30-Day Notice of Submission to the Office of Management and Budget; Opportunity for Public Comment, 49303-49305 [07-4204]

Download as PDF pwalker on PROD1PC71 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 166 / Tuesday, August 28, 2007 / Notices successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of December 5, 1924 (43 Stat. 0672). N–77816: 1. Valid and existing rights; 2. Right-of-way N–73694 for water facility purposes granted to Clark County Water Reclamation District, its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1761); 3. Right-of-way N–74485 for water facility purposes granted to Las Vegas Valley Water Distict, its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1761); 4. Right-of-way N–75392 for oil and gas pipeline purposes granted to Southwest Gas Corp., its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of February 25, 1920 (30 U.S.C. 185 sec. 28); 5. Right-of-way N–76755 for water facility purposes granted to Clark County, its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1761); and 6. Right-of-way N–81384 for water facility purposes granted to Clark County Water Reclamation District, its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1761). N–77818: 1. Valid and existing rights; 2. Right-of-way N–75246 for road purposes granted to Clark County, its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1761); 3. Right-of-way N–77199 for water facility purposes granted to Clark County Water Reclamation District, its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1761); 4. Right-of-way N–77507 for water facility purposes granted to Las Vegas Valley Water District, its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1761); 5. Right-of-way N–77554 for telephone line purposes granted to Central Telephone Co., its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1761); 6. Right-of-way N–77845 for transmission line purposes granted to Nevada Power Co., its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1761); 7. Right-of-way N–77953 for oil and gas pipeline purposes granted to Southwest Gas Corp., its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of February 25, 1920 (30 U.S.C. 185 sec. 28); and 8. Right-of-way N–78923 for drainage facility purposes granted to Clark County, its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1761). VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:52 Aug 27, 2007 Jkt 211001 N–77819: 1. Valid and existing rights; 2. Right-of-way N–61873 for road purposes granted to Clark County, its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1761); 3. Right-of-way N–74322 for road purposes granted to Clark County, its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1761); and 4. Right-of-way N–77199 for water facility purposes granted to Clark County Water Reclamation District, its successors or assigns, pursuant to the Act of October 21, 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1761). Additional detailed information concerning this action is available for review at the Bureau of Land Management, Las Vegas Field Office, at the above address. On August 28, 2007, the above described land will be segregated from all other forms of appropriation under the public land laws, including the general mining laws, except for lease/ conveyance under the R&PP Act, leasing under the mineral leasing laws, and disposal under the mineral material disposal laws. Classification Comments: Interested parties may submit comments involving the suitability of the land for postal facility sites. Comments on the classification are restricted to whether the land is physically suited for the proposal, whether the use will maximize the future use or uses of the land, whether the use is consistent with local planning and zoning, or if the use is consistent with State and Federal programs. Application Comments: Interested parties may submit comments regarding the specific use proposed in the application and plan of development, whether the BLM followed proper administrative procedures in reaching the decision to lease/convey under the R&PP Act, or any other factor not directly related to the suitability of the land for post offices. Comments, including names and addresses of respondents, will be available for public review. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comments, be advised that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. The BLM will make available for PO 00000 Frm 00057 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 49303 public review, in their entirety, all comments submitted by businesses or organizations, including comments by individuals in their capacity as an official or representative of a business or organization. Any adverse comments will be reviewed by the BLM Nevada State Director, who may sustain, vacate, or modify this realty action. In the absence of any adverse comments, the classification will become effective on October 29, 2007. The lands will not be available for lease/conveyance until after the classification becomes effective. (Authority: 43 CFR part 2741) Dated: August 17, 2007. Kimber Liebhauser, Acting Assistant Field Manager, Lands. [FR Doc. E7–17007 Filed 8–27–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–HC–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service 30-Day Notice of Submission to the Office of Management and Budget; Opportunity for Public Comment Department of the Interior, National Park Service. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. AGENCY: SUMMARY: Under provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 and 5 CFR Part 1320, Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements, the National Park Service (NPS) invites public comments on a proposed new collection of information (OMB #1024– XXXX). DATES: Public comments on this Information Collection Request (ICR) will be accepted on or before September 27, 2007. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments directly to the Desk Officer for the Department of the Interior (OMB #1024– XXXX), Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB, by fax at 202/ 395–6566, or by electronic mail at oira_docket@omb.eop.gov. Please also send a copy of your comments to Patricia A. Taylor, University of Wyoming, Department of Sociology/ Dept. 3293, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, Wyoming 82071; or via phone at 307/766–6870; or via e-mail at gaia@uwvo.edu. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. James Gramann, NPS Social Science Program, 1201 I. St., NW., Washington, DC 20005; or via phone at 202/513– 7189; or via e-mail at James_Gramann@partner.nps.gov., or by E:\FR\FM\28AUN1.SGM 28AUN1 pwalker on PROD1PC71 with NOTICES 49304 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 166 / Tuesday, August 28, 2007 / Notices fax at 979/845–4792. You are entitled to a copy of the entire ICR package free-ofcharge. Comments Received on the 60-Day Federal Register Notice: The NPS published a 60-Day Notice to solicit public comments on this ICR in the Federal Register on December 6, 206 (Vol. 71, 234, Page 70786–70787). The comment period closed on February 5, 2007. After multiple notifications to stakeholders requesting comments, the NPS received five comments as a result of the publication of this 60-Day Federal Register Notice. One respondent was concerned over the number of surveys the NPS conducts and the potential for bias in all surveys. However, there is no duplication of information with this study, as the Comprehensive Survey of the American Public is the one national survey that focuses on issues of importance to the NPS. Moreover, it is the only national survey that contacts non-visitors to National Park System units. In addition to visitors, non-visitors comprise a population of vital interest to the NPS. Two of the respondents wanted to be reassured that the results of the survey would be communicated to them directly (American Recreation Coalition and National Parks Conservation Association). One respondent suggest a number of questions, which were, or are now, part of the survey, with one exception. America Outdoors suggested a question on attitudes toward fees to enter the park. This question is quite ‘‘layered’’ in that there are several different kinds of fees (the annual parks pass, the specific fee for one park, additional access fees for special areas, and passes for the disabled). Moreover, the recent national survey for the Departments of the Interior and Agriculture for the Interagency America the Beautiful Pass addressed these issues only one year earlier. Therefore, this question is not included in the 2007 NPS Comprehensive Survey. Finally, the National Park Hospitality Association was fundamentally concerned with the ‘‘creation’’ of resources such as soundscape, and suggested that such questions be removed from the survey. The General Authorities Act of 1970 and the 1978 amendment to the Act known as the Redwood amendment, as well as the National Parks Omnibus Management Act of 1998, contain the basis of the NPS management policies on natural resources, including soundscapes. The soundscape management policy of the NPS is detailed in section 4.9 of ‘‘Management Policies 2006’’ of the NPS, which states (NPS 206:56) that ‘‘Using appropriate management VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:52 Aug 27, 2007 Jkt 211001 planning, superintendents will identify what levels and types of unnatural sound constitute acceptable impacts on park natural soundscapes.’’ This survey will assist in that planning process. SUPPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: 2007 National Park Service Comprehensive Survey of the American Public. Bureau Form Number(s): None. OMB Number: To be requested. Expiration Date: To be requested. Type of Request: New Collection. Description of Need: The NPS conducted its last comprehensive survey of the American public in 2000. That survey provided valuable information on patterns of use and nonuse of parks and on the demographic characteristics of visitors and nonvisitors that have been used to inform NPS decision-making. However, since 2000 many events and actions have occurred with the potential to affect the public’s knowledge, behavior, and opinions regarding the NPS and the National Park System. Examples include the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, higher fuel prices, and several catastrophic hurricanes and wildfires. In addition, the U.S. population has aged and become more racially and ethnically diverse since the last comprehensive survey. Although the NPS and its research partners regularly survey visitors to selected National Park System Units, these separate surveys cannot be rolled up into a description of visitors at the national and regional levels, nor do they describe the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of non-visitors and former visitors. Furthermore, individual park visitor surveys are not able to show trends in the knowledge, opinions, and behavior of the U.S. population over time. This information is essential to informing many important planning and management decisions of the NPS, ranging from visitor services, fee policy, and resource management actions to civic engagement and visitors and nonvisitors over time can also provide a perspective on how national and regional populations are changing in their knowledge of the National Park System and in their use of parks, including leisure travel patterns, perceived service quality, and constraints to park visitation. The method of information collection for the 2007 survey will be a nationwide telephone survey of households conducted using a random-digit-dial (RDD) telephone sample, disproportionately stratified by the seven NPS administrative regions (including the states of Alaska and PO 00000 Frm 00058 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Hawaii). In each of the seven regions, 500 completed interviews of about 15 minutes length will be obtained, for a total of 3,500 completions. The data collected from the comprehensive survey will profile patterns in visitation and non-visitation to the National Park System. These findings will be described in a national technical report and in reports for each of the seven NPS regions. Thematic reports on specific policy and management issues included in the survey will be produced, and a summary report tracking changes in key variables between 2000 and 2007 will be written. In order to produce the best survey possible, the NPS has been and will continue to conduct development work in the form of pre-testing, cognitive interviews, and focus groups to inform survey design. The increase in the popularity of cell phone calls into question the adequacy of conventional land-line sampling frames from which households are selected through random digit dialing (RDD). Looking to the future, survey methodology will need a mechanism to sample additional cell users. In this survey, an add-on of a cell phone user sample will form a benchmark to compare sampling differences with the RDD results. The cell suer sample will be compared to the land-line sample, looking at demographic characteristics of respondents, park visitation rates, and attitudinal variables. This information is needed by NPS to determine whether changes in measures racked over time represent actual shifts in knowledge, attitudes, or behavior or are instead artifacts of differences in responses between cell-only households and households with land-lines. Comments are invited on: (1) The practical utility of the information being gathered; (2) the accuracy of the burden hour estimate; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) ways to minimize the burden to respondents, including sue of automated information collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your foment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Frequency of collection: Once. Description of Respondent: United States residents. E:\FR\FM\28AUN1.SGM 28AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 166 / Tuesday, August 28, 2007 / Notices Estimated average number of respondents: 4042 per year (Final Survey: 4,000; Developmental work: focus = 12, cognitive interview = 12, pre-test calling = 20). Estimated average number of responses: 4042 per year. Estimated average time burden per respondent: 4 hours per respondent (Final Survey: 15 minutes/respondent; Developmental work: focus group = 90 minutes/respondent, cognitive interview = 120 minutes/respondent, pre-test calling = 15 minutes/ respondent). Frequency of response: 1 time per respondent. Estimated total annual reporting burden: 1047 hours per year. Dated: July 25, 2007. Leonard E. Stowe, NPS, Information Collection Clearance Officer. [FR Doc. 07–4204 Filed 8–27–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–M DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service 30-Day Notice of Submission to the Office of Management and Budget; Opportunity for Public Comment Department of the Interior, National Park Service. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. pwalker on PROD1PC71 with NOTICES AGENCY: SUMMARY: Under provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 and 5 CFR Part 1320, Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements, the National Park Service (NPS) invites public comments on a proposed new collection of information (OMB #1024– XXXX). DATES: Public comments on this Information Collection Request (ICR) will be accepted on or before September 27, 2007. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments directly to the Desk Officer for the Department of the Interior (OMB #1024– XXXX), Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB, by fax at 202/ 395–6566, or by electronic mail at oira_docket@omb.eop.gov. Please also send a copy of your comments to Patricia A. Taylor, University of Wyoming, Department of Sociology/ Dept. 3293; 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY 82071; or via phone 307/ 766–6870; or via e-mail at gaia@uwvo.edu. Dr. James Gramann, NPS Social Science FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:52 Aug 27, 2007 Jkt 211001 Program, 1201 ‘‘Eye’’ St., NW., Washington, DC 20005; or via phone 202/513–7189; or via e-mail at James_Gramann@partner.nps.gov. You are entitled to a copy of the entire ICR package free-of-charge. Comments Received on the 60-Day FEDERAL REGISTER Notice: The NPS published a 60-Day Notice to solicit public comments on this ICR in the Federal Register on December 6, 2006 (Vol. 71, No. 234, Page 70786–70787). The comment period closed on February 5, 2007. After multiple notifications to stakeholders requesting comments, the NPS received five comments as a result of the publication of this 60-Day Federal Register Notice. One respondent was concerned over the number of surveys the NPS conducts and the potential for bias in all surveys. However, there is no duplication of information with this study, as the Comprehensive Survey of the American Public is the only national survey that focuses on issues of importance to the NPS. Moreover, it is the only national survey that contacts non-visitors to National Park System units. In addition to visitors, non-visitors comprise a population of vital interest to the NPS. Two of the respondents wanted to be reassured that the results of the survey would be communicated to them directly (American Recreation Coalition and National Parks Conservation Association). One respondent suggested a number of questions, which were, or are now, part of the survey, with one exception. America Outdoors suggested a question on attitudes toward fees to enter the park. This question is quite ‘‘layered’’ in that there are several different kinds of fees (the annual parks pass, the specific fee for one park, additional access fees for special areas, and passes for the disabled). Moreover, the recent national survey for the Departments of the Interior and Agriculture for the Interagency America the Beautiful Pass addressed these issues only one year earlier. Therefore, this question is not included in the 2007 NPS Comprehensive Survey. Finally, the National Park Hospitality Association was fundamentally concerned with the ‘‘creation’’ of resources such as soundscape, and suggested that such questions be removed from the survey. The General Authorities Act of 1970 and the 1978 amendment to the Act known as the Redwood amendment, as well as the National Parks Omnibus Management Act of 1998, contain the basis of the NPS management policies on natural resources, including soundscapes. The soundscape management policy of the NPS is detailed in section 4.9 of PO 00000 Frm 00059 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 49305 ‘‘Management Policies 2006’’ of the NPS, which states (NPS 2006:56) that ‘‘Using appropriate management planning, superintendents will identify what levels and types of unnatural sound constitute acceptable impacts on park natural soundscapes.’’ This survey will assist in that planning process. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: 2007 National Park Service Comprehensive Survey of the American Public. Bureau Form Number(s): None. OMB Number: To be requested. Expiration Date: To be requested. Type of request: New Collection. Description of Need: The NPS conducted its last comprehensive survey of the American public in 2000. That survey provided valuable information on patterns of use and nonuse of parks and on the demographic characteristics of visitors and non-visitors that have been used to inform NPS decision-making. However, since 2000 many events and actions have occurred with the potential to affect the public’s knowledge, behavior, and opinions regarding the NPS and the National Park System. Examples include the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, higher fuel prices, and several catastrophic hurricanes and wildfires. In addition, the U.S. population has aged and become more racially and ethnically diverse since the last comprehensive survey. Although the NPS and its research partners regularly survey visitors to selected National Park System units, these separate surveys cannot be rolled up into a description of visitors at the national and regional levels, nor do they describe the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of non-visitors and former visitors. Furthermore, individual park visitor surveys are not able to show trends in the knowledge, opinions, and behavior of the U.S. population over time. This information is essential to informing many important planning and management decisions of the NPS, ranging from visitor services, fee policy, and resource management actions to civic engagement and visitors and nonvisitors over time can also provide a perspective on how national and regional populations are changing in their knowledge of the National Park System and in their use of parks, including leisure travel patterns, perceived service quality, and constraints to park visitation. The method of information collection for the 2007 survey will be a nationwide telephone survey of households conducted using a random-digit-dial (RDD) telephone sample, E:\FR\FM\28AUN1.SGM 28AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 166 (Tuesday, August 28, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 49303-49305]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 07-4204]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


30-Day Notice of Submission to the Office of Management and 
Budget; Opportunity for Public Comment

AGENCY: Department of the Interior, National Park Service.

ACTION:  Notice and request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Under provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 and 5 
CFR Part 1320, Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements, the National 
Park Service (NPS) invites public comments on a proposed new collection 
of information (OMB 1024-XXXX).

DATES: Public comments on this Information Collection Request (ICR) 
will be accepted on or before September 27, 2007.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments directly to the Desk Officer for the 
Department of the Interior (OMB 1024-XXXX), Office of 
Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB, by fax at 202/395-6566, or by 
electronic mail at oira_docket@omb.eop.gov. Please also send a copy of 
your comments to Patricia A. Taylor, University of Wyoming, Department 
of Sociology/Dept. 3293, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, Wyoming 
82071; or via phone at 307/766-6870; or via e-mail at gaia@uwvo.edu.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. James Gramann, NPS Social Science 
Program, 1201 I. St., NW., Washington, DC 20005; or via phone at 202/
513-7189; or via e-mail at James--Gramann@partner.nps.gov., or by

[[Page 49304]]

fax at 979/845-4792. You are entitled to a copy of the entire ICR 
package free-of-charge.
    Comments Received on the 60-Day Federal Register Notice: The NPS 
published a 60-Day Notice to solicit public comments on this ICR in the 
Federal Register on December 6, 206 (Vol. 71, 234, Page 70786-70787). 
The comment period closed on February 5, 2007. After multiple 
notifications to stakeholders requesting comments, the NPS received 
five comments as a result of the publication of this 60-Day Federal 
Register Notice.
    One respondent was concerned over the number of surveys the NPS 
conducts and the potential for bias in all surveys. However, there is 
no duplication of information with this study, as the Comprehensive 
Survey of the American Public is the one national survey that focuses 
on issues of importance to the NPS. Moreover, it is the only national 
survey that contacts non-visitors to National Park System units. In 
addition to visitors, non-visitors comprise a population of vital 
interest to the NPS. Two of the respondents wanted to be reassured that 
the results of the survey would be communicated to them directly 
(American Recreation Coalition and National Parks Conservation 
Association). One respondent suggest a number of questions, which were, 
or are now, part of the survey, with one exception. America Outdoors 
suggested a question on attitudes toward fees to enter the park. This 
question is quite ``layered'' in that there are several different kinds 
of fees (the annual parks pass, the specific fee for one park, 
additional access fees for special areas, and passes for the disabled). 
Moreover, the recent national survey for the Departments of the 
Interior and Agriculture for the Interagency America the Beautiful Pass 
addressed these issues only one year earlier. Therefore, this question 
is not included in the 2007 NPS Comprehensive Survey. Finally, the 
National Park Hospitality Association was fundamentally concerned with 
the ``creation'' of resources such as soundscape, and suggested that 
such questions be removed from the survey. The General Authorities Act 
of 1970 and the 1978 amendment to the Act known as the Redwood 
amendment, as well as the National Parks Omnibus Management Act of 
1998, contain the basis of the NPS management policies on natural 
resources, including soundscapes. The soundscape management policy of 
the NPS is detailed in section 4.9 of ``Management Policies 2006'' of 
the NPS, which states (NPS 206:56) that ``Using appropriate management 
planning, superintendents will identify what levels and types of 
unnatural sound constitute acceptable impacts on park natural 
soundscapes.'' This survey will assist in that planning process.

SUPPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
    Title: 2007 National Park Service Comprehensive Survey of the 
American Public.
    Bureau Form Number(s): None.
    OMB Number: To be requested.
    Expiration Date: To be requested.
    Type of Request: New Collection.
    Description of Need: The NPS conducted its last comprehensive 
survey of the American public in 2000. That survey provided valuable 
information on patterns of use and non-use of parks and on the 
demographic characteristics of visitors and non-visitors that have been 
used to inform NPS decision-making. However, since 2000 many events and 
actions have occurred with the potential to affect the public's 
knowledge, behavior, and opinions regarding the NPS and the National 
Park System. Examples include the terrorist attacks of September 11, 
2001, higher fuel prices, and several catastrophic hurricanes and 
wildfires. In addition, the U.S. population has aged and become more 
racially and ethnically diverse since the last comprehensive survey.
    Although the NPS and its research partners regularly survey 
visitors to selected National Park System Units, these separate surveys 
cannot be rolled up into a description of visitors at the national and 
regional levels, nor do they describe the knowledge, attitudes, and 
behaviors of non-visitors and former visitors. Furthermore, individual 
park visitor surveys are not able to show trends in the knowledge, 
opinions, and behavior of the U.S. population over time. This 
information is essential to informing many important planning and 
management decisions of the NPS, ranging from visitor services, fee 
policy, and resource management actions to civic engagement and 
visitors and non-visitors over time can also provide a perspective on 
how national and regional populations are changing in their knowledge 
of the National Park System and in their use of parks, including 
leisure travel patterns, perceived service quality, and constraints to 
park visitation.
    The method of information collection for the 2007 survey will be a 
nationwide telephone survey of households conducted using a random-
digit-dial (RDD) telephone sample, disproportionately stratified by the 
seven NPS administrative regions (including the states of Alaska and 
Hawaii). In each of the seven regions, 500 completed interviews of 
about 15 minutes length will be obtained, for a total of 3,500 
completions. The data collected from the comprehensive survey will 
profile patterns in visitation and non-visitation to the National Park 
System. These findings will be described in a national technical report 
and in reports for each of the seven NPS regions. Thematic reports on 
specific policy and management issues included in the survey will be 
produced, and a summary report tracking changes in key variables 
between 2000 and 2007 will be written. In order to produce the best 
survey possible, the NPS has been and will continue to conduct 
development work in the form of pre-testing, cognitive interviews, and 
focus groups to inform survey design.
    The increase in the popularity of cell phone calls into question 
the adequacy of conventional land-line sampling frames from which 
households are selected through random digit dialing (RDD). Looking to 
the future, survey methodology will need a mechanism to sample 
additional cell users. In this survey, an add-on of a cell phone user 
sample will form a benchmark to compare sampling differences with the 
RDD results. The cell suer sample will be compared to the land-line 
sample, looking at demographic characteristics of respondents, park 
visitation rates, and attitudinal variables. This information is needed 
by NPS to determine whether changes in measures racked over time 
represent actual shifts in knowledge, attitudes, or behavior or are 
instead artifacts of differences in responses between cell-only 
households and households with land-lines.
    Comments are invited on: (1) The practical utility of the 
information being gathered; (2) the accuracy of the burden hour 
estimate; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the 
information to be collected; and (4) ways to minimize the burden to 
respondents, including sue of automated information collection 
techniques or other forms of information technology. Before including 
your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal 
identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your 
entire comment--may be made publicly available at any time. While you 
can ask us in your foment to withhold your personal identifying 
information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be 
able to do so.
    Frequency of collection: Once.
    Description of Respondent: United States residents.

[[Page 49305]]

    Estimated average number of respondents: 4042 per year (Final 
Survey: 4,000; Developmental work: focus = 12, cognitive interview = 
12, pre-test calling = 20).
    Estimated average number of responses: 4042 per year.
    Estimated average time burden per respondent: 4 hours per 
respondent (Final Survey: 15 minutes/respondent; Developmental work: 
focus group = 90 minutes/respondent, cognitive interview = 120 minutes/
respondent, pre-test calling = 15 minutes/respondent).
    Frequency of response: 1 time per respondent.
    Estimated total annual reporting burden: 1047 hours per year.

    Dated: July 25, 2007.
Leonard E. Stowe,
NPS, Information Collection Clearance Officer.
[FR Doc. 07-4204 Filed 8-27-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-M