Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA, 53600-53601 [E7-18481]

Download as PDF rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with NOTICES 53600 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 181 / Wednesday, September 19, 2007 / Notices ‘‘objects of cultural patrimony’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. The two cultural items are a ceremonial wooden bowl (KSHS catalog number 56.32.12) and a woven bag (KSHS catalog number 56.32.39). On April 23, 1956, the cultural items were sold to the Kansas State Historical Society by the Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit College, Beloit, WI. Both cultural items were from the Heath Collection and identified as Ottawa. The Ottawa people are also called Odawa. Albert Green Heath was known to have collected cultural items from the Odawa at Little Traverse Bay, MI. Descendants of the Ottawa or Odawa are members of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan. Tribal representatives of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan have identified the two cultural items as being needed by traditional Odawa religious leaders for the practice of a traditional Native American religion by their present–day adherents. Furthermore, tribal representatives also have identified the two cultural items as having ongoing historical, traditional, and cultural importance central to the culture itself, and indicated that the cultural items could not have been alienated by any single individual. Officials of the Kansas State Historical Society have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(C), the two cultural items described above are specific ceremonial objects needed by traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by their present–day adherents. Officials of the Kansas State Historical Society also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(D), the two cultural items described above have ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. Lastly, officials of the Kansas State Historical Society have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred objects/objects of cultural patrimony VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:58 Sep 18, 2007 Jkt 211001 and the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the sacred objects/objects of cultural patrimony should contact Robert Hoard, NAGPRA Coordinator, Kansas State Historical Society, 6425 SW Sixth Avenue, Topeka, KS 66542, telephone (785) 272–8681 (extension 269), before October 19, 2007. Repatriation of the sacred objects/ objects of cultural patrimony to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Kansas State Historical Society is responsible for notifying the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan tribe that this notice has been published. Dated: September 5, 2007. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–18484 Filed 9–18–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA. The human remains were removed from Siskiyou County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound professional staff and a consultant in consultation with representatives of the Klamath Tribes, Oregon and Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma. In 1925, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 removed from near Lower Klamath Lake, Siskiyou County, CA, by Stanley G. Jewett. Mr. Jewett donated the human remains to the museum in 1955. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In July 1925, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Tule Lake, Siskiyou County, CA, by Mr. Jewett. Mr. Jewett donated the human remains to museum in 1955. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The individuals are most likely of Native American ancestry as indicated by morphological features. The geographical location where the human remains were recovered is consistent with the historically documented territory of the Klamath tribes. The Klamath Tribes, Oregon and Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma have a shared ancestry. Following the conclusion of the Modoc wars, the Modoc people were relocated to Oklahoma. In 1888, the Modoc reservation was established. In 1909, the Modoc were granted permission to return to Oregon. Those who returned became part of the Klamath Tribes, Oregon. The Klamath Tribes, Oregon and Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma have formally agreed that repatriations of human remains from the historically documented territory of the Klamath tribes should go to the Klamath Tribes, Oregon for reburial. Based on provenience, historical documentation, and tribal consultation, officials of the Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound reasonably believe that the human remains share a common ancestry with members of the Klamath and Modoc tribes. Descendants of the Klamath and Modoc tribes are members of the Klamath Tribes, Oregon and Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma. Officials of the Slater Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Slater Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Klamath Tribes, Oregon and the Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Peter Wimberger, Slater Museum of Natural History, 1500 N. Warner, Tacoma, WA 98416, (253) 879–2784, before October 19, 2007. E:\FR\FM\19SEN1.SGM 19SEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 181 / Wednesday, September 19, 2007 / Notices Repatriation of the human remains to the Klamath Tribes, Oregon may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound is responsible for notifying the Klamath Tribes, Oregon and Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: August 29, 2007. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–18481 Filed 9–18–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA. The human remains were removed from Hood River, Hood River County, OR. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound professional staff and a consultant in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon and Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington. Human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from Hood River, Hood River County, OR, by an unknown person on an unknown date. The human remains were brought to the museum by Howard Richardson on February 7, 1939. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The individuals are most likely of Native American ancestry as indicated VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:58 Sep 18, 2007 Jkt 211001 by morphological features. The geographical location where the human remains were recovered is consistent with the historically documented territory of the tribes now represented by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. The Indian Claims Commission Final Decision places Hood River within the territories of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. Furthermore, based on information provided during consultation with tribal representatives, there is a reasonable belief that the human remains share a common ancestry with members of tribes now represented by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. Officials of the Slater Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Slater Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Peter Wimberger, Slater Museum of Natural History, 1500 N. Warner, Tacoma, WA 98416, (253) 879–2784, before October 19, 2007. Repatriation of the human remains to the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Slater Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon and Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington that this notice has been published. Dated: August 29, 2007. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–18482 Filed 9–18–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 53601 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Douglas and Kittitas Counties, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Burke Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon; Nez Perce Tribe of Idaho; and Wanapum Band, a non–federally recognized Indian group. In 1920, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from ‘‘the Vulcan Burial,’’ also designated as the ‘‘Hall Site #9,’’ in the area surrounding Vulcan (the vicinity of 45–DO–6) in either Douglas or Kittitas County, WA, during a museum expedition led by F. S. Hall. The human remains were accessioned by the Burke Museum in 1920 (Burke Accn. #1860). No known individual was identified. The 15 associated funerary objects are 1 lot of ochre, 1 lot of shell beads, 1 lot of stone beads, 1 lot of abalone shell fragments, 1 lot of burned organic material, 1 lot of shell beads, 1 utilized flake, 2 modified bone fragments, 1 turquoise pendant, and 5 coprolites. In 1921, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were E:\FR\FM\19SEN1.SGM 19SEN1

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[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 181 (Wednesday, September 19, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 53600-53601]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-18481]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, 
University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, 
WA. The human remains were removed from Siskiyou County, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Slater 
Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound professional staff 
and a consultant in consultation with representatives of the Klamath 
Tribes, Oregon and Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma.
    In 1925, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were removed from near Lower Klamath Lake, Siskiyou County, CA, by 
Stanley G. Jewett. Mr. Jewett donated the human remains to the museum 
in 1955. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In July 1925, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from Tule Lake, Siskiyou County, CA, by Mr. 
Jewett. Mr. Jewett donated the human remains to museum in 1955. No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    The individuals are most likely of Native American ancestry as 
indicated by morphological features. The geographical location where 
the human remains were recovered is consistent with the historically 
documented territory of the Klamath tribes. The Klamath Tribes, Oregon 
and Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma have a shared ancestry. Following the 
conclusion of the Modoc wars, the Modoc people were relocated to 
Oklahoma. In 1888, the Modoc reservation was established. In 1909, the 
Modoc were granted permission to return to Oregon. Those who returned 
became part of the Klamath Tribes, Oregon. The Klamath Tribes, Oregon 
and Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma have formally agreed that repatriations of 
human remains from the historically documented territory of the Klamath 
tribes should go to the Klamath Tribes, Oregon for reburial.
    Based on provenience, historical documentation, and tribal 
consultation, officials of the Slater Museum of Natural History, 
University of Puget Sound reasonably believe that the human remains 
share a common ancestry with members of the Klamath and Modoc tribes. 
Descendants of the Klamath and Modoc tribes are members of the Klamath 
Tribes, Oregon and Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma.
    Officials of the Slater Museum of Natural History have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the Slater Museum of Natural History 
also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the Native American human remains and the Klamath Tribes, 
Oregon and the Modoc Tribe of Oklahoma.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. 
Peter Wimberger, Slater Museum of Natural History, 1500 N. Warner, 
Tacoma, WA 98416, (253) 879-2784, before October 19, 2007.

[[Page 53601]]

Repatriation of the human remains to the Klamath Tribes, Oregon may 
proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound is 
responsible for notifying the Klamath Tribes, Oregon and Modoc Tribe of 
Oklahoma that this notice has been published.

    Dated: August 29, 2007.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E7-18481 Filed 9-18-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S