Recording of Major Repairs and Major Alterations, 53678-53680 [E7-18584]

Download as PDF 53678 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 182 / Thursday, September 20, 2007 / Rules and Regulations Attorney General may assign to them, immigration judges shall exercise the powers and duties delegated to them by the Act and by the Attorney General through regulation. In deciding the individual cases before them, and subject to the applicable governing standards, immigration judges shall exercise their independent judgment and discretion and may take any action consistent with their authorities under the Act and regulations that is appropriate and necessary for the disposition of such cases. Immigration judges shall administer oaths, receive evidence, and interrogate, examine, and cross-examine aliens and any witnesses. Subject to §§ 1003.35 and 1287.4 of this chapter, they may issue administrative subpoenas for the attendance of witnesses and the presentation of evidence. In all cases, immigration judges shall seek to resolve the questions before them in a timely and impartial manner consistent with the Act and regulations. (c) Review. Decisions of immigration judges are subject to review by the Board of Immigration Appeals in any case in which the Board has jurisdiction as provided in 8 CFR 1003.1. (d) Governing standards. Immigration judges shall be governed by the provisions and limitations prescribed by the Act and this chapter, by the decisions of the Board, and by the Attorney General (through review of a decision of the Board, by written order, or by determination and ruling pursuant to section 103 of the Act). 6. The authority citation for 8 CFR part 1240 continues to read as follows: I Authority: 8 U.S.C. 1103, 1182, 1186a, 1224, 1225, 1226, 1227, 1251, 1252 note, 1252a, 1252b, 1362; secs. 202 and 203, Pub. L. 105–100 (111 Stat. 2160, 2193); sec. 902, Pub. L. 105–277 (112 Stat. 2681); 8 CFR part 2. Subpart A—Removal Proceedings [Amended] 7. Amend § 1240.1 by removing the first and second sentences of paragraph (a)(2). rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with RULES I Dated: September 12, 2007. Alberto R. Gonzales, Attorney General. [FR Doc. E7–18526 Filed 9–19–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4410–30–P VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:42 Sep 19, 2007 Jkt 211001 Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 43 [Docket No. FAA–2007–28631; Amendment No. 43–41] RIN 2120–AJ11 Recording of Major Repairs and Major Alterations Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: SUMMARY: This action amends instructions to aviation maintenance providers regarding submittal of FAA Form 337, Major Repair and Alteration, for either major repair or major alteration; or for extended-range fuel tanks installed within the passenger compartment or a baggage compartment. This change clarifies the mailing instructions when submitting Form 337 to the FAA. The intent of this action is to amend the regulation to ensure mailing requirements are clear and accurate. This amendment becomes effective September 20, 2007. DATES: Kim Barnette, Aircraft Maintenance Division, Flight Standards Service, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591; telephone: (202–493–4922); facsimile: (202–267– 5115); e-mail: kim.a.barnette@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Authority for This Rulemaking PART 1240—PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES § 1240.1 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION The FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety is found in Title 49 of the United States Code. Subtitle I, Section 106 describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the agency’s authority. The FAA is issuing this rulemaking under the authority set forth in 49 U.S.C. 44701(a)(5). This regulation is within the scope of that authority because the Administrator is charged with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft by, among other things, prescribing regulations and minimum standards for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce and national security. Background On September 9, 1987, the FAA published a final rule entitled ‘‘Aircraft Identification and Retention of Fuel System Modification Records,’’ (52 FR PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 34096). Among other changes, this rule amended part 43, Appendix B, by revising the introductory text of paragraph (a) and adding a new paragraph (d). This rule provided instructions so major alterations for fuel tanks and system modifications would be segregated from other major repairs and alterations. The new paragraph (d) provided instructions for disposition of the Form 337, Major Repair and Alteration, whenever extended-range fuel tanks are installed within the passenger compartment or a baggage compartment. As part of those instructions, paragraph (c)(2) of Appendix B is referenced for distribution of Form 337. The FAA has found that since adding paragraph (d), there has been a decline in Form 337s received for extendedrange fuel tanks. Review of part 43, Appendix B revealed a wrong address. As currently written, paragraph (c)(2) directs individuals to send a copy of Form 337 to an incorrect address. Any FAA Form 337 that describes a modification to an aircraft fuel system or that shows additional tanks installed, should be mailed to the FAA, Aircraft Registration Branch, AFS–751, P.O. Box 25724, Oklahoma City, OK. All other FAA Form 337s should be mailed to the FAA, Aircraft Registration Branch, AFS–750, P.O. Box 25504, Oklahoma City, OK. The change in this final rule will clarify and correct the mailing instructions and does not affect any other requirements in part 43. Reason for Final Rule This final rule amends the mailing instructions for FAA Form 337 in part 43, Appendix B, paragraphs (c) and (d). The change will allow submission of FAA Form 337 to the correct address. The intent of this action is to amend the regulation to ensure that instructions for submitting this form are clear and accurate. Justification for Immediate Adoption Because the circumstances described herein warrant immediate action, the Administrator finds that notice and public comment under 5 U.S.C. 553(b) is impracticable and contrary to the public interest. Further, the Administrator finds that good cause exists under 5 U.S.C. 553(d) for making this rule effective in less than 30 days after publication in the Federal Register. The amendment ensures FAA’s commitment to the Anti Drug Abuse Act of 1988, Subtitle E, FAA Drug Enforcement Assistance Act of 1988. E:\FR\FM\20SER1.SGM 20SER1 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 182 / Thursday, September 20, 2007 / Rules and Regulations Paperwork Reduction Act Information collection requirements associated with this final rule have been previously approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. section 3507(d)), and have been assigned OMB Control Number 2120– 0020. An agency may not collect or sponsor the collection of information, nor may it impose an information collection requirement unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. International Compatibility The FAA has determined that a review of the Convention on International Civil Aviation Standards and Recommended Practices is not warranted because there is not a comparable rule under ICAO standards. rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with RULES Regulatory Evaluation, Regulatory Flexibility Determination, International Trade Impact Assessment, and Unfunded Mandates Assessment Changes to Federal regulations must undergo several economic analyses. First, Executive Order 12866 directs that each Federal agency shall propose or adopt a regulation only upon a reasoned determination that the benefits of the intended regulation justify its costs. Second, the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96–354) requires agencies to analyze the economic impact of regulatory changes on small entities. Third, the Trade Agreements Act (Pub. L. 96–39) prohibits agencies from setting standards that create unnecessary obstacles to the foreign commerce of the United States. In developing U.S. standards, the Trade Act requires agencies to consider international standards and, where appropriate, that they be the basis of U.S. standards. Fourth, the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Public Law 104–4) requires agencies to prepare a written assessment of the costs, benefits, and other effects of proposed or final rules that include a Federal mandate likely to result in the expenditure by State, local, or tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector, of $100 million or more annually (adjusted for inflation with base year of 1995). This portion of the preamble summarizes the FAA’s analysis of the economic impacts of this final rule. Department of Transportation Order DOT 2100.5 prescribes policies and procedures for simplification, analysis, and review of regulations. If the expected cost impact is so minimal that VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:42 Sep 19, 2007 Jkt 211001 53679 a proposed or final rule does not warrant a full evaluation, this order permits that a statement to that effect and the basis for it be included in the preamble if a full regulatory evaluation of the cost and benefits is not prepared. Such a determination has been made for this final rule. The reasoning for this determination follows: Since this final rule merely clarifies FAA procedures, the expected outcome will be a minimal impact with positive net benefits, and a regulatory evaluation was not prepared. FAA has, therefore, determined that this final rule is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ as defined in section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866, and is not ‘‘significant’’ as defined in DOT’s Regulatory Policies and Procedures. International Trade Impact Assessment Regulatory Flexibility Determination The Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96–354) (RFA) establishes ‘‘as a principle of regulatory issuance that agencies shall endeavor, consistent with the objectives of the rule and of applicable statutes, to fit regulatory and informational requirements to the scale of the businesses, organizations, and governmental jurisdictions subject to regulation. To achieve this principle, agencies are required to solicit and consider flexible regulatory proposals and to explain the rationale for their actions to assure that such proposals are given serious consideration.’’ The RFA covers a wide-range of small entities, including small businesses, not-forprofit organizations, and small governmental jurisdictions. Agencies must perform a review to determine whether a rule will have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. If the agency determines that it will, the agency must prepare a regulatory flexibility analysis as described in the RFA. However, if an agency determines that a rule is not expected to have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities, section 605(b) of the RFA provides that the head of the agency may so certify and a regulatory flexibility analysis is not required. The certification must include a statement providing the factual basis for this determination, and the reasoning should be clear. This final rule merely revises an incorrect mailing address; the expected outcome will have only a minimal impact on any small entity affected by this rulemaking action. Therefore, as the FAA Administrator, I certify that this rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. Unfunded Mandates Assessment PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 The Trade Agreements Act of 1979 (Pub. L. 96–39) prohibits Federal agencies from establishing any standards or engaging in related activities that create unnecessary obstacles to the foreign commerce of the United States. Legitimate domestic objectives, such as safety, are not considered unnecessary obstacles. The statute also requires consideration of international standards and, where appropriate, that they be the basis for U.S. standards. The FAA has assessed the potential effect of this final rule and has determined that it will respond to a domestic safety objective and not considered an unnecessary obstacle to trade. Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104–4) requires each Federal agency to prepare a written statement assessing the effects of any Federal mandate in a proposed or final agency rule that may result in an expenditure of $100 million or more (adjusted annually for inflation with the base year 1995) in any one year by State, local, and tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector; such a mandate is deemed to be a ‘‘significant regulatory action.’’ The FAA currently uses an inflation-adjusted value of $128.1 million in lieu of $100 million. This final rule does not contain such a mandate. Availability of Rulemaking Documents You can get an electronic copy of rulemaking documents using the Internet by— 1. Searching the Department of Transportation’s electronic Docket Management System (DMS) Web page (http://dms.dot.gov/search); 2. Visiting the FAA’s Regulations and Policies Web page at http:// www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/; or 3. Accessing the Government Printing Office’s Web page at http:// www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html. You can also get a copy by sending a request to the Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Rulemaking, ARM–1, 800 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20591, or by calling (202) 267–9680. Make sure to identify the amendment number or docket number of this rulemaking. Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all comments received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may E:\FR\FM\20SER1.SGM 20SER1 53680 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 182 / Thursday, September 20, 2007 / Rules and Regulations review DOT’s complete Privacy Act statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 70; Pages 19477–78) or you may visit http://dms.dot.gov. Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act The Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act (SBREFA) of 1996 requires FAA to comply with small entity requests for information or advice about compliance with statutes and regulations within its jurisdiction. If you are a small entity and you have a question regarding this document, you may contact your local FAA official, or the person listed under the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT heading at the beginning of the preamble. You can find out more about SBREFA on the Internet at http://www.faa.gov/ regulations_policies/rulemaking/ sbre_act/. In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation Administration amends part 43 of Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations as follows: I PART 43—MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND ALTERATIONS 1. The authority citation for part 43 continues to read as follows: I Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701, 44703, 44705, 44707, 44711, 44713, 44717, 44725. 2. Appendix B is amended by revising paragraphs (c) and (d) to read as follows: I Appendix B to Part 43—Recording of Major Repairs and Major Alterations rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with RULES * * * (c) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this appendix, for a major repair or major alteration made by a person authorized in § 43.17, the person who performs the major repair or major alteration and the person authorized by § 43.17 to approve that work shall execute an FAA Form 337 at least in duplicate. A completed copy of that form shall be— (1) Given to the aircraft owner; and (2) Forwarded to the Federal Aviation Administration, Aircraft Registration Branch, AFS–750, Post Office Box 25504, Oklahoma City, OK 73125, within 48 hours after the work is inspected. (d) For extended-range fuel tanks installed within the passenger compartment or a baggage compartment, the person who performs the work and the person authorized to approve the work by § 43.7 shall execute an FAA Form 337 in at least triplicate. A completed copy of that form shall be— VerDate Aug<31>2005 * * * * Issued in Washington, DC on August 27, 2007. James J. Ballough, Director, Flight Standards Service. [FR Doc. E7–18584 Filed 9–19–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 97 [Docket No. 30570; Amdt. No. 3236] Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: The Amendment * * Standard Instrument Approach Procedures; Miscellaneous Amendments List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 43 Aircraft, Aviation safety, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. * (1) Placed on board the aircraft as specified in § 91.417 of this chapter; (2) Given to the aircraft owner; and (3) Forwarded to the Federal Aviation Administration, Aircraft Registration Branch, AFS–751, Post Office Box 25724, Oklahoma City, OK 73125, within 48 hours after the work is inspected. 16:42 Sep 19, 2007 Jkt 211001 SUMMARY: This rule amends Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) for operations at certain airports. These regulatory actions are needed because of changes in the National Airspace System, such as the commissioning of new navigational facilities, adding of new obstacles, or changing air traffic requirements. These changes are designed to provide safe and efficient use of the navigable airspace and to promote safe flight operations under instrument flight rules at the affected airports. DATES: This rule is effective September 20, 2007. The compliance date for each SIAP is specified in the amendatory provisions. The incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in the regulations is approved by the Director of the Federal Register as of September 20, 2007. ADDRESSES: Availability of matter incorporated by reference in the amendment is as follows: For Examination— 1. FAA Rules Docket, FAA Headquarters Building, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591; 2. The FAA Regional Office of the region in which the affected airport is located; 3. The National Flight Procedures Office, 6500 South MacArthur Blvd., Oklahoma City, OK 73169 or, PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 4. The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202–741–6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/ federal_register/ code_of_federal_regulations/ ibr_locations.html. Availability—All SIAPs are available online free of charge. Visit nfdc.faa.gov to register. Additionally, individual SIAP and Takeoff Minimums and ODP copies may be obtained from: 1. FAA Public Inquiry Center (APA– 200), FAA Headquarters Building, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591; or 2. The FAA Regional Office of the region in which the affected airport is located. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Harry J. Hodges, Flight Procedure Standards Branch (AFS–420), Flight Technologies and Programs Division, Flight Standards Service, Federal Aviation Administration, Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center, 6500 South MacArthur Blvd., Oklahoma City, OK 73169 (Mail Address: P.O. Box 25082, Oklahoma City, OK 73125) telephone: (405) 954–4164. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This rule amends Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 97 (14 CFR part 97) by amending the referenced SIAPs. The complete regulatory description of each SIAP is listed on the appropriate FAA Form 8260, as modified by the National Flight Data Center (FDC)/Permanent Notice to Airmen (P–NOTAM), and is incorporated by reference in the amendment under 5 U.S.C. 552(a), 1 CFR part 51, and § 97.20 of Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The large number of SIAPs, their complex nature, and the need for a special format make their verbatim publication in the Federal Register expensive and impractical. Further, airmen do not use the regulatory text of the SIAPs, but refer to their graphic depiction on charts printed by publishers of aeronautical materials. Thus, the advantages of incorporation by reference are realized and publication of the complete description of each SIAP contained in FAA form documents is unnecessary. This amendment provides the affected CFR sections and specifies the types of SIAP and the corresponding effective dates. This amendment also identifies the airport and its location, the procedure and the amendment number. The Rule This amendment to 14 CFR part 97 is effective upon publication of each E:\FR\FM\20SER1.SGM 20SER1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 182 (Thursday, September 20, 2007)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 53678-53680]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-18584]


=======================================================================
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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 43

[Docket No. FAA-2007-28631; Amendment No. 43-41]
RIN 2120-AJ11


Recording of Major Repairs and Major Alterations

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This action amends instructions to aviation maintenance 
providers regarding submittal of FAA Form 337, Major Repair and 
Alteration, for either major repair or major alteration; or for 
extended-range fuel tanks installed within the passenger compartment or 
a baggage compartment. This change clarifies the mailing instructions 
when submitting Form 337 to the FAA. The intent of this action is to 
amend the regulation to ensure mailing requirements are clear and 
accurate.

DATES: This amendment becomes effective September 20, 2007.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kim Barnette, Aircraft Maintenance 
Division, Flight Standards Service, Federal Aviation Administration, 
800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591; telephone: (202-
493-4922); facsimile: (202-267-5115); e-mail: kim.a.barnette@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Authority for This Rulemaking

    The FAA's authority to issue rules on aviation safety is found in 
Title 49 of the United States Code. Subtitle I, Section 106 describes 
the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation 
Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the agency's authority.
    The FAA is issuing this rulemaking under the authority set forth in 
49 U.S.C. 44701(a)(5). This regulation is within the scope of that 
authority because the Administrator is charged with promoting safe 
flight of civil aircraft by, among other things, prescribing 
regulations and minimum standards for practices, methods, and 
procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce 
and national security.

Background

    On September 9, 1987, the FAA published a final rule entitled 
``Aircraft Identification and Retention of Fuel System Modification 
Records,'' (52 FR 34096). Among other changes, this rule amended part 
43, Appendix B, by revising the introductory text of paragraph (a) and 
adding a new paragraph (d). This rule provided instructions so major 
alterations for fuel tanks and system modifications would be segregated 
from other major repairs and alterations.
    The new paragraph (d) provided instructions for disposition of the 
Form 337, Major Repair and Alteration, whenever extended-range fuel 
tanks are installed within the passenger compartment or a baggage 
compartment. As part of those instructions, paragraph (c)(2) of 
Appendix B is referenced for distribution of Form 337.
    The FAA has found that since adding paragraph (d), there has been a 
decline in Form 337s received for extended-range fuel tanks. Review of 
part 43, Appendix B revealed a wrong address. As currently written, 
paragraph (c)(2) directs individuals to send a copy of Form 337 to an 
incorrect address. Any FAA Form 337 that describes a modification to an 
aircraft fuel system or that shows additional tanks installed, should 
be mailed to the FAA, Aircraft Registration Branch, AFS-751, P.O. Box 
25724, Oklahoma City, OK. All other FAA Form 337s should be mailed to 
the FAA, Aircraft Registration Branch, AFS-750, P.O. Box 25504, 
Oklahoma City, OK.
    The change in this final rule will clarify and correct the mailing 
instructions and does not affect any other requirements in part 43.

Reason for Final Rule

    This final rule amends the mailing instructions for FAA Form 337 in 
part 43, Appendix B, paragraphs (c) and (d). The change will allow 
submission of FAA Form 337 to the correct address. The intent of this 
action is to amend the regulation to ensure that instructions for 
submitting this form are clear and accurate.

Justification for Immediate Adoption

    Because the circumstances described herein warrant immediate 
action, the Administrator finds that notice and public comment under 5 
U.S.C. 553(b) is impracticable and contrary to the public interest. 
Further, the Administrator finds that good cause exists under 5 U.S.C. 
553(d) for making this rule effective in less than 30 days after 
publication in the Federal Register. The amendment ensures FAA's 
commitment to the Anti Drug Abuse Act of 1988, Subtitle E, FAA Drug 
Enforcement Assistance Act of 1988.

[[Page 53679]]

Paperwork Reduction Act

    Information collection requirements associated with this final rule 
have been previously approved by the Office of Management and Budget 
(OMB) under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 
U.S.C. section 3507(d)), and have been assigned OMB Control Number 
2120-0020.
    An agency may not collect or sponsor the collection of information, 
nor may it impose an information collection requirement unless it 
displays a currently valid OMB control number.

International Compatibility

    The FAA has determined that a review of the Convention on 
International Civil Aviation Standards and Recommended Practices is not 
warranted because there is not a comparable rule under ICAO standards.

Regulatory Evaluation, Regulatory Flexibility Determination, 
International Trade Impact Assessment, and Unfunded Mandates Assessment

    Changes to Federal regulations must undergo several economic 
analyses. First, Executive Order 12866 directs that each Federal agency 
shall propose or adopt a regulation only upon a reasoned determination 
that the benefits of the intended regulation justify its costs. Second, 
the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-354) requires 
agencies to analyze the economic impact of regulatory changes on small 
entities. Third, the Trade Agreements Act (Pub. L. 96-39) prohibits 
agencies from setting standards that create unnecessary obstacles to 
the foreign commerce of the United States. In developing U.S. 
standards, the Trade Act requires agencies to consider international 
standards and, where appropriate, that they be the basis of U.S. 
standards. Fourth, the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Public Law 
104-4) requires agencies to prepare a written assessment of the costs, 
benefits, and other effects of proposed or final rules that include a 
Federal mandate likely to result in the expenditure by State, local, or 
tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector, of $100 
million or more annually (adjusted for inflation with base year of 
1995). This portion of the preamble summarizes the FAA's analysis of 
the economic impacts of this final rule.
    Department of Transportation Order DOT 2100.5 prescribes policies 
and procedures for simplification, analysis, and review of regulations. 
If the expected cost impact is so minimal that a proposed or final rule 
does not warrant a full evaluation, this order permits that a statement 
to that effect and the basis for it be included in the preamble if a 
full regulatory evaluation of the cost and benefits is not prepared. 
Such a determination has been made for this final rule. The reasoning 
for this determination follows:
    Since this final rule merely clarifies FAA procedures, the expected 
outcome will be a minimal impact with positive net benefits, and a 
regulatory evaluation was not prepared. FAA has, therefore, determined 
that this final rule is not a ``significant regulatory action'' as 
defined in section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866, and is not 
``significant'' as defined in DOT's Regulatory Policies and Procedures.

Regulatory Flexibility Determination

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-354) (RFA) 
establishes ``as a principle of regulatory issuance that agencies shall 
endeavor, consistent with the objectives of the rule and of applicable 
statutes, to fit regulatory and informational requirements to the scale 
of the businesses, organizations, and governmental jurisdictions 
subject to regulation. To achieve this principle, agencies are required 
to solicit and consider flexible regulatory proposals and to explain 
the rationale for their actions to assure that such proposals are given 
serious consideration.'' The RFA covers a wide-range of small entities, 
including small businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and small 
governmental jurisdictions.
    Agencies must perform a review to determine whether a rule will 
have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities. If the agency determines that it will, the agency must 
prepare a regulatory flexibility analysis as described in the RFA.
    However, if an agency determines that a rule is not expected to 
have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities, section 605(b) of the RFA provides that the head of the 
agency may so certify and a regulatory flexibility analysis is not 
required. The certification must include a statement providing the 
factual basis for this determination, and the reasoning should be 
clear.
    This final rule merely revises an incorrect mailing address; the 
expected outcome will have only a minimal impact on any small entity 
affected by this rulemaking action. Therefore, as the FAA 
Administrator, I certify that this rule will not have a significant 
economic impact on a substantial number of small entities.

International Trade Impact Assessment

    The Trade Agreements Act of 1979 (Pub. L. 96-39) prohibits Federal 
agencies from establishing any standards or engaging in related 
activities that create unnecessary obstacles to the foreign commerce of 
the United States. Legitimate domestic objectives, such as safety, are 
not considered unnecessary obstacles. The statute also requires 
consideration of international standards and, where appropriate, that 
they be the basis for U.S. standards. The FAA has assessed the 
potential effect of this final rule and has determined that it will 
respond to a domestic safety objective and not considered an 
unnecessary obstacle to trade.

Unfunded Mandates Assessment

    Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-
4) requires each Federal agency to prepare a written statement 
assessing the effects of any Federal mandate in a proposed or final 
agency rule that may result in an expenditure of $100 million or more 
(adjusted annually for inflation with the base year 1995) in any one 
year by State, local, and tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by 
the private sector; such a mandate is deemed to be a ``significant 
regulatory action.'' The FAA currently uses an inflation-adjusted value 
of $128.1 million in lieu of $100 million.
    This final rule does not contain such a mandate.

Availability of Rulemaking Documents

    You can get an electronic copy of rulemaking documents using the 
Internet by--
    1. Searching the Department of Transportation's electronic Docket 
Management System (DMS) Web page (http://dms.dot.gov/search);
    2. Visiting the FAA's Regulations and Policies Web page at http://
www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/; or
    3. Accessing the Government Printing Office's Web page at http://
www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html.
    You can also get a copy by sending a request to the Federal 
Aviation Administration, Office of Rulemaking, ARM-1, 800 Independence 
Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20591, or by calling (202) 267-9680. Make 
sure to identify the amendment number or docket number of this 
rulemaking.
    Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all comments 
received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual 
submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf 
of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may

[[Page 53680]]

review DOT's complete Privacy Act statement in the Federal Register 
published on April 11, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 70; Pages 19477-78) or 
you may visit http://dms.dot.gov.

Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act

    The Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act (SBREFA) of 
1996 requires FAA to comply with small entity requests for information 
or advice about compliance with statutes and regulations within its 
jurisdiction. If you are a small entity and you have a question 
regarding this document, you may contact your local FAA official, or 
the person listed under the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT heading at 
the beginning of the preamble. You can find out more about SBREFA on 
the Internet at http://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/rulemaking/
sbre_act/.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 43

    Aircraft, Aviation safety, Reporting and recordkeeping 
requirements.

The Amendment

0
In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation Administration 
amends part 43 of Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations as follows:

PART 43--MAINTENANCE, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, REBUILDING, AND 
ALTERATIONS

0
1. The authority citation for part 43 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701, 44703, 44705, 44707, 
44711, 44713, 44717, 44725.

0
2. Appendix B is amended by revising paragraphs (c) and (d) to read as 
follows:

Appendix B to Part 43--Recording of Major Repairs and Major Alterations

* * * * *
    (c) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this appendix, for a 
major repair or major alteration made by a person authorized in 
Sec.  43.17, the person who performs the major repair or major 
alteration and the person authorized by Sec.  43.17 to approve that 
work shall execute an FAA Form 337 at least in duplicate. A 
completed copy of that form shall be--
    (1) Given to the aircraft owner; and
    (2) Forwarded to the Federal Aviation Administration, Aircraft 
Registration Branch, AFS-750, Post Office Box 25504, Oklahoma City, 
OK 73125, within 48 hours after the work is inspected.
    (d) For extended-range fuel tanks installed within the passenger 
compartment or a baggage compartment, the person who performs the 
work and the person authorized to approve the work by Sec.  43.7 
shall execute an FAA Form 337 in at least triplicate. A completed 
copy of that form shall be--
    (1) Placed on board the aircraft as specified in Sec.  91.417 of 
this chapter;
    (2) Given to the aircraft owner; and
    (3) Forwarded to the Federal Aviation Administration, Aircraft 
Registration Branch, AFS-751, Post Office Box 25724, Oklahoma City, 
OK 73125, within 48 hours after the work is inspected.
* * * * *

    Issued in Washington, DC on August 27, 2007.
James J. Ballough,
Director, Flight Standards Service. 10
 [FR Doc. E7-18584 Filed 9-19-07; 8:45 am]
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