTA–DR. U.S. Note 25(b)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a determination of the amount of each CAFTA–DR country’s trade surplus, by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that each CAFTA–DR country’s exports to the United States of goods classified under HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, and 1701.99 and its imports of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the CAFTA–DR are not included in the calculation of that country’s trade surplus. U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products of each CAFTA–DR country entered under subheading 9822.05.20 in an amount equal to the lesser of that country’s trade surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that country and that calendar year. During CY2006, the most recent year for which data is available, the Dominican Republic’s imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugarcontaining products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 102,649 metric tons according to data E:\FR\FM\20DEN1.SGM 20DEN1 sroberts on PROD1PC70 with NOTICES 72394 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 244 / Thursday, December 20, 2007 / Notices published by the Instituto Azucarero Dominicano. Based on this data, USTR determines that the Dominican Republic’s trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of the Dominican Republic are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY2008). During CY2006, the most recent year for which data is available, El Salvador’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 224,867 metric tons according to data published by the Salvadoran Central Bank. Based on this data, USTR determines that El Salvador’s trade surplus is 224,867 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, the aggregate quantity of goods of El Salvador that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY2008 is 24,960 metric tons (i.e., the amount set out in that note for El Salvador for 2008). During CY2006, the most recent year for which data is available, Guatemala’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 1,023,416 metric tons according to data published by the World Trade Atlas. Based on this data, USTR determines that Guatemala’s trade surplus is 1,023,416 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, the aggregate quantity of goods of Guatemala that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY2008 is 33,280 metric tons (i.e., the amount set out in that note for Guatemala for 2008). During CY2006, the most recent year for which data is available, Honduras’ exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 31,449 metric tons according to data published by the Central Bank of Honduras. Based on this data, USTR determines that Honduras’ trade surplus is 31,449 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, the aggregate quantity of goods of Honduras that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY2008 is 8,320 metric tons (i.e., the amount set out in that note for Honduras for 2008). During CY2006, the most recent year for which data is available, Nicaragua’s exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing products VerDate Aug<31>2005 20:08 Dec 19, 2007 Jkt 214001 described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 58,575 metric tons according to data published by the World Trade Atlas. Based on this data, USTR determines that Nicaragua’s trade surplus is 58,575 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, the aggregate quantity of goods of Nicaragua that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in CY2008 is 22,880 metric tons (i.e., the amount set out in that note for Nicaragua for 2008). James Murphy, Assistant United States Trade Representative. [FR Doc. E7–24735 Filed 12–19–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3190–W8–P OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Review of Revised Information Collection: RI 38–31 Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: SUMMARY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104–13, May 22, 1995), this notice announces that the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) intends to submit to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request for review of a revised information collection. RI 38–31, Request for Information About Your Missing Payment, is sent in response to a notification by an individual of the loss or non-receipt of a payment from the Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund. This form requests the information needed to enable OPM to trace and/or reissue payment. Missing payments may also be reported to OPM. Comments are particularly invited on: Whether this collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of functions of the Office of Personnel Management, and whether it will have practical utility; whether our estimate of the public burden of this collection of information is accurate, and based on valid assumptions and methodology; and ways in which we can minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, through the use of appropriate technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Approximately 8,000 reports of missing payments are processed each year. Of these, we estimate that 7,800 are reports of missing checks. Approximately 200 reports of missing checks are reported using RI 38–31 and PO 00000 Frm 00054 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 7,600 are reported by telephone. A response time of ten minutes per form reporting a missing check is estimated; the same amount of time is needed to report the missing checks or electronic funds transfer (EFT) payments using the telephone. The annual burden for reporting missing checks is 1,300 hours. The remaining 200 reports relate to EFT payments. No missing EFT payments are reported using RI 38–31. The annual burden for reporting missing EFT payments is 33 hours. The total burden is 1,333 hours. For copies of this proposal, contact Mary Beth Smith-Toomey on (202) 606– 8358, FAX (202) 418–3251 or via E-mail to MaryBeth.Smith-Toomey@opm.gov. Please include a mailing address with your request. DATES: Comments on this proposal should be received within 60 calendar days from the date of this publication. ADDRESSES: Send or deliver comments to—Ronald W. Melton, Deputy Assistant Director, Retirement Services Program, Center for Retirement and Insurance Services, U.S. Office of Personnel Management, 1900 E Street, NW., Room 3305, Washington, DC 20415–3500. FOR INFORMATION REGARDING ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATION—CONTACT: Cyrus S. Benson, Team Leader, Publications Team, RIS Support Services/Support Group, (202) 606– 0623. Office of Personnel Management. Howard Weizmann, Deputy Director. [FR Doc. E7–24705 Filed 12–19–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6325–38–P OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request for Revision of a Currently Approved Collection: OPM Form 1496A Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: SUMMARY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104–13, May 22, 1995), this notice announces that the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request for revision of a currently approved collection. OPM Form1496A, Application for Deferred Retirement (Separations on or after October 1, 1956) is used by eligible former Federal employees to apply for a deferred Civil Service annuity. Form E:\FR\FM\20DEN1.SGM 20DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 244 (Thursday, December 20, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 72392-72394]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-24735]


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OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE


Determination of Trade Surplus in Certain Sugar and Syrup Goods 
and Sugar Containing Products of Chile, Morocco, the Dominican 
Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua

AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In accordance with relevant provisions of the Harmonized 
Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS), the Office of the United 
States Trade Representative (USTR) is providing notice of its 
determination of the trade surplus in certain sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products of Chile, Morocco, the Dominican Republic, El 
Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. As described below, the 
level of a country's trade surplus in these goods relates to the 
quantity of sugar

[[Page 72393]]

and syrup goods and sugar-containing products for which the United 
States grants preferential tariff treatment under (i) the United 
States--Chile Free Trade Agreement (Chile FTA), in the case of Chile; 
(ii) the United States--Morocco Free Trade Agreement (Morocco FTA), in 
the case of Morocco; and (iii) the Dominican Republic--Central 
America--United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR), in the case of 
the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and 
Nicaragua.

DATES: Effective Date: December 20, 2007.

ADDRESSES: Inquiries may be mailed or delivered to Leslie O'Connor, 
Director of Agricultural Affairs, Office of Agricultural Affairs, 
Office of the United States Trade Representative, 600 17th Street, NW., 
Washington, DC 20508.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Leslie O'Connor, Office of 
Agricultural Affairs, 202-395-6127.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Chile: Pursuant to section 201 of the United 
States--Chile Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 108-77; 
19 U.S.C. 3805 note), Presidential Proclamation No. 7746 of December 
30, 2003 (68 FR 75789) implemented the Chile FTA on behalf of the 
United States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff and rules of 
origin treatment provided for in the Chile FTA.
    U.S. Note 12(a) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides that 
USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a 
determination of the amount of Chile's trade surplus, by volume, with 
all sources for goods in Harmonized System (HS) subheadings 1701.11, 
1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.20, 1702.30, 1702.40, 1702.60, 1702.90, 
1806.10, 2101.12, 2101.20, and 2106.90, except that Chile's imports of 
U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that 
qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the Chile FTA are not 
included in the calculation of Chile's trade surplus.
    U.S. Note 12(b) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-
free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.05 in an amount 
equal to the lesser of Chile's trade surplus or the specific quantity 
set out in that note for that calendar year.
    U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XI of HTS chapter 99 provides 
preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products of Chile entered under subheading 9911.17.10 
through 9911.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which Chile's 
trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that note for 
that calendar year.
    During calendar year (CY) 2006, the most recent year for which data 
is available, Chile's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-
containing products described above exceeded its exports of those goods 
by 260,423 metric tons according to data published by its customs 
authority, the Servicio Nacional de Aduana. Based on this data, USTR 
determines that Chile's trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in 
accordance with U.S. Note 12(b) and U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XI of 
HTS chapter 99, goods of Chile are not eligible to enter the United 
States duty-free under subheading 9911.17.05 or at preferential tariff 
rates under subheading 9911.17.10 through 9911.17.85 in CY2008.
    Morocco: Pursuant to section 201 of the United States-Morocco Free 
Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. Law 108-302; 19 U.S.C. 3805 
note), Presidential Proclamation No. 7971 of December 22, 2005 (70 FR 
76651) implemented the Morocco FTA on behalf of the United States and 
modified the HTS to reflect the tariff and rules of origin treatment 
provided for in the Morocco FTA.
    U.S. Note 12(a) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides that 
USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a 
determination of the amount of Morocco's trade surplus, by volume, with 
all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, 
1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that Morocco's imports of U.S. 
goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 1702.60 that qualify 
for preferential tariff treatment under the Morocco FTA are not 
included in the calculation of Morocco's trade surplus.
    U.S. Note 12(b) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides duty-
free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products of Morocco entered under subheading 9912.17.05 in an amount 
equal to the lesser of Morocco's trade surplus or the specific quantity 
set out in that note for that calendar year.
    U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99 provides 
preferential tariff treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products of Morocco entered under subheading 
9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in an amount equal to the amount by which 
Morocco's trade surplus exceeds the specific quantity set out in that 
note for that calendar year.
    During CY2006, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Morocco's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its exports of those goods by 658,890 
metric tons according to data published by its customs authority, the 
Office des Changes. Based on this data, USTR determines that Morocco's 
trade surplus is negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 
12(b) and U.S. Note 12(c) to subchapter XII of HTS chapter 99, goods of 
Morocco are not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under 
subheading 9912.17.05 or at preferential tariff rates under subheading 
9912.17.10 through 9912.17.85 in CY2008.
    CAFTA-DR: Pursuant to section 201 of the Dominican Republic-Central 
America-United States Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (Pub. L. 
109-53; 19 U.S.C. 4031), Presidential Proclamation No. 7987 of February 
28, 2006 (71 FR 10827), Presidential Proclamation No. 7991 of March 24, 
2006 (71 FR 16009), Presidential Proclamation No. 7996 of March 31, 
2006 (71 FR 16971), Presidential Proclamation No. 8034 of June 30, 2006 
(71 FR 38509), and Presidential Proclamation No. 8111 of February 28, 
2007 (72 FR 10025) implemented the CAFTA-DR on behalf of the United 
States and modified the HTS to reflect the tariff and rules of origin 
treatment provided for in the CAFTA-DR.
    U.S. Note 25(b)(i) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides 
that USTR is required to publish annually in the Federal Register a 
determination of the amount of each CAFTA-DR country's trade surplus, 
by volume, with all sources for goods in HS subheadings 1701.11, 
1701.12, 1701.91, 1701.99, 1702.40, and 1702.60, except that each 
CAFTA-DR country's exports to the United States of goods classified 
under HS subheadings 1701.11, 1701.12, 1701.91, and 1701.99 and its 
imports of U.S. goods classified under HS subheadings 1702.40 and 
1702.60 that qualify for preferential tariff treatment under the CAFTA-
DR are not included in the calculation of that country's trade surplus.
    U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98 provides 
duty-free treatment for certain sugar and syrup goods and sugar-
containing products of each CAFTA-DR country entered under subheading 
9822.05.20 in an amount equal to the lesser of that country's trade 
surplus or the specific quantity set out in that note for that country 
and that calendar year.
    During CY2006, the most recent year for which data is available, 
the Dominican Republic's imports of the sugar and syrup goods and 
sugar-containing products described above exceeded its exports of those 
goods by 102,649 metric tons according to data

[[Page 72394]]

published by the Instituto Azucarero Dominicano. Based on this data, 
USTR determines that the Dominican Republic's trade surplus is 
negative. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to 
subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, goods of the Dominican Republic are 
not eligible to enter the United States duty-free under subheading 
9822.05.20 in CY2008).
    During CY2006, the most recent year for which data is available, El 
Salvador's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 224,867 
metric tons according to data published by the Salvadoran Central Bank. 
Based on this data, USTR determines that El Salvador's trade surplus is 
224,867 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) 
to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, the aggregate quantity of goods 
of El Salvador that may be entered duty-free under subheading 
9822.05.20 in CY2008 is 24,960 metric tons (i.e., the amount set out in 
that note for El Salvador for 2008).
    During CY2006, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Guatemala's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 
1,023,416 metric tons according to data published by the World Trade 
Atlas. Based on this data, USTR determines that Guatemala's trade 
surplus is 1,023,416 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. 
Note 25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, the aggregate 
quantity of goods of Guatemala that may be entered duty-free under 
subheading 9822.05.20 in CY2008 is 33,280 metric tons (i.e., the amount 
set out in that note for Guatemala for 2008).
    During CY2006, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Honduras' exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 31,449 
metric tons according to data published by the Central Bank of 
Honduras. Based on this data, USTR determines that Honduras' trade 
surplus is 31,449 metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 
25(b)(ii) to subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, the aggregate quantity 
of goods of Honduras that may be entered duty-free under subheading 
9822.05.20 in CY2008 is 8,320 metric tons (i.e., the amount set out in 
that note for Honduras for 2008).
    During CY2006, the most recent year for which data is available, 
Nicaragua's exports of the sugar and syrup goods and sugar-containing 
products described above exceeded its imports of those goods by 58,575 
metric tons according to data published by the World Trade Atlas. Based 
on this data, USTR determines that Nicaragua's trade surplus is 58,575 
metric tons. Therefore, in accordance with U.S. Note 25(b)(ii) to 
subchapter XXII of HTS chapter 98, the aggregate quantity of goods of 
Nicaragua that may be entered duty-free under subheading 9822.05.20 in 
CY2008 is 22,880 metric tons (i.e., the amount set out in that note for 
Nicaragua for 2008).

James Murphy,
Assistant United States Trade Representative.
[FR Doc. E7-24735 Filed 12-19-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3190-W8-P