Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 65354-65355 [E7-22669]

Download as PDF 65354 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 223 / Tuesday, November 20, 2007 / Notices the San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the sacred object/object of cultural patrimony should contact Nell Murphy, Director of Cultural Resources, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024, telephone (212) 769–5837, before December 20, 2007. Repatriation of the sacred object/object of cultural patrimony to the San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The American Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; Tonto Apache Tribe of Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; and Yavapai–Apache Nation of the Camp Verde Indian Reservation, Arizona that this notice has been published. Dated: October 18, 2007 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–22674 Filed 11–19–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Coronado National Forest, Tucson, AZ and Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. pwalker on PROD1PC71 with NOTICES AGENCY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Coronado National Forest, Tucson, AZ that meet the definition of ‘‘objects of cultural patrimony’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:01 Nov 19, 2007 Jkt 214001 The 58 cultural items are part of an archeological collection known as the Pinaleno Cotton Cache. The 58 cultural items are 2 caches of raw, native cotton; 3 ceramic jars; 3 ceramic bowls; 2 coiled basketry bowls; 1 coiled basketry pot stand; and 47 botanical and faunal items. In 1982, the Pinaleno Cotton Cache was found near Safford, AZ, by local residents on lands administered by the Forest Service. In 1983, the existence of the cache was reported to the Forest Service. Officials of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service removed cultural items in the cache for curation at the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. Subsequently, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service law enforcement officers recovered the two coiled baskets from individuals who had removed the items illegally during the interval between the discovery of the cache and its removal by the Forest Service. The ceramic vessels in the cache have characteristics associated with both the Hohokam and Mogollon cultures in the 10th through the 12th century. The coiled basketry pieces were constructed with a method (two–rod–and–bundle) shared by many people throughout the prehistoric Southwestern United States. In addition, basket fragments with a similar construction technique were found at Ventana Cave on the Tohono O’odham reservation. Studies of the cultural items in the Pinaleno Cotton Cache have established that the site was a shrine that was visited at intervals from the 7th through the 13th century, and that the items left at the site were ceremonial offerings. In a 1995 study, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service determined that Hohokam cultural materials of the 7th through the 13th century from the Safford area in Arizona are culturally affiliated with the Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona. During consultation, cultural and religious leaders of the Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona indicated that the cultural items in the Pinaleno Cotton Cache were of Tohono O’odham ancestry. The tribal representatives also indicated that the cultural items were objects of cultural patrimony associated with the ancestral Tohono O’odham culture and had ongoing historical, traditional or cultural importance and was property owned by the tribe. Officials of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(D), the 58 cultural items described above have ongoing historical, traditional or cultural importance PO 00000 Frm 00067 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. Officials of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the objects of cultural patrimony and the Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the objects of cultural patrimony should contact Dr. Frank E. Wozniak, NAGPRA Coordinator, Southwestern Region, USDA Forest Service, 333 Broadway Blvd., SE, Albuquerque, NM 87102, telephone (505) 842–3238, before December 20, 2007. Repatriation of the objects of cultural patrimony to the Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Coronado National Forest is responsible for notifying the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima– Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona that this notice has been published. Dated: October 25, 2007. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–22671 Filed 11–19–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Horner Collection, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR that meet the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary objects’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal E:\FR\FM\20NON1.SGM 20NON1 pwalker on PROD1PC71 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 223 / Tuesday, November 20, 2007 / Notices agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. The five cultural items are one antler tool; one nose ring or bracelet; one mortar and pestle; one jar of beads; and one bag of bells. The Museum of Oregon Country, Oregon Agricultural College was renamed the John B. Horner Museum of the Oregon Country in 1936, and became commonly known as the Horner Museum. The Oregon Agricultural College was renamed Oregon State College in 1937, and became Oregon State University in 1962. The Horner Museum closed in 1995. Currently, cultural items from the Horner Museum are referred to as the Horner Collection, which is owned by, and in the possession of, Oregon State University. Horner Collection, Oregon State University professional staff consulted with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians of Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon; Coquille Tribe of Oregon; and Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California. On March 17, 1929, V.P. Mitchell removed a ‘‘horn implement’’ from an unknown site near Yachats, OR. On December 21, 1933, V.P. Mitchell donated the antler horn implement to the museum and listed as part of the J. G. Crawford collection. Although the Horner Collection, Oregon State University has no documentation that the antler tool was ever buried with any individual, Mr. Crawford is known to have collected human remains and cultural items from burials and mounds. On December 21, 1933, V.P. Mitchell donated a nose ring or bracelet to the museum. Provenience records show that the item was in V.P. Mitchell’s possession in 1929 and is listed as a ‘‘Yachats Indian nose ring.’’ On June 27, 2006, a representative of the Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California identified the item as a bracelet of a young lady or grandmother. On February 11, 2004, a representative of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, Oregon identified the cultural item as a funerary object from Yachats, OR. At an unknown date, cultural items were removed by Mrs. P. Mitchell from an unknown area near Yachats, OR. On April 13, 1968, Mrs. Mitchell donated one mortar and pestle, one jar of Indian beads, and one bag of bells, along with a human skull, to the museum. A deed of gift was submitted, which states VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:01 Nov 19, 2007 Jkt 214001 ‘‘Collection of Indian artifacts found near Yachats, OR.’’ The Horner Collection, Oregon State University has no specific documentation that the cultural items were ever buried with any individual. However, with the inclusion of a human skull donated with the cultural items, the museum has identified them as unassociated funerary objects. The human remains are described in a previously published Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register of October 26, 2005 (FR Doc 05–21332, pages 61839–61840). All of the above cultural items were removed from undisclosed locations near Yachats, OR. According to a tribal representative for the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon, the Yachats area had large middens lining the lower Yachats River and nearby coastline. Large middens show the extensive time period of occupation of the Yachats area. The Yachats area was made part of the Siletz/Coast Reservation when it was established in 1855. This area was inhabited by the Alsea, Coos, Lower Umpqua, some South Slough and lower Coquille people, and some members of other tribes also confederated upon the Siletz Reservation. The Alsea people, as well as others that lived at Yachats, moved to the Siletz reservation in 1876. Descendants of tribes from the Yachats area are members of the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon. Based on geographic, historic documents, museum and donor history, and consultation evidence, the Horner Collection, Oregon State University reasonably believe the cultural items to be unassociated funerary objects and culturally affiliated with the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon. Officials of the Horner Collection, Oregon State University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the five cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. Officials of the Horner Collection, Oregon State University also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally PO 00000 Frm 00068 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 65355 affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, President’s Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration Building, Corvallis, OR 97331, telephone (541) 737–8260, before December 20, 2007. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Horner Collection, Oregon State University is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians of Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon; Coquille Tribe of Oregon; and Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California that this notice has been published. Dated: October 18, 2007. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–22669 Filed 11–19–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Clarification of Certain Procedures for Processing H–2A Labor Certification Applications Employment and Training Administration, Labor. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) is providing additional clarification to the procedures by which State Workforce Agencies and ETA National Processing Centers (NPC) process employer applications for H–2A temporary agricultural labor certification issued in the Training and Employment Guidance Letter (TEGL) No. 11–07 on November 6, 2007. These additional clarifications have been made under TEGL No. 11–07, Change 1, which is published below in order to inform the public. The clarifications and requirements stated in the TEGL take effect immediately. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: E:\FR\FM\20NON1.SGM 20NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 223 (Tuesday, November 20, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 65354-65355]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-22669]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Horner Collection, 
Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Horner 
Collection, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR that meet the 
definition of ``unassociated funerary objects'' under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal

[[Page 65355]]

agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park 
Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    The five cultural items are one antler tool; one nose ring or 
bracelet; one mortar and pestle; one jar of beads; and one bag of 
bells.
    The Museum of Oregon Country, Oregon Agricultural College was 
renamed the John B. Horner Museum of the Oregon Country in 1936, and 
became commonly known as the Horner Museum. The Oregon Agricultural 
College was renamed Oregon State College in 1937, and became Oregon 
State University in 1962. The Horner Museum closed in 1995. Currently, 
cultural items from the Horner Museum are referred to as the Horner 
Collection, which is owned by, and in the possession of, Oregon State 
University.
    Horner Collection, Oregon State University professional staff 
consulted with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, 
Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians of Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the 
Grand Ronde Community of Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Siletz 
Reservation, Oregon; Coquille Tribe of Oregon; and Santa Rosa Indian 
Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California.
    On March 17, 1929, V.P. Mitchell removed a ``horn implement'' from 
an unknown site near Yachats, OR. On December 21, 1933, V.P. Mitchell 
donated the antler horn implement to the museum and listed as part of 
the J. G. Crawford collection. Although the Horner Collection, Oregon 
State University has no documentation that the antler tool was ever 
buried with any individual, Mr. Crawford is known to have collected 
human remains and cultural items from burials and mounds.
    On December 21, 1933, V.P. Mitchell donated a nose ring or bracelet 
to the museum. Provenience records show that the item was in V.P. 
Mitchell's possession in 1929 and is listed as a ``Yachats Indian nose 
ring.'' On June 27, 2006, a representative of the Santa Rosa Indian 
Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California identified the item 
as a bracelet of a young lady or grandmother. On February 11, 2004, a 
representative of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, Oregon 
identified the cultural item as a funerary object from Yachats, OR.
    At an unknown date, cultural items were removed by Mrs. P. Mitchell 
from an unknown area near Yachats, OR. On April 13, 1968, Mrs. Mitchell 
donated one mortar and pestle, one jar of Indian beads, and one bag of 
bells, along with a human skull, to the museum. A deed of gift was 
submitted, which states ``Collection of Indian artifacts found near 
Yachats, OR.'' The Horner Collection, Oregon State University has no 
specific documentation that the cultural items were ever buried with 
any individual. However, with the inclusion of a human skull donated 
with the cultural items, the museum has identified them as unassociated 
funerary objects. The human remains are described in a previously 
published Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register of 
October 26, 2005 (FR Doc 05-21332, pages 61839-61840).
    All of the above cultural items were removed from undisclosed 
locations near Yachats, OR. According to a tribal representative for 
the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon, the Yachats 
area had large middens lining the lower Yachats River and nearby 
coastline. Large middens show the extensive time period of occupation 
of the Yachats area. The Yachats area was made part of the Siletz/Coast 
Reservation when it was established in 1855. This area was inhabited by 
the Alsea, Coos, Lower Umpqua, some South Slough and lower Coquille 
people, and some members of other tribes also confederated upon the 
Siletz Reservation. The Alsea people, as well as others that lived at 
Yachats, moved to the Siletz reservation in 1876. Descendants of tribes 
from the Yachats area are members of the Confederated Tribes of the 
Siletz Reservation, Oregon.
    Based on geographic, historic documents, museum and donor history, 
and consultation evidence, the Horner Collection, Oregon State 
University reasonably believe the cultural items to be unassociated 
funerary objects and culturally affiliated with the Confederated Tribes 
of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon.
    Officials of the Horner Collection, Oregon State University have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the five cultural 
items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with 
or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part 
of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of 
the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a 
Native American individual. Officials of the Horner Collection, Oregon 
State University also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 
(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be 
reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the 
Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should 
contact Sabah Randhawa, Executive Vice President and Provost, 
President's Office, Oregon State University, 600 Kerr Administration 
Building, Corvallis, OR 97331, telephone (541) 737-8260, before 
December 20, 2007. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to 
the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon may proceed 
after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Horner Collection, Oregon State University is responsible for 
notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw 
Indians of Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of 
Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon; Coquille 
Tribe of Oregon; and Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa 
Rancheria, California that this notice has been published.

    Dated: October 18, 2007.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E7-22669 Filed 11-19-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S