Addition of San Antonio International Airport to List of Designated Landing Locations for Certain Aircraft, 51730-51732 [E7-17802]

Download as PDF 51730 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 175 / Tuesday, September 11, 2007 / Proposed Rules one billing cycle. Appropriate e-mail notification of a charge reversal, however, may be just as fast and reliable as providing notice by first class mail. It may be appropriate, therefore, for the Rule to allow merchants increased flexibility in choosing the means by which they transmit cash refunds or notify consumers of charge reversals. The FTC could accomplish this change by replacing the words ‘‘first class mail’’ with the words ‘‘by any means at least as fast and reliable as first class mail’’ in Sections 435.2(f)(1) and (2). This would make it clear to merchants that they could use other means, such as private courier or electronic transfer, to provide refunds as long as the means are at least as fast and reliable as first class mail. The Commission has no basis for believing that such changes would affect current industry compliance practice. III. Possible Renumbering To comport with recent rules and to make the Rule easier to navigate, the Commission may prefer to organize the Rule by placing its definitions first, followed by the Rule’s substance. Additionally, the Commission may prefer to organize its definitions alphabetically. If the Commission decides to retain the Rule, it may propose, therefore, to reverse and renumber Sections 435.1 and 435.2, and array each of the terms defined in alphabetical order. IV. Regulatory Review Program The Commission has determined to review all current Commission rules and guides periodically. These reviews seek information about the costs and benefits of the Commission’s rules and guides and their regulatory and economic impact. The information obtained assists the Commission in identifying rules and guides that warrant modification or rescission. Therefore, the Commission solicits comment on, among other things, the economic impact of the Mail or Telephone Order Merchandise Rule; possible conflict between the Rule and state, local, or federal laws; and the effect on the Rule of any technological, economic, or other industry changes. yshivers on PROD1PC62 with PROPOSALS V. Request For Comment The Commission solicits written public comment on the following questions: (1) Is there a continuing need for the Rule as currently promulgated? (2) What costs has the Rule imposed on, and what benefits has the Rule provided to, purchasers of merchandise ordered by mail or telephone? VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:47 Sep 10, 2007 Jkt 211001 (3) In what respects has the Rule affected the operation of third-party dispute mediation agencies such as the Better Business Bureau (hereafter, ‘‘mediation agencies’’), or state law enforcement agencies? (4) What costs or benefits would amending the Rule explicitly to cover all computer and Internet orders impose on or provide to consumers, merchants, mediation agencies, or state law enforcement agencies? If the Commission decides to propose such a change, how should it revise the text of the Rule? (5) What costs or benefits would amending the Rule to refer to payment by means other than cash, check, money order, or credit card impose on or provide to merchants, consumers, mediation agencies, or state law enforcement agencies? If the Commission decides to propose such a change, how should it revise the text of the Rule? Should the text provide an expanded list of payment methods, general classifications of payment methods (such as credit card vs. all other methods), or some other alternative? (6) What costs or benefits would amending the Rule to permit Rulerequired refunds or notices of charge reversals by means at least as fast and reliable as first class mail impose on or provide to merchants, consumers, mediation agencies, or state law enforcement agencies? (7) What changes, if any, should the FTC make to the Rule to increase the benefits of the Rule to purchasers? How would these changes affect the costs the Rule imposes on firms subject to its requirements? How would these changes affect the benefits to purchasers? (8) What burdens or costs, including costs of compliance, has the Rule imposed on firms subject to its requirements? Has the Rule provided benefits to such firms? If so, what benefits? (9) What changes, if any, should the FTC make to the Rule to reduce the burdens or costs imposed on firms subject to its requirements? How would these changes affect the benefits provided by the Rule? (10) How could any of the changes suggested in Part II of this notice be modified to reduce the burdens or costs imposed on firms subject to its requirements? How would these modifications affect the benefits provided to merchants, consumers, mediation agencies, or state law enforcement agencies? PO 00000 Frm 00012 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 (11) Does the Rule overlap or conflict with other federal, state, or local laws or regulations? (12) Would any of the changes to the Rule suggested in Part II of this notice overlap or conflict with other federal, state, or local laws or regulations? (13) Since the FTC issued the Rule in its current form, what effects, if any, have changes in relevant technology, commercial practices or economic conditions had on the Rule? To what extent would the changes to the Rule suggested in Part II of this notice accommodate these changes? (14) To what extent are the changes discussed in Part II of this notice either substantive or non-substantive? (15) Should the Commission make any of the changes suggested in Part III of this notice? VI. Communications by Outside Parties to Commissioners or Their Advisors Written communications and summaries or transcripts of oral communications respecting the merits of this proceeding from any outside party to any Commissioner or Commissioner’s advisor will be placed on the public record. See 16 CFR 1.26(b)(5). List of Subjects in 16 CFR Part 435 Mail order merchandise, Telephone order merchandise, Trade practices. Authority: 15 U.S.C. 41–58. By direction of the Commission. Donald S. Clark Secretary [FR Doc. E7–17778 Filed 9–10–07: 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6750–01–S DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Bureau of Customs and Border Protection 19 CFR Part 122 [USCBP–2007–0017] Addition of San Antonio International Airport to List of Designated Landing Locations for Certain Aircraft Customs and Border Protection; Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Proposed rule. AGENCY: SUMMARY: This document proposes to amend the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Regulations by adding the San Antonio International Airport (SAT), located in San Antonio, Texas, to the list of designated airports at which E:\FR\FM\11SEP1.SGM 11SEP1 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 175 / Tuesday, September 11, 2007 / Proposed Rules yshivers on PROD1PC62 with PROPOSALS certain aircraft arriving in the continental United States from certain areas south of the United States must land for CBP processing. This proposed amendment is made to improve the effectiveness of CBP enforcement efforts to combat the smuggling of contraband by air into the United States from the south. DATES: Comments must be received on or before November 13, 2007. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by docket number, by one of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: http:// www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments via docket number USCBP–2007–0017. • Mail: Border Security Regulations Branch, Office of Regulations and Rulings, Customs and Border Protection, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., (Mint Annex), Washington, DC 20229. Instructions: All submissions received must include the agency name and docket number for this rulemaking. All comments received will be posted without change to http:// www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. For detailed instructions on submitting comments and additional information on the rulemaking process, see the ‘‘Public Participation’’ heading of the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of this document. Docket: For access to the docket to read background documents or comments received, go to http:// www.regulations.gov. Submitted comments may also be inspected during regular business days between the hours of 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. at the Office of Regulations and Rulings, Customs and Border Protection, 799 9th Street, NW., 5th Floor, Washington, DC. Arrangements to inspect submitted comments should be made in advance by calling Mr. Joseph Clark at (202) 572– 8768. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Fred Ramos, Program Manager, Traveler Security and Facilitation, Office of Field Operations, Customs and Border Protection at (202) 344–3726. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Public Participation Interested persons are invited to participate in this rulemaking by submitting written data, views, or arguments on all aspects of the proposed rule. CBP also invites comments that relate to the economic, environmental, or federalism affects that might result from this proposed rule. Comments that will provide the most assistance to CBP will reference a VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:47 Sep 10, 2007 Jkt 211001 specific portion of the proposed rule, explain the reason for any recommended change, and include data, information, or authority that support such recommended change. Background As part of CBP’s efforts to combat drug-smuggling activities, CBP air commerce regulations were amended in 1975 by Treasury Decision (T.D.) 75– 201, to impose special reporting requirements and control procedures on certain aircraft arriving in the continental United States via the U.S./ Mexican border, the Pacific Coast, the Gulf of Mexico, or the Atlantic Coast from certain locations in the southern portion of the Western Hemisphere. These special reporting requirements apply to all aircraft except the following: Public aircraft; those aircraft operated on a regularly published schedule, pursuant to a certificate of public convenience and necessity or foreign aircraft permit issued by the Department of Transportation authorizing interstate, overseas air transportation; and those aircraft with a seating capacity of more than 30 passengers or a maximum payload capacity of more than 7,500 pounds which are engaged in air transportation for compensation or hire on demand (see 19 CFR 122.23(a)). Thus, since 1975, commanders of such aircraft have been required to furnish CBP with timely notice of their intended arrival, and required to land at the nearest airport to the point of crossing designated by CBP for processing. Specifically, the regulations (19 CFR 122.23) provide that subject aircraft arriving in the continental United States from certain areas south of the United States must furnish a notice of intended arrival to the designated airport located nearest the point of crossing. Section 122.24(b) (19 CFR 122.24(b)) provides that, unless exempt, such aircraft must land at designated airports for CBP processing and delineates the airports designated for reporting and processing purposes for these aircraft. During the previous six years, aircraft subject to the special reporting requirements entering the United States from the specified foreign areas at a point of crossing near San Antonio, were required to land at San Antonio International Airport (SAT) for processing by CBP. These international flights have been arriving at SAT since November 2000, when SAT was temporarily designated as an airport where aircraft arriving from certain southern areas could land pursuant to section 1453 of the Tariff Suspension and Trade Act of 2000 (Pub. L. 106–476, PO 00000 Frm 00013 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 51731 Nov. 9, 2000). The Miscellaneous Trade and Technical Corrections Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108–429, Dec. 3, 2004) effectively extended the airport’s designation through November 9, 2006. This statutory designation has now expired. Community officials from San Antonio, Texas and the surrounding region have written CBP requesting that SAT be designated by regulation as an airport where aircraft arriving from certain southern areas must land. During the six years that SAT has been statutorily designated as an airport at which these aircraft arriving from the south may land for customs processing, CBP has reported no incidents or problems arising from this designation. Such a designation will impose no additional burdens on CBP as CBP already has a significant presence at SAT, processing international passengers arriving on scheduled commercial airliners as a landing rights airport. These same CBP personnel have been processing passengers arriving from the south since SAT was temporarily designated as an airport where aircraft arriving from the south could land pursuant to the Tariff Suspension and Trade Act of 2000. SAT provides facilities and security and law enforcement support services, at no charge to CBP, to assist in the processing of aircraft. Consequently, by this document CBP is proposing to permanently designate SAT as an airport where certain aircraft, arriving in the United States from south of the United States, are authorized to land for CBP processing. Proposed Amendment to Regulations If the proposed airport designation is adopted, the list of designated airports, at which certain aircraft arriving in the continental United States from certain areas south of the United States must land for CBP processing, at 19 CFR 122.24(b), will be amended to include San Antonio International Airport, located in San Antonio, Texas. Authority This change is proposed under the authority of 5 U.S.C. 301, 19 U.S.C. 1433(d), 1644a, and 1624, and the Homeland Security Act of 2002, Public Law 107–296 (November 25, 2002). Signing Authority This amendment to the regulations is being issued in accordance with 19 CFR 0.2(a) pertaining to the authority of the Secretary of Homeland Security (or his or her delegate) to prescribe regulations not related to customs revenue functions. E:\FR\FM\11SEP1.SGM 11SEP1 51732 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 175 / Tuesday, September 11, 2007 / Proposed Rules The Regulatory Flexibility Act and Executive Order 12866 This proposed amendment seeks to expand the list of designated airports at which certain aircraft may land for customs processing. As described in this document, certain international flights have been arriving at SAT, pursuant to statute, from November 2000, through November 9, 2006. The expansion of the list of designated airports to include SAT will not result in any new impact on affected parties but will result in a continuation of the previous situation. Therefore, CBP certifies that the proposed rule will not have significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. Accordingly, the document is not subject to the regulatory analysis or other requirements of 5 U.S.C. 603 and 604 of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.). The Office of Management and Budget has determined that this regulatory proposal is not a significant regulatory action as defined under Executive Order 12866. Dated: September 4, 2007. Michael Chertoff, Secretary. [FR Doc. E7–17802 Filed 9–10–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–14–P DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau Trade Group regarding the presentation of certain information on wine labels. DATES: Comments must be received on or before November 13, 2007. ADDRESSES: You may send comments on this notice to one of the following addresses: • http://www.regulations.gov (Federal e-rulemaking portal; follow the instructions for submitting comments); or • Director, Regulations and Rulings Division, Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, P.O. Box 14412, Washington, DC 20044–4412. See the Public Participation section of this notice for specific instructions and requirements for submitting comments, and for information on how to request a public hearing. You may view copies of this notice and any comments we receive about this proposal at http://www.regulations.gov. You also may view copies of this notice and any comments we receive about this proposal by appointment at the TTB Information Resource Center, 1310 G Street, NW., Washington, DC 20220. To make an appointment, call 202–927– 2400. Mari A. Kirrane, Wine Trade and Technical Advisor, Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, 221 Main Street, Suite 1340, San Francisco, CA 94105; telephone (415) 625–5793. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Background 27 CFR Parts 4, 5, and 7 TTB Authority [Notice No. 74] Section 105(e) of the Federal Alcohol Administration Act (FAA Act), 27 U.S.C. 205(e), authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to prescribe regulations for the labeling of wine, distilled spirits, and malt beverages. The FAA Act provides that these regulations should, among other things, prohibit consumer deception and the use of misleading statements on labels, and ensure that labels provide the consumer with adequate information as to the identity and quality of the product. The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) administers the regulations promulgated under the FAA Act. RIN 1513–AB36 Modification of Mandatory Label Information for Wine, Distilled Spirits, and Malt Beverages Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, Treasury. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking; solicitation of comments. AGENCY: In this notice, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) proposes to amend its regulations regarding the mandatory labeling requirements for alcoholic beverages. The proposed regulatory changes would permit alcohol content to appear on other labels affixed to the container rather than on the brand label as currently required. These regulatory changes will provide greater flexibility in alcoholic beverage labeling, and will conform the TTB wine labeling regulations to the recent agreement reached by members of the World Wine yshivers on PROD1PC62 with PROPOSALS SUMMARY: VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:47 Sep 10, 2007 Jkt 211001 Current TTB Mandatory Brand Labeling Requirements for Wine Part 4 of the TTB regulations (27 CFR part 4) sets forth the requirements for labeling and advertising wine promulgated under the FAA Act. Section 4.10 (27 CFR 4.10) defines a brand label as the label carrying, in the usual distinctive design, the brand name of the wine. Section 4.32 (27 CFR 4.32) PO 00000 Frm 00014 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 prescribes mandatory label information. Section 4.32(a) requires a statement of the following on the brand label: • The brand name, in accordance with § 4.33; • The class, type, or other designation, in accordance with § 4.34; • The alcohol content, in accordance with § 4.36; and • On blends consisting of American and foreign wines, if any reference is made to the presence of foreign wine, the exact percentage by volume. In addition, § 4.32(b) lists other mandatory label information, which may appear on any label affixed to the container. Current TTB Mandatory Brand Labeling Requirements for Distilled Spirits Part 5 of the TTB regulations (27 CFR part 5) sets forth the requirements for labeling and advertising distilled spirits promulgated under the FAA Act. Section 5.11 (27 CFR 5.11) defines a brand label as the principal display panel that is most likely to be displayed, presented, shown, or examined under normal and customary conditions of display for retail sale, and any other label appearing on the same side of the bottle as the principal display panel. The principal display panel appearing on a cylindrical surface is that 40 percent of the circumference which is most likely to be displayed, presented, shown, or examined under normal and customary conditions of display for retail sale. Section 5.32 (27 CFR 5.32) prescribes mandatory label information. Section 5.32(a) requires a statement of the following on the brand label: • The brand name; • The class and type, in accordance with § 5.35; and • The alcohol content, in accordance with § 5.37. In addition, § 5.32(b) lists the mandatory label information that must appear on either the brand label or the back label, including net contents and the country of origin of imported spirits. Current TTB Mandatory Brand Labeling Requirements for Malt Beverages Part 7 of the TTB regulations (27 CFR part 7) sets forth the requirements for labeling and advertising malt beverages promulgated under the FAA Act. Section 7.10 (27 CFR 7.10) defines a brand label as the label carrying, in the usual distinctive design, the brand name of the malt beverage. Section 7.22 (27 CFR 7.22) prescribes mandatory label information. Section 7.22(a) requires a statement of the following on the brand label: • The brand name, in accordance with § 7.23; E:\FR\FM\11SEP1.SGM 11SEP1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 175 (Tuesday, September 11, 2007)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 51730-51732]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-17802]


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DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

Bureau of Customs and Border Protection

19 CFR Part 122

[USCBP-2007-0017]


Addition of San Antonio International Airport to List of 
Designated Landing Locations for Certain Aircraft

AGENCY: Customs and Border Protection; Department of Homeland Security.

ACTION: Proposed rule.

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SUMMARY: This document proposes to amend the Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP) Regulations by adding the San Antonio International 
Airport (SAT), located in San Antonio, Texas, to the list of designated 
airports at which

[[Page 51731]]

certain aircraft arriving in the continental United States from certain 
areas south of the United States must land for CBP processing. This 
proposed amendment is made to improve the effectiveness of CBP 
enforcement efforts to combat the smuggling of contraband by air into 
the United States from the south.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before November 13, 2007.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by docket number, by one 
of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. 
Follow the instructions for submitting comments via docket number 
USCBP-2007-0017.
     Mail: Border Security Regulations Branch, Office of 
Regulations and Rulings, Customs and Border Protection, 1300 
Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., (Mint Annex), Washington, DC 20229.
    Instructions: All submissions received must include the agency name 
and docket number for this rulemaking. All comments received will be 
posted without change to http://www.regulations.gov, including any 
personal information provided. For detailed instructions on submitting 
comments and additional information on the rulemaking process, see the 
``Public Participation'' heading of the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION 
section of this document.
    Docket: For access to the docket to read background documents or 
comments received, go to http://www.regulations.gov. Submitted comments 
may also be inspected during regular business days between the hours of 
9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. at the Office of Regulations and Rulings, Customs 
and Border Protection, 799 9th Street, NW., 5th Floor, Washington, DC. 
Arrangements to inspect submitted comments should be made in advance by 
calling Mr. Joseph Clark at (202) 572-8768.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Fred Ramos, Program Manager, Traveler 
Security and Facilitation, Office of Field Operations, Customs and 
Border Protection at (202) 344-3726.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Public Participation

    Interested persons are invited to participate in this rulemaking by 
submitting written data, views, or arguments on all aspects of the 
proposed rule. CBP also invites comments that relate to the economic, 
environmental, or federalism affects that might result from this 
proposed rule. Comments that will provide the most assistance to CBP 
will reference a specific portion of the proposed rule, explain the 
reason for any recommended change, and include data, information, or 
authority that support such recommended change.

Background

    As part of CBP's efforts to combat drug-smuggling activities, CBP 
air commerce regulations were amended in 1975 by Treasury Decision 
(T.D.) 75-201, to impose special reporting requirements and control 
procedures on certain aircraft arriving in the continental United 
States via the U.S./Mexican border, the Pacific Coast, the Gulf of 
Mexico, or the Atlantic Coast from certain locations in the southern 
portion of the Western Hemisphere. These special reporting requirements 
apply to all aircraft except the following: Public aircraft; those 
aircraft operated on a regularly published schedule, pursuant to a 
certificate of public convenience and necessity or foreign aircraft 
permit issued by the Department of Transportation authorizing 
interstate, overseas air transportation; and those aircraft with a 
seating capacity of more than 30 passengers or a maximum payload 
capacity of more than 7,500 pounds which are engaged in air 
transportation for compensation or hire on demand (see 19 CFR 
122.23(a)). Thus, since 1975, commanders of such aircraft have been 
required to furnish CBP with timely notice of their intended arrival, 
and required to land at the nearest airport to the point of crossing 
designated by CBP for processing.
    Specifically, the regulations (19 CFR 122.23) provide that subject 
aircraft arriving in the continental United States from certain areas 
south of the United States must furnish a notice of intended arrival to 
the designated airport located nearest the point of crossing. Section 
122.24(b) (19 CFR 122.24(b)) provides that, unless exempt, such 
aircraft must land at designated airports for CBP processing and 
delineates the airports designated for reporting and processing 
purposes for these aircraft.
    During the previous six years, aircraft subject to the special 
reporting requirements entering the United States from the specified 
foreign areas at a point of crossing near San Antonio, were required to 
land at San Antonio International Airport (SAT) for processing by CBP. 
These international flights have been arriving at SAT since November 
2000, when SAT was temporarily designated as an airport where aircraft 
arriving from certain southern areas could land pursuant to section 
1453 of the Tariff Suspension and Trade Act of 2000 (Pub. L. 106-476, 
Nov. 9, 2000). The Miscellaneous Trade and Technical Corrections Act of 
2004 (Pub. L. 108-429, Dec. 3, 2004) effectively extended the airport's 
designation through November 9, 2006.
    This statutory designation has now expired. Community officials 
from San Antonio, Texas and the surrounding region have written CBP 
requesting that SAT be designated by regulation as an airport where 
aircraft arriving from certain southern areas must land.
    During the six years that SAT has been statutorily designated as an 
airport at which these aircraft arriving from the south may land for 
customs processing, CBP has reported no incidents or problems arising 
from this designation. Such a designation will impose no additional 
burdens on CBP as CBP already has a significant presence at SAT, 
processing international passengers arriving on scheduled commercial 
airliners as a landing rights airport. These same CBP personnel have 
been processing passengers arriving from the south since SAT was 
temporarily designated as an airport where aircraft arriving from the 
south could land pursuant to the Tariff Suspension and Trade Act of 
2000. SAT provides facilities and security and law enforcement support 
services, at no charge to CBP, to assist in the processing of aircraft. 
Consequently, by this document CBP is proposing to permanently 
designate SAT as an airport where certain aircraft, arriving in the 
United States from south of the United States, are authorized to land 
for CBP processing.

Proposed Amendment to Regulations

    If the proposed airport designation is adopted, the list of 
designated airports, at which certain aircraft arriving in the 
continental United States from certain areas south of the United States 
must land for CBP processing, at 19 CFR 122.24(b), will be amended to 
include San Antonio International Airport, located in San Antonio, 
Texas.

Authority

    This change is proposed under the authority of 5 U.S.C. 301, 19 
U.S.C. 1433(d), 1644a, and 1624, and the Homeland Security Act of 2002, 
Public Law 107-296 (November 25, 2002).

Signing Authority

    This amendment to the regulations is being issued in accordance 
with 19 CFR 0.2(a) pertaining to the authority of the Secretary of 
Homeland Security (or his or her delegate) to prescribe regulations not 
related to customs revenue functions.

[[Page 51732]]

The Regulatory Flexibility Act and Executive Order 12866

    This proposed amendment seeks to expand the list of designated 
airports at which certain aircraft may land for customs processing. As 
described in this document, certain international flights have been 
arriving at SAT, pursuant to statute, from November 2000, through 
November 9, 2006. The expansion of the list of designated airports to 
include SAT will not result in any new impact on affected parties but 
will result in a continuation of the previous situation. Therefore, CBP 
certifies that the proposed rule will not have significant economic 
impact on a substantial number of small entities. Accordingly, the 
document is not subject to the regulatory analysis or other 
requirements of 5 U.S.C. 603 and 604 of the Regulatory Flexibility Act 
(5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.). The Office of Management and Budget has 
determined that this regulatory proposal is not a significant 
regulatory action as defined under Executive Order 12866.

    Dated: September 4, 2007.
Michael Chertoff,
Secretary.
 [FR Doc. E7-17802 Filed 9-10-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 9111-14-P