List of Programs Eligible for Inclusion in Fiscal Year 2008 Funding Agreements To Be Negotiated With Self-Governance Tribes, 65593-65595 [E7-22733]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 224 / Wednesday, November 21, 2007 / Notices Nugent Farms Special Resource Study, 404–562–3124, extension 637. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service National Park Service, Interior. Notice of Intent to prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on the Special Resource Study for Castle Nugent Farms, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. AGENCY: ACTION: Pursuant to section 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, and National Park Service (NPS) policy in Director’s Order 2 (Park Planning) and Director’s Order 12 (Conservation Planning, Environmental Impact Analysis, and Decision-making), the NPS will prepare an EIS for the Special Resource Study (SRS) for Castle Nugent Farms. The NPS will conduct local public meetings to receive input from interested parties on issues, concerns and suggestions believed to be relevant to the future of Castle Nugent Farms and its potential inclusion as a unit of the National Park System. Of particular interest to the NPS are suggestions and ideas for managing cultural and natural resources, interpretation, and the visitor experience at Castle Nugent Farms. The Draft EIS will formulate and evaluate environmental impacts associated with various types and levels of visitor use and resources management at the site. DATES: The dates and times of the public scoping meetings will be published in local newspapers and on the internet at http://parkplanning.nps.gov. These dates and times may also be obtained by contacting the NPS Southeast Regional Office, Division of Planning and Compliance. Scoping suggestions will be accepted throughout the planning process. The NPS anticipates that the Draft EIS will be available for public review by January 2009. ADDRESSES: The locations of the public scoping meetings will be published in local newspapers and on the internet at http://parkplanning.nps.gov. Suggestions and ideas should be submitted in writing to the following address: John Barrett, Planning Team Leader, Castle Nugent Farms Special Resource Study, NPS Southeast Regional Office, Division of Planning and Compliance, 100 Alabama Street, SW., 6th Floor, 1924 Building, Atlanta, Georgia 30303. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John Barrett, Planning Team Leader, Castle pwalker on PROD1PC71 with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:56 Nov 20, 2007 Castle Nugent Farms consists of approximately 1,400 acres on the southeastern shore of St. Croix. The rolling terrain consists of a mixture of dry forest, native vegetation, and rangeland that slopes down from an elevation of 750 feet to the sea. The property has a long and diverse history of farming dating back to the 1730s when it was first established as a cotton and sugar plantation. In the 19th century, N’Dama cattle breeding was brought to Castle Nugent Farms. This breed was a prominent part of the farm’s operations until the 1950s, when attention shifted towards raising an N’Dama cross breed of cattle known as Senepol. Today, Senepol cattle are still bred under an agreement between the property’s owners and the University of the Virgin Islands. Issues currently being considered for the SRS/EIS include a determination of Castle Nugent Farm’s national significance and an assessment of the site’s suitability and feasibility as a potential addition to the National Park System. The Draft EIS will identify cultural and natural resources of Castle Nugent Farms and evaluate a range of potential management options that might adequately protect these resources and provide for public use and enjoyment. Our practice is to make comments, including names, home addresses, home phone numbers, and e-mail addresses of respondents, available for public review. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. We will always make submissions from organizations or businesses, and from individuals identifying themselves as representatives or officials of organizations or businesses, available for public inspection in their entirety. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice of Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on the Special Resource Study for Castle Nugent Farms, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands Jkt 214001 Authority: The authority for publishing this notice is contained in 40 CFR 1506.6. The responsible official for this EIS is Art Frederick, Acting Regional Director, Southeast Region, National Park Service, 100 Alabama Street, SW., 1924 Building, Atlanta, Georgia 30303. PO 00000 Frm 00037 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 65593 Dated: September 19, 2007. Art Frederick, Acting Regional Director, Southeast Region. [FR Doc. E7–22723 Filed 11–20–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–53–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service List of Programs Eligible for Inclusion in Fiscal Year 2008 Funding Agreements To Be Negotiated With Self-Governance Tribes National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: SUMMARY: This notice lists programs or portions of programs that are eligible for inclusion in Fiscal Year 2008 funding agreements with self-governance tribes and lists programmatic targets pursuant to section 405(c)(4) of the Tribal SelfGovernance Act. DATES: This notice expires on September 30, 2008. ADDRESSES: Inquiries or comments regarding this notice may be directed to the American Indian Liaison Office, 1201 Eye Street, NW. (Org. 2560, 9th Floor), Washington, DC 20005. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Title II of the Indian SelfDetermination Act Amendments of 1994 (Pub. L. 103–413, the ‘‘Tribal SelfGovernance Act’’ or the ‘‘Act’’) instituted a permanent self-governance program at the Department of the Interior (DOI). Under the selfgovernance program certain programs, services, functions, and activities, or portions thereof, in DOI bureaus other than the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) are eligible to be planned, conducted, consolidated, and administered by a self-governance tribal government. Under section 405(c) of the Act, the Secretary of the Interior is required to publish annually: (1) A list of non-BIA programs, services, functions, and activities, or portions thereof, that are eligible for inclusion in agreements negotiated under the self-governance program; and (2) programmatic targets for these bureaus. Under the Act, two categories of nonBIA programs are eligible for selfgovernance funding agreements (AFAs): (1) Under section 403(b)(2) of the Act, any non-BIA program, service, function or activity that is administered by DOI that is ‘‘otherwise available to Indian tribes or Indians,’’ can be administered by a tribal government through a selfgovernance funding agreement. The E:\FR\FM\21NON1.SGM 21NON1 65594 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 224 / Wednesday, November 21, 2007 / Notices pwalker on PROD1PC71 with NOTICES Department interprets this provision to authorize the inclusion of programs eligible for self-determination contracts under Title I of the Indian SelfDetermination and Education Assistance Act (Pub. L. 93–638, as amended). Section 403(b)(2) also specifies ‘‘nothing in this subsection may be construed to provide any tribe with a preference with respect to the opportunity of the tribe to administer programs, services, functions and activities, or portions thereof, unless such preference is otherwise provided by law.’’ (2) Under section 403(c) of the Act, the Secretary may include other programs, services, functions, and activities or portions thereof that are of ‘‘special geographic, historical, or cultural significance’’ to a selfgovernance tribe. Under section 403(k) of the Act, funding agreements cannot include programs, services, functions, or activities that are inherently Federal or where the statute establishing the existing program does not authorize the type of participation sought by the tribe. However, a tribe (or tribes) need not be identified in the authorizing statutes in order for a program or element to be included in a self-governance funding agreement. While general legal and policy guidance regarding what constitutes an inherently Federal function exists, we will determine whether a specific function is inherently Federal on a case-by-case basis considering the totality of circumstances. II. Eligible non-BIA Programs of the National Park Service Below is a listing of the types of nonBIA programs, or portions thereof, that may be eligible for self-governance funding agreements because they are either ‘‘otherwise available to Indians’’ under Title I and not precluded by any other law, or may have ‘‘special geographic, historical, or cultural significance’’ to a participating tribe. The list represents the most current information on programs potentially available to tribes under a selfgovernance funding agreement. The National Park Service will also consider for inclusion in funding agreements other programs or activities not included below, but which, upon request of a self-governance tribe, the National Park Service determines to be eligible under either sections 403(b)(2) or 403(c) of the Act. Tribes with an interest in such potential agreements are encouraged to begin such discussions. The National Park Service welcomes comments from self-governance VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:56 Nov 20, 2007 Jkt 214001 regarding the content and format of this list. The National Park Service administers the National Park System, which is made up of national parks, monuments, historic sites, battlefields, seashores, lake shores, and recreation areas. The National Park Service maintains the park units, protects the natural and cultural resources, and conducts a range of visitor services such as law enforcement, park maintenance, and interpretation of geology, history, and natural and cultural resources. Some elements of the following programs may be eligible for inclusion in a self-governance funding agreement. This listing below was developed considering the proximity of an identified self-governance tribe to a national park, monument, preserve, or recreation area and the types of programs that have components that may be suitable for contracting through a self-governance agreement. This listing is not all-inclusive, but is representative of the types of programs which may be eligible for tribal participation through a funding agreement. a. Archaeological Surveys b. Comprehensive Management Planning c. Cultural Resource Management Projects d. Ethnographic Studies e. Erosion Control f. Fire Protection g. Gathering Baseline Subsistence Data, Alaska h. Hazardous Fuel Reduction i. Housing Construction and Rehabilitation j. Interpretation k. Janitorial Services l. Maintenance m. Natural Resource Management Projects n. Operation of Campgrounds o. Range Assessment, Alaska p. Reindeer Grazing, Alaska q. Road Repair r. Solid Waste Collection and Disposal s. Trail Rehabilitation t. Watershed Restoration and Maintenance u. Beringia Research v. Elwha River Restoration Locations of National Park Service Units With Close Proximity to SelfGovernance Tribes 1. Bering Land Bridge National Park, Alaska. 2. Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Alaska. 3. Gates of the Arctic National Park & Preserve, Alaska. 4. Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska. PO 00000 Frm 00038 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 5. Katmai National Park and Preserve, Alaska. 6. Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska. 7. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Alaska. 8. Kobuk Valley National Park, Alaska. 9. Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, Alaska. 10. Noatak National Preserve, Alaska. 11. Sitka National Historical Park, Alaska. 12. Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska. 13. Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, Alaska. 14. Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, Arizona. 15. Hohokam Pima National Monument, Arizona. 16. Montezuma Castle National Monument, Arizona. 17. Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona. 18. Saguaro National Park, Arizona. 19. onto National Monument, Arizona. 20. Tumacacori National Historical Park, Arizona. 21. Tuzigoot National Monument, Arizona. 22. Arkansas Post National Memorial, Arkansas. 23. Joshua Tree National Park, California. 24. Lassen Volcanic National Park, California. 25. Redwood National Park, California. 26. Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, California. 27. Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument, Idaho. 28. Effigy Mounds National Monument, Iowa. 29. Fort Scott National Historic Site, Kansas. 30. Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, Kansas. 31. Boston Harbor Islands, a National Park Area, Massachusetts. 32. Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts. 33. New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park, Massachusetts. 34. Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Michigan. 35. Grand Portage National Monument, Minnesota. 36. Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. 37. Bear Paw Battlefield, Nez Perce National Historical Park, Montana. 38. Glacier National Park, Montana. 39. Great Basin National Park, Nevada. 40. Aztec Ruins National Monument, New Mexico. 41. Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico. E:\FR\FM\21NON1.SGM 21NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 224 / Wednesday, November 21, 2007 / Notices 42. Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico. 43. Chaco Culture National Historical Park, New Mexico. 44. White Sands National Monument, New Mexico. 45. Fort Stanwix National Monument, New York. 46. Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ohio. 47. Hopewell Culture National Historical Park, Ohio. 48. Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Oklahoma. 49. John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Oregon. 50. Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument, Texas. 51. Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas. 52. Lake Meredith National Recreation Area, Texas. 53. Ebey’s Landing National Recreation Area, Texas. 54. Mt. Rainier National Park, Washington. 55. Olympic National Park, Washington. 56. San Juan Islands National Historical Park, Washington. 57. Whitman Mission National Historic Site, Washington. For questions regarding selfgovernance contact Dr. Patricia Parker, Chief, American Indian Liaison Office, National Park Service, 1201 Eye Street, NW., (Org. 2560, 9th Floor), Washington, DC 20005, telephone 202– 354–6965, fax 202–371–6609. III. Programmatic Targets pwalker on PROD1PC71 with NOTICES During Fiscal Year 2008, upon request of a self-governance tribe, the National Park Service will negotiate funding agreements for its eligible programs beyond those already negotiated. The National Park Service currently has self-governance annual funding agreements with the Yurok Tribe and Redwood National Park, the Grand Portage Band of Chippewa Indians and Grand Portage National Monument, and the Lower Elwha Tribal Community and Olympic National Park. Dated: October 31, 2007. David Verhey, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks. [FR Doc. E7–22733 Filed 11–20–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:56 Nov 20, 2007 Jkt 214001 INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 332–491] China: Government Policies Affecting U.S. Trade in Selected Sectors United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice of addition of case studies on the semi-fabricated copper and brass products sector and paper sector in China; request for information and views from interested parties. AGENCY: SUMMARY: In its notice announcing institution of this investigation, the Commission indicated that its report would include case studies on industry sectors in China in which government policies and interventions are prevalent, and the notice identified seven industry sectors that would be the subject of such case studies. After receiving and considering public comment and input from other government agencies regarding possible additional case studies, the Commission has decided to include case studies on two additional industry sectors in China, the semifabricated copper and brass products sector, and the paper sector. DATES: February 1, 2008: Deadline for filing written submissions. July 29, 2008: Transmittal of Commission report to the Committee on Ways and Means. ADDRESSES: All Commission offices, including the Commission’s hearing rooms, are located in the United States International Trade Commission Building, 500 E Street, SW., Washington, DC. All written submissions should be addressed to the Secretary, United States International Trade Commission, 500 E Street, SW., Washington, DC 20436. The public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission’s electronic docket (EDIS) at http://www.usitc.gov/ secretary/edis.htm. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Project leaders Joanne Guth (202–205– 3264 or joanne.guth@usitc.gov) or Deborah McNay (202–205–3425 or deborah.mcnay@usitc.gov) for information on the investigation. For information on the legal aspects of the investigation, contact William Gearhart of the Commission’s Office of the General Counsel (202–205–3091 or william.gearhart@usitc.gov). The media should contact Margaret O’Laughlin, Office of External Relations (202–205– 1819 or margaret.olaughlin@usitc.gov). Hearing-impaired individuals may obtain information on this matter by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal at 202–205–1810. General PO 00000 Frm 00039 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 65595 information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its Internet server (http://www.usitc.gov). Persons with mobility impairments who will need special assistance in gaining access to the Commission should contact the Office of the Secretary at 202–205–2000. Background The investigation is being conducted at the request of the Committee on Ways and Means of the U.S. House of Representatives. In its letter of May 23, 2007, the Committee requested that the Commission’s report include, among other things, case studies on sectors in China where government policies and interventions are prevalent, and identified seven such sectors: The semiconductor, telecom, banking, textiles and apparel, steel, automotive parts, and aircraft sectors. The Committee also directed that the Commission seek public comment and input from other government agencies on other sectors that should be included as case studies. Notice of institution and the scheduling of a public hearing (which was held on October 30, 2007) was published in the Federal Register of July 31, 2007 (72 FR 41773). Written Submissions All written submissions should be addressed to the Secretary, and should be received not later than 5:15 p.m., February 1, 2008. All written submissions must conform with the provisions of section 201.8 of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (19 CFR 201.8). Section 201.8 requires that a signed original (or a copy so designated) and fourteen (14) copies of each document be filed. In the event that confidential treatment of a document is requested, at least four (4) additional copies must be filed, in which the confidential information must be deleted (see the following paragraph for further information regarding confidential business information). The Commission’s rules authorize filing submissions with the Secretary by facsimile or electronic means only to the extent permitted by section 201.8 of the rules (see Handbook for Electronic Filing Procedures, http:// www.usitc.gov/secretary/ fed_reg_notices/rules/documents/ handbook_on_electronic_filing.pdf). Persons with questions regarding electronic filing should contact the Secretary (202–205–2000). Any submissions that contain confidential business information must also conform with the requirements of section 201.6 of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (19 CFR E:\FR\FM\21NON1.SGM 21NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 224 (Wednesday, November 21, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 65593-65595]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-22733]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


List of Programs Eligible for Inclusion in Fiscal Year 2008 
Funding Agreements To Be Negotiated With Self-Governance Tribes

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This notice lists programs or portions of programs that are 
eligible for inclusion in Fiscal Year 2008 funding agreements with 
self-governance tribes and lists programmatic targets pursuant to 
section 405(c)(4) of the Tribal Self-Governance Act.

DATES: This notice expires on September 30, 2008.

ADDRESSES: Inquiries or comments regarding this notice may be directed 
to the American Indian Liaison Office, 1201 Eye Street, NW. (Org. 2560, 
9th Floor), Washington, DC 20005.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

I. Background

    Title II of the Indian Self-Determination Act Amendments of 1994 
(Pub. L. 103-413, the ``Tribal Self-Governance Act'' or the ``Act'') 
instituted a permanent self-governance program at the Department of the 
Interior (DOI). Under the self-governance program certain programs, 
services, functions, and activities, or portions thereof, in DOI 
bureaus other than the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) are eligible to 
be planned, conducted, consolidated, and administered by a self-
governance tribal government.
    Under section 405(c) of the Act, the Secretary of the Interior is 
required to publish annually: (1) A list of non-BIA programs, services, 
functions, and activities, or portions thereof, that are eligible for 
inclusion in agreements negotiated under the self-governance program; 
and (2) programmatic targets for these bureaus.
    Under the Act, two categories of non-BIA programs are eligible for 
self-governance funding agreements (AFAs):
    (1) Under section 403(b)(2) of the Act, any non-BIA program, 
service, function or activity that is administered by DOI that is 
``otherwise available to Indian tribes or Indians,'' can be 
administered by a tribal government through a self-governance funding 
agreement. The

[[Page 65594]]

Department interprets this provision to authorize the inclusion of 
programs eligible for self-determination contracts under Title I of the 
Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (Pub. L. 93-638, 
as amended). Section 403(b)(2) also specifies ``nothing in this 
subsection may be construed to provide any tribe with a preference with 
respect to the opportunity of the tribe to administer programs, 
services, functions and activities, or portions thereof, unless such 
preference is otherwise provided by law.''
    (2) Under section 403(c) of the Act, the Secretary may include 
other programs, services, functions, and activities or portions thereof 
that are of ``special geographic, historical, or cultural 
significance'' to a self-governance tribe.
    Under section 403(k) of the Act, funding agreements cannot include 
programs, services, functions, or activities that are inherently 
Federal or where the statute establishing the existing program does not 
authorize the type of participation sought by the tribe. However, a 
tribe (or tribes) need not be identified in the authorizing statutes in 
order for a program or element to be included in a self-governance 
funding agreement. While general legal and policy guidance regarding 
what constitutes an inherently Federal function exists, we will 
determine whether a specific function is inherently Federal on a case-
by-case basis considering the totality of circumstances.

II. Eligible non-BIA Programs of the National Park Service

    Below is a listing of the types of non-BIA programs, or portions 
thereof, that may be eligible for self-governance funding agreements 
because they are either ``otherwise available to Indians'' under Title 
I and not precluded by any other law, or may have ``special geographic, 
historical, or cultural significance'' to a participating tribe. The 
list represents the most current information on programs potentially 
available to tribes under a self-governance funding agreement.
    The National Park Service will also consider for inclusion in 
funding agreements other programs or activities not included below, but 
which, upon request of a self-governance tribe, the National Park 
Service determines to be eligible under either sections 403(b)(2) or 
403(c) of the Act. Tribes with an interest in such potential agreements 
are encouraged to begin such discussions.
    The National Park Service welcomes comments from self-governance 
regarding the content and format of this list.
    The National Park Service administers the National Park System, 
which is made up of national parks, monuments, historic sites, 
battlefields, seashores, lake shores, and recreation areas. The 
National Park Service maintains the park units, protects the natural 
and cultural resources, and conducts a range of visitor services such 
as law enforcement, park maintenance, and interpretation of geology, 
history, and natural and cultural resources.
    Some elements of the following programs may be eligible for 
inclusion in a self-governance funding agreement. This listing below 
was developed considering the proximity of an identified self-
governance tribe to a national park, monument, preserve, or recreation 
area and the types of programs that have components that may be 
suitable for contracting through a self-governance agreement. This 
listing is not all-inclusive, but is representative of the types of 
programs which may be eligible for tribal participation through a 
funding agreement.
    a. Archaeological Surveys
    b. Comprehensive Management Planning
    c. Cultural Resource Management Projects
    d. Ethnographic Studies
    e. Erosion Control
    f. Fire Protection
    g. Gathering Baseline Subsistence Data, Alaska
    h. Hazardous Fuel Reduction
    i. Housing Construction and Rehabilitation
    j. Interpretation
    k. Janitorial Services
    l. Maintenance
    m. Natural Resource Management Projects
    n. Operation of Campgrounds
    o. Range Assessment, Alaska
    p. Reindeer Grazing, Alaska
    q. Road Repair
    r. Solid Waste Collection and Disposal
    s. Trail Rehabilitation
    t. Watershed Restoration and Maintenance
    u. Beringia Research
    v. Elwha River Restoration
    Locations of National Park Service Units With Close Proximity to 
Self-Governance Tribes
    1. Bering Land Bridge National Park, Alaska.
    2. Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Alaska.
    3. Gates of the Arctic National Park & Preserve, Alaska.
    4. Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska.
    5. Katmai National Park and Preserve, Alaska.
    6. Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska.
    7. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Alaska.
    8. Kobuk Valley National Park, Alaska.
    9. Lake Clark National Park and Preserve, Alaska.
    10. Noatak National Preserve, Alaska.
    11. Sitka National Historical Park, Alaska.
    12. Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska.
    13. Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, Alaska.
    14. Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, Arizona.
    15. Hohokam Pima National Monument, Arizona.
    16. Montezuma Castle National Monument, Arizona.
    17. Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona.
    18. Saguaro National Park, Arizona.
    19. onto National Monument, Arizona.
    20. Tumacacori National Historical Park, Arizona.
    21. Tuzigoot National Monument, Arizona.
    22. Arkansas Post National Memorial, Arkansas.
    23. Joshua Tree National Park, California.
    24. Lassen Volcanic National Park, California.
    25. Redwood National Park, California.
    26. Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, California.
    27. Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument, Idaho.
    28. Effigy Mounds National Monument, Iowa.
    29. Fort Scott National Historic Site, Kansas.
    30. Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, Kansas.
    31. Boston Harbor Islands, a National Park Area, Massachusetts.
    32. Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts.
    33. New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park, Massachusetts.
    34. Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Michigan.
    35. Grand Portage National Monument, Minnesota.
    36. Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota.
    37. Bear Paw Battlefield, Nez Perce National Historical Park, 
Montana.
    38. Glacier National Park, Montana.
    39. Great Basin National Park, Nevada.
    40. Aztec Ruins National Monument, New Mexico.
    41. Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico.

[[Page 65595]]

    42. Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico.
    43. Chaco Culture National Historical Park, New Mexico.
    44. White Sands National Monument, New Mexico.
    45. Fort Stanwix National Monument, New York.
    46. Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ohio.
    47. Hopewell Culture National Historical Park, Ohio.
    48. Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Oklahoma.
    49. John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Oregon.
    50. Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument, Texas.
    51. Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas.
    52. Lake Meredith National Recreation Area, Texas.
    53. Ebey's Landing National Recreation Area, Texas.
    54. Mt. Rainier National Park, Washington.
    55. Olympic National Park, Washington.
    56. San Juan Islands National Historical Park, Washington.
    57. Whitman Mission National Historic Site, Washington.
    For questions regarding self-governance contact Dr. Patricia 
Parker, Chief, American Indian Liaison Office, National Park Service, 
1201 Eye Street, NW., (Org. 2560, 9th Floor), Washington, DC 20005, 
telephone 202-354-6965, fax 202-371-6609.

III. Programmatic Targets

    During Fiscal Year 2008, upon request of a self-governance tribe, 
the National Park Service will negotiate funding agreements for its 
eligible programs beyond those already negotiated.
    The National Park Service currently has self-governance annual 
funding agreements with the Yurok Tribe and Redwood National Park, the 
Grand Portage Band of Chippewa Indians and Grand Portage National 
Monument, and the Lower Elwha Tribal Community and Olympic National 
Park.

    Dated: October 31, 2007.
David Verhey,
Acting Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks.
 [FR Doc. E7-22733 Filed 11-20-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P