Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Intermountain Region, Denver, CO, 48676-48677 [E7-16801]

Download as PDF 48676 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 164 / Friday, August 24, 2007 / Notices Rancheria, California (Tachi Yokut Tribe) have requested the unassociated funerary objects described above for repatriation. Officials of the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the 16 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. Officials of the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Renee Tucker, Assistant Curator of History, Fort Worth Museum of Science and History, 1501 Montgomery Street, Fort Worth, TX 76107, telephone (817) 255–9325, before September 24, 2007. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Fort Worth Museum of Science and History is responsible for notifying the Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California that this notice has been published. Dated: August 3, 2007. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–16798 Filed 8–23–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Intermountain Region, Denver, CO National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: yshivers on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession and control of the U.S. VerDate Aug<31>2005 14:35 Aug 23, 2007 Jkt 211001 Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Intermountain Region, Denver, CO. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from El Morro National Monument, NM and unknown areas of the Southwestern United States. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the joint responsibility of the NAGPRA coordinator, Intermountain Region and the superintendent, El Morro National Monument. A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by Intermountain Region and El Morro National Monument professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Colorado River Indian Tribes of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, Arizona and California; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Prior to 1935, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were removed from El Morro National Monument in McKinley County, NM. The human remains were donated to Western State College of Colorado, which returned them to the National Park Service in 1994. Osteological analysis in 1994 determined that the human remains are Native American. No other information is known about the human remains. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1985, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were found in the curation facility at the former Southwest Regional Office in Santa Fe, NM. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1994, the human remains underwent osteological analysis and were found to be Native American. The curation facility houses collections from multiple parks across the Southwestern United States, but due to the lack of contextual information it is impossible PO 00000 Frm 00068 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 to determine from which park they were originally recovered. In 2000, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were confiscated in Virginia as the result of a NAGPRA trafficking investigation. At the conclusion of the case, the human remains and cultural items were turned over to the National Park Service’s Northeast Region, which transferred them to the Intermountain Region in 2006. No known individuals were identified. The 17 associated funerary objects are 1 bag containing leather fragments, 1 bag containing hide fragments, 1 bird bone fragment, and 14 bags containing textile fragments. Osteological examination, radiocarbon dating, and analysis of the associated funerary objects conducted by professionals at the Smithsonian Institution indicate that the human remains and cultural items were likely removed from prehistoric and historic Native American gravesites in the Southwestern United States. However, the available information is insufficient to determine cultural affiliation. Officials of the Intermountain Region and El Morro National Monument have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of nine individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Intermountain Region and El Morro National Monument also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 17 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Intermountain Region and El Morro National Monument have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot reasonably be traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present–day Indian tribe. The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee (Review Committee) is responsible for recommending specific actions for disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains. In March 2007, the Intermountain Region requested that the Review Committee recommend repatriation of the nine culturally unidentifiable human remains and 17 associated funerary objects to the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico as coclaimants. The human remains and cultural items were likely recovered from the geographic proximity of the E:\FR\FM\24AUN1.SGM 24AUN1 yshivers on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 164 / Friday, August 24, 2007 / Notices Indian tribes consulted, all of whom support the co–claim. The Review Committee considered the proposal at its April 19–20, 2007 meeting and recommended disposition of the human remains to the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. The National Park Service intends to convey the 17 associated funerary objects to the tribes pursuant to 16 U.S.C. 18f–2. A May 31, 2007 letter from the Designated Federal Official on behalf of the chair of the Review Committee to the NAGPRA coordinator, Intermountain Region transmitted the Review Committee’s recommendation that the Intermountain Region effect disposition of the physical remains of nine culturally unidentifiable individuals to the two Indian tribes listed above contingent on the publication of a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register. This notice fulfills that requirement. The letter mistakenly noted that there were ten associated funerary objects rather than the seventeen described above. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Dave Ruppert, NAGPRA coordinator, NPS Intermountain Region, 12795 W. Alameda Parkway, Denver, CO 80228, telephone (303) 969–2879, before September 24, 2007. Disposition of the human remains to the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Intermountain Region is responsible for notifying the Colorado River Indian Tribes of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, Arizona and California; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published. VerDate Aug<31>2005 14:35 Aug 23, 2007 Jkt 211001 Dated: August 7, 2007. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–16801 Filed 8–23–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA that meets the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary objects’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. The four cultural items are three brass sheet fragments and one vial of shell and glass bead fragments. In 1903, three cultural items were recovered from the Silverheels site in Brant, Erie County, NY, during a Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology expedition led by M.R. Harrington and A.C. Parker. Museum documentation indicates that the cultural items were interred with human remains. The human remains that were originally associated with these items were published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register on October 5, 2001 (FR Doc 01– 24963; pages 51060–51062), and have since been transferred to the culturally affiliated groups. Therefore, the cultural items are now unassociated funerary objects. The three unassociated funerary objects are brass sheet fragments. This interment most likely dates to the early Contact period (A.D. 1500– 1700). Sheet brass was a European import item, and therefore indicates a post-contact date. In the Haudenosaunee region, objects of European brass are usually found on Native sites, which date to the second quarter of the 16th PO 00000 Frm 00069 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 48677 century and later. Other artifacts from this site which support an early Contact date include Levanna and Madison style projectile points; ceramic vessels with globular bodies, constricted zoned– incised necks, and castellated rims; and a variety of terra cotta pipes. Multivariate attributes and statistical analysis of ceramic artifacts from the Silverheels site indicates the site represents a single occupation during the early 17th century. In 1904, one cultural item was recovered from the Ripley Site in Ripley, Chautauqua County, NY, during a Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology expedition led by M.R. Harrington. Museum documentation indicates that this item was interred with human remains. The human remains that were originally associated with this item were published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register on October 5, 2001 (FR Doc 01–24963, pages 51060–51062), and have since been transferred to the culturally affiliated groups. Therefore, this cultural item is now an unassociated funerary object. The one unassociated funerary object is a vial of shell and glass bead fragments. This interment most likely dates to the Late Woodland period (A.D. 1300– 1450) or early Contact period (A.D. 1550–1650). Glass beads were introduced by Europeans as trade items in the late 16th/early 17th century. Artifacts from this site which support a Late Woodland period or later date include Levanna and Madison style projectile points; ceramic vessels with globular bodies, constricted zonedincised necks, and castellated rims; and a variety of terra cotta pipes including trumpet shaped bowls and bowls with representations of human faces and animals. Radiocarbon dating indicates that the site is multi–component with occupations between A.D. 1300–1450 and A.D. 1550–1650. Museum records and consultation evidence indicate that the cultural items were removed from specific burials of Native Americans. Consultation with representatives from the Iroquois suggests that Erie County and Chautauqua County, NY, were within the traditional territory of the Seneca Nation during the periods from which these interments date. Furthermore, due to a shared cultural identity among the member Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, the Nations have requested that cultural affiliation be to all of the present-day Iroquois groups. Descendants of the Iroquois are members of the Cayuga Nation of New York; Oneida Nation of New York; Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin; E:\FR\FM\24AUN1.SGM 24AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 164 (Friday, August 24, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 48676-48677]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-16801]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, 
National Park Service, Intermountain Region, Denver, CO

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession and control of the U.S. Department of the 
Interior, National Park Service, Intermountain Region, Denver, CO. The 
human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from El 
Morro National Monument, NM and unknown areas of the Southwestern 
United States.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the joint responsibility of the 
NAGPRA coordinator, Intermountain Region and the superintendent, El 
Morro National Monument.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by Intermountain Region and El Morro National Monument 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Colorado 
River Indian Tribes of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, Arizona 
and California; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New 
Mexico; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Pueblo of Acoma, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Tesuque, New Mexico; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute 
Reservation, Colorado; Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain 
Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni 
Reservation, New Mexico.
    Prior to 1935, human remains representing a minimum of three 
individuals were removed from El Morro National Monument in McKinley 
County, NM. The human remains were donated to Western State College of 
Colorado, which returned them to the National Park Service in 1994. 
Osteological analysis in 1994 determined that the human remains are 
Native American. No other information is known about the human remains. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
are present.
    In 1985, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
were found in the curation facility at the former Southwest Regional 
Office in Santa Fe, NM. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1994, the human remains underwent osteological analysis and were 
found to be Native American. The curation facility houses collections 
from multiple parks across the Southwestern United States, but due to 
the lack of contextual information it is impossible to determine from 
which park they were originally recovered.
    In 2000, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
were confiscated in Virginia as the result of a NAGPRA trafficking 
investigation. At the conclusion of the case, the human remains and 
cultural items were turned over to the National Park Service's 
Northeast Region, which transferred them to the Intermountain Region in 
2006. No known individuals were identified. The 17 associated funerary 
objects are 1 bag containing leather fragments, 1 bag containing hide 
fragments, 1 bird bone fragment, and 14 bags containing textile 
fragments.
    Osteological examination, radiocarbon dating, and analysis of the 
associated funerary objects conducted by professionals at the 
Smithsonian Institution indicate that the human remains and cultural 
items were likely removed from prehistoric and historic Native American 
gravesites in the Southwestern United States. However, the available 
information is insufficient to determine cultural affiliation.
    Officials of the Intermountain Region and El Morro National 
Monument have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the 
human remains described above represent the physical remains of nine 
individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Intermountain 
Region and El Morro National Monument also have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 17 objects described above are 
reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human 
remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or 
ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Intermountain Region and El Morro 
National Monument have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), 
a relationship of shared group identity cannot reasonably be traced 
between the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects and any present-day Indian tribe.
    The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review 
Committee (Review Committee) is responsible for recommending specific 
actions for disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains. In 
March 2007, the Intermountain Region requested that the Review 
Committee recommend repatriation of the nine culturally unidentifiable 
human remains and 17 associated funerary objects to the Pueblo of 
Acoma, New Mexico and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico as 
co-claimants. The human remains and cultural items were likely 
recovered from the geographic proximity of the

[[Page 48677]]

Indian tribes consulted, all of whom support the co-claim. The Review 
Committee considered the proposal at its April 19-20, 2007 meeting and 
recommended disposition of the human remains to the Pueblo of Acoma, 
New Mexico and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. The 
National Park Service intends to convey the 17 associated funerary 
objects to the tribes pursuant to 16 U.S.C. 18f-2.
    A May 31, 2007 letter from the Designated Federal Official on 
behalf of the chair of the Review Committee to the NAGPRA coordinator, 
Intermountain Region transmitted the Review Committee's recommendation 
that the Intermountain Region effect disposition of the physical 
remains of nine culturally unidentifiable individuals to the two Indian 
tribes listed above contingent on the publication of a Notice of 
Inventory Completion in the Federal Register. This notice fulfills that 
requirement. The letter mistakenly noted that there were ten associated 
funerary objects rather than the seventeen described above.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Dave Ruppert, NAGPRA coordinator, NPS 
Intermountain Region, 12795 W. Alameda Parkway, Denver, CO 80228, 
telephone (303) 969-2879, before September 24, 2007. Disposition of the 
human remains to the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico and Zuni Tribe of the 
Zuni Reservation, New Mexico may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    Intermountain Region is responsible for notifying the Colorado 
River Indian Tribes of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, Arizona 
and California; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New 
Mexico; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Pueblo of Acoma, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Tesuque, New Mexico; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute 
Reservation, Colorado; Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain 
Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni 
Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published.

    Dated: August 7, 2007.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E7-16801 Filed 8-23-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S