Special Conditions: Centex Aerospace Inc., Cirrus Design Corporation Model SR22; Installation of a Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) Engine and the Protection of the System From the Effects of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF), 43137-43139 [E7-14935]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 149 / Friday, August 3, 2007 / Rules and Regulations have occurred, or are anticipated, and which may affect the attainment of overall Project objectives, prevent the meeting of time schedules or objectives, or preclude the attainment of particular Project work elements during established time periods. This disclosure shall be accompanied by a statement of the action taken or planned to resolve the situation; and (3) Objectives and timetable established for the next reporting period. (b) A final project performance report must be provided by the recipient. It must provide an evaluation of the success of the Project in meeting the objectives of the program. The final report may serve as the last annual report. (c) The Agency will monitor recipients, as it determines necessary, to assure that Projects are completed in accordance with the approved scope of work and that the grant is expended for Eligible Grant Purposes. (d) Recipients shall diligently monitor performance to ensure that time schedules are being met, projected work within designated time periods is being accomplished, and other performance objectives are being achieved. § 1739.20 Audit requirements. A grant recipient shall provide the Agency with an audit for each year, beginning with the year in which a portion of the financial assistance is expended, in accordance with the following: (a) If the recipient is a for-profit entity, an existing Telecommunications or Electric Borrower with the Agency, or any other entity not covered by the following paragraph, the recipient shall provide an independent audit report in accordance with 7 CFR part 1773, ‘‘Policy on Audits of the Agency’s Borrowers.’’ (b) If the recipient is a State or local government, or non-profit organization, the recipient shall provide an audit in accordance with 7 CFR part 3052, ‘‘Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations.’’ rmajette on PROD1PC64 with RULES § 1739.21 OMB Control Number. The information collection requirements in this part are approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and assigned OMB control number 0572–0127. VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:45 Aug 02, 2007 Jkt 211001 Subpart B—[Reserved] Dated: July 19, 2007. James M. Andrew, Administrator, Rural Utilities Service. [FR Doc. E7–15106 Filed 8–2–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–15–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 23 [Docket No. CE272; Special Conditions No. 23–212–SC] Special Conditions: Centex Aerospace Inc., Cirrus Design Corporation Model SR22; Installation of a Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) Engine and the Protection of the System From the Effects of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final special conditions; request for comments. AGENCY: SUMMARY: These special conditions are issued for the Centex Aerospace Inc. modified Cirrus Design Corporation Model SR22. This airplane as modified by Centex Aerospace Inc. will have a novel or unusual design feature(s) associated with the installation of a full authority digital engine control (FADEC) engine. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for this design feature. These special conditions contain the additional safety standards that the Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards. DATES: The effective date of these special conditions is July 26, 2007. Comments must be received on or before September 4, 2007. ADDRESSES: Comments may be mailed in duplicate to: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Regional Counsel, ACE–7, Attention: Rules Docket, Docket No. CE272, 901 Locust, Room 506, Kansas City, Missouri 64106, or delivered in duplicate to the Regional Counsel at the above address. Comments must be marked: Docket No. CE272. Comments may be inspected in the Rules Docket weekdays, except Federal holidays, between 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Peter L. Rouse, Federal Aviation Administration, Aircraft Certification Service, Small Airplane Directorate, PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 43137 ACE–111, 901 Locust, Room 301, Kansas City, Missouri 64106; telephone: 816–329–4135, fax: 816–329–4090. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FAA has determined that notice and opportunity for prior public comment hereon are impracticable because these procedures would significantly delay issuance of the design approval and thus delivery of the affected aircraft. In addition, the substance of these special conditions has been subject to the public comment process in several prior instances with no substantive comments received. The FAA, therefore, finds that good cause exists for making these special conditions effective upon issuance. Comments Invited We invite interested people to take part in this rulemaking by sending written comments, data, or views. The most helpful comments reference a specific portion of the special conditions, explain the reason for any recommended change, and include supporting data. We ask that you send us two copies of written comments. We will file in the docket all comments we receive, as well as a report summarizing each substantive public contact with FAA personnel about these special conditions. You can inspect the docket before and after the comment closing date. If you wish to review the docket in person, go to the address in the ADDRESSES section of this preamble between 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. We will consider all comments we receive by the closing date for comments. We will consider comments filed late if it is possible to do so without incurring expense or delay. We may change these special conditions based on the comments we receive. If you want us to let you know we received your comments on these special conditions, send us a preaddressed, stamped postcard on which the docket number appears. We will stamp the date on the postcard and mail it back to you. Background On March 15, 2004, Centex Aerospace, Inc. applied for a supplemental type certificate for the Cirrus Model SR22 to install a full authority digital engine control in the Cirrus Model SR22. CenTex Aerospace, Inc. plans to install a Teledyne Continental Motors model IOF–550–N engine in the Cirrus Design Corporation Model SR–22 airplane. This type certified engine, approved under FAA Type Certificate E3SO; Revision 7, dated E:\FR\FM\03AUR1.SGM 03AUR1 43138 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 149 / Friday, August 3, 2007 / Rules and Regulations rmajette on PROD1PC64 with RULES February 4, 2002, incorporates Full Authority Digital Electronic Controls (FADEC) fuel and ignition control system. Even though the engine control system is certificated as part of the engine and does not interface or share data with any of the airplane systems, the installation of an engine with an electronic control system requires evaluation due to critical environmental effects and possible effects on or by other airplane systems. For example, indirect effects of lightning, radio interference with other airplane electronic systems, shared engine and airplane data and power sources. The Cirrus Model SR22 is currently approved under Type Certificate No. A00009CH. The Cirrus Model SR22 is a 3,400 pound single-engine, four-place, fixed-gear airplane powered by a 310 hp reciprocating engine. It has a conventional tractor configuration and uses composites for the structure. Some unique features of the SR–22 include sidestick controls and a ballistic recovery system, and a single combination throttle/propeller control lever. Type Certification Basis Under the provisions of § 21.101, Centex Aerospace, Inc. must show that the Cirrus Model SR22, as changed, continues to meet the applicable provisions of the regulations incorporated by reference in Type Certificate No. A00009CH, or the applicable regulations in effect on the date of application for the change. The regulations incorporated by reference in the type certificate are commonly referred to as the ‘‘original type certification basis.’’ The regulations incorporated by reference in Type Certificate No. A00009CH are as follows: Model SR22: Part 23 of the Federal Aviation Regulations effective February 1, 1965, as amended by 23–1 through 23–53, except as follows: 23.301 through Amendment 47 23.855, 23.1326, 23.1359, not applicable Federal Aviation Regulation 36, dated December 1, 1969, as amended by current amendment as of the date of type Certification. Equivalent Safety Items: Equivalent Levels of Safety finding (ACE–96–5) made per the provisions of 14 CFR part 23, § 23.221; Refer to FAA ELOS letter dated June 10, 1998 for models SR20, SR22. Equivalent Levels of Safety finding (ACE–00–09) made per the provisions of 14 CFR part 23, VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:45 Aug 02, 2007 Jkt 211001 §§ 23.1143(g) and 23.1147(b); Refer to FAA ELOS letter dated September 11, 2000 for model SR22. Special Conditions: 23–ACE–88 for ballistic parachute. 23–134–SC for protection of systems for High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF). 23–163–SC for inflatable restraint system. In addition, if the regulations incorporated by reference do not provide adequate standards regarding the change, the applicant must comply with certain regulations in effect on the date of application for the change. If the Administrator finds that the applicable airworthiness regulations (i.e., 14 CFR part 23, § 23.1309) do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for the Model SR22 because of a novel or unusual design feature, special conditions are prescribed under the provisions of § 21.16. The FAA issues special conditions, as defined in § 11.19, under § 11.38 and they become part of the type certification basis under § 21.101. Special conditions are initially applicable to the model for which they are issued. Should the applicant apply for a supplemental type certificate to modify any other model included on the same type certificate to incorporate the same novel or unusual design feature, the special conditions would also apply to the other model. Novel or Unusual Design Features The Centex Aerospace Inc. modified Cirrus Model SR22 will incorporate the following novel or unusual design features: An engine that includes an electronic control system with Full Authority Digital Engine control (FADEC) capability. Many advanced electronic systems are prone to either upsets or damage, or both, at energy levels lower than analog systems. The increasing use of high power radio frequency emitters mandates requirements for improved high intensity radiated fields (HIRF) protection for electrical and electronic equipment. Since the electronic engine control system used on the Centex Aerospace, Inc. modified Cirrus Design Corporation Model SR22 will perform critical functions, provisions for protection from the effects of HIRF should be considered and, if necessary, incorporated into the airplane design data. The FAA policy contained in Notice 8110.71, dated April 2, 1998, establishes the HIRF energy levels that airplanes will be exposed to in service. PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 The guidelines set forth in this notice are the result of an Aircraft Certification Service review of existing policy on HIRF, in light of the ongoing work of the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) Electromagnetic Effects Harmonization Working Group (EEHWG). The EEHWG adopted a set of HIRF environment levels in November 1997 that were agreed upon by the FAA, the Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA), and industry participants. As a result, the HIRF environments in this notice reflect the environment levels recommended by this working group. This notice states that a FADEC is an example of a system that should address the HIRF environments. Even though the control system will be certificated as part of the engine, the installation of an engine with an electronic control system requires evaluation due to the possible effects on or by other airplane systems (e.g., radio interference with other airplane electronic systems, shared engine and airplane power sources). The regulatory requirements in 14 CFR part 23 for evaluating the installation of complex systems, including electronic systems, are contained in § 23.1309. However, when § 23.1309 was developed, the use of electronic control systems for engines was not envisioned; therefore, the § 23.1309 requirements were not applicable to systems certificated as part of the engine (reference § 23.1309(f)(1)). Also, electronic control systems often require inputs from airplane data and power sources and outputs to other airplane systems (e.g., automated cockpit powerplant controls such as mixture setting). Although the parts of the system that are not certificated with the engine could be evaluated using the criteria of § 23.1309, the integral nature of systems such as these makes it unfeasible to evaluate the airplane portion of the system without including the engine portion of the system. However, § 23.1309(f)(1) again prevents complete evaluation of the installed airplane system since evaluation of the engine system’s effects is not required. Therefore, special conditions are issued for the Centex Aerospace, Inc. modified Cirrus Design Corporation Model SR22 to provide HIRF protection. Applicability As discussed above, these special conditions are applicable to the Centex Aerospace, Inc. modified Cirrus Design Corporation Model SR22. Should Centex Aerospace, Inc. apply at a later date for a supplemental type certificate to modify any other model included on Type Certificate No. A00009CH, to incorporate the same novel or unusual E:\FR\FM\03AUR1.SGM 03AUR1 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 149 / Friday, August 3, 2007 / Rules and Regulations design feature, the special conditions would apply to that model as well. Conclusion This action affects only certain novel or unusual design features on one model of airplane. It is not a rule of general applicability and affects only the applicant who applied to the FAA for approval of these features on the airplane. The substance of these special conditions has been subjected to the notice and comment period in several prior instances and has been derived without substantive change from those previously issued. It is unlikely that prior public comment would result in a significant change from the substance contained herein. Therefore, because a delay would significantly affect the certification of the airplane, which is imminent, the FAA has determined that prior public notice and comment are unnecessary and impracticable, and good cause exists for adopting these special conditions upon issuance. The FAA is requesting comments to allow interested persons to submit views that may not have been submitted in response to the prior opportunities for comment described above. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 23 Aircraft, Aviation safety, Signs and symbols. Citation The authority citation for these special conditions is as follows: I Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113 and 44701; 14 CFR 21.16 and 21.101; and 14 CFR 11.38 and 11.19. rmajette on PROD1PC64 with RULES The Special Conditions Accordingly, pursuant to the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the following special conditions are issued as part of the type certification basis for the Centex Aerospace, Inc. modified Cirrus Design Corporation Model SR22. 1. High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. In showing compliance with 14 CFR part 21 and the airworthiness requirements of 14 CFR part 23, protection against hazards caused by exposure to HIRF fields for the full authority digital engine control system, which performs critical functions, must be considered. To prevent this occurrence, the electronic engine control system must be designed and installed to ensure that the operation and operational capabilities of this critical system are not adversely affected when the airplane is exposed to high energy radio fields. VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:16 Aug 02, 2007 Jkt 211001 At this time, the FAA and other airworthiness authorities are unable to precisely define or control the HIRF energy level to which the airplane will be exposed in service; therefore, the FAA hereby defines two acceptable interim methods for complying with the requirement for protection of systems that perform critical functions. (1) The applicant may demonstrate that the operation and operational capability of the installed electrical and electronic systems that perform critical functions are not adversely affected when the aircraft is exposed to the external HIRF threat environment defined in the following table: Frequency Field strength (volts per meter) Peak 10 kHz–100 kHz ....... 100 kHz–500 kHz ..... 500 kHz–2 MHz ........ 2 MHz–30 MHz ......... 30 MHz–70 MHz ....... 70 MHz–100 MHz ..... 100 MHz–200 MHz ... 200 MHz–400 MHz ... 400 MHz–700 MHz ... 700 MHz–1 GHz ....... 1 GHz–2 GHz ........... 2 GHz–4 GHz ........... 4 GHz–6 GHz ........... 6 GHz–8 GHz ........... 8 GHz–12 GHz ......... 12 GHz–18 GHz ....... 18 GHz–40 GHz ....... 50 50 50 100 50 50 100 100 700 700 2000 3000 3000 1000 3000 2000 600 Average 50 50 50 100 50 50 100 100 50 100 200 200 200 200 300 200 200 The field strengths are expressed in terms of peak root-mean-square (rms) values. or, (2) The applicant may demonstrate by a system test and analysis that the electrical and electronic systems that perform critical functions can withstand a minimum threat of 100 volts per meter peak electrical strength, without the benefit of airplane structural shielding, in the frequency range of 10 KHz to 18 GHz. When using this test to show compliance with the HIRF requirements, no credit is given for signal attenuation due to installation. Data used for engine certification may be used, when appropriate, for airplane certification. Issued in Kansas City, Missouri on July 26, 2007. James E. Jackson, Acting Manager, Small Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. E7–14935 Filed 8–2–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 43139 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2006–25927; Directorate Identifier 2006–CE–52–AD; Amendment 39– 15142; AD 2007–16–03] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; M7 Aerospace LP SA226 and SA227 Series Airplanes Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) to supersede AD 98–19–15 R1 and AD 2000–03–17, which apply to M7 Aerospace LP SA226 and SA227 series airplanes equipped with certain pitch trim actuators. AD 98–19–15 R1 currently requires you to incorporate changes into the Limitations Section of the FAA-approved airplane flight manual (AFM) if certain part number (P/ N) pitch trim actuators are installed. AD 2000–03–17 requires repetitive inspections and repetitive replacements of the pitch trim actuator. The repetitive inspection and repetitive replacement times vary depending on the combination of airplane model and pitch trim actuator P/N installed. Since we issued AD 98–19–15 R1 and AD 2000–03–17, we have determined that reliance on critical repetitive inspections on aging commuter-class airplanes carries an unnecessary safety risk when a design change exists that could eliminate or, in certain instances, reduce the number of those critical inspections. Consequently, this AD retains all of the actions of the previously referenced ADs, places life limits on certain P/N pitch trim actuators, and requires the replacement of certain P/N pitch trim actuators with one of an improved design. Once installed, the improved design pitch trim actuator will terminate the AFM limitations in this AD and reduce the repetitive inspection and repetitive replacement requirements. We are issuing this AD to detect excessive freeplay or rod slippage in the pitch trim actuator, which, if not detected and corrected, could result in pitch trim actuator failure. We are also issuing this AD to lessen the severity of pitch upset if a pitch trim actuator mechanical failure occurs. These conditions could lead to possible loss of control. DATES: This AD becomes effective on September 7, 2007. E:\FR\FM\03AUR1.SGM 03AUR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 149 (Friday, August 3, 2007)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 43137-43139]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-14935]


=======================================================================
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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 23

[Docket No. CE272; Special Conditions No. 23-212-SC]


Special Conditions: Centex Aerospace Inc., Cirrus Design 
Corporation Model SR22; Installation of a Full Authority Digital Engine 
Control (FADEC) Engine and the Protection of the System From the 
Effects of High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF)

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final special conditions; request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: These special conditions are issued for the Centex Aerospace 
Inc. modified Cirrus Design Corporation Model SR22. This airplane as 
modified by Centex Aerospace Inc. will have a novel or unusual design 
feature(s) associated with the installation of a full authority digital 
engine control (FADEC) engine. The applicable airworthiness regulations 
do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for this design 
feature. These special conditions contain the additional safety 
standards that the Administrator considers necessary to establish a 
level of safety equivalent to that established by the existing 
airworthiness standards.

DATES: The effective date of these special conditions is July 26, 2007. 
Comments must be received on or before September 4, 2007.

ADDRESSES: Comments may be mailed in duplicate to: Federal Aviation 
Administration (FAA), Regional Counsel, ACE-7, Attention: Rules Docket, 
Docket No. CE272, 901 Locust, Room 506, Kansas City, Missouri 64106, or 
delivered in duplicate to the Regional Counsel at the above address. 
Comments must be marked: Docket No. CE272. Comments may be inspected in 
the Rules Docket weekdays, except Federal holidays, between 7:30 a.m. 
and 4 p.m.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Peter L. Rouse, Federal Aviation 
Administration, Aircraft Certification Service, Small Airplane 
Directorate, ACE-111, 901 Locust, Room 301, Kansas City, Missouri 
64106; telephone: 816-329-4135, fax: 816-329-4090.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FAA has determined that notice and 
opportunity for prior public comment hereon are impracticable because 
these procedures would significantly delay issuance of the design 
approval and thus delivery of the affected aircraft. In addition, the 
substance of these special conditions has been subject to the public 
comment process in several prior instances with no substantive comments 
received. The FAA, therefore, finds that good cause exists for making 
these special conditions effective upon issuance.

Comments Invited

    We invite interested people to take part in this rulemaking by 
sending written comments, data, or views. The most helpful comments 
reference a specific portion of the special conditions, explain the 
reason for any recommended change, and include supporting data. We ask 
that you send us two copies of written comments.
    We will file in the docket all comments we receive, as well as a 
report summarizing each substantive public contact with FAA personnel 
about these special conditions. You can inspect the docket before and 
after the comment closing date. If you wish to review the docket in 
person, go to the address in the ADDRESSES section of this preamble 
between 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal 
holidays.
    We will consider all comments we receive by the closing date for 
comments. We will consider comments filed late if it is possible to do 
so without incurring expense or delay. We may change these special 
conditions based on the comments we receive.
    If you want us to let you know we received your comments on these 
special conditions, send us a pre-addressed, stamped postcard on which 
the docket number appears. We will stamp the date on the postcard and 
mail it back to you.

Background

    On March 15, 2004, Centex Aerospace, Inc. applied for a 
supplemental type certificate for the Cirrus Model SR22 to install a 
full authority digital engine control in the Cirrus Model SR22. CenTex 
Aerospace, Inc. plans to install a Teledyne Continental Motors model 
IOF-550-N engine in the Cirrus Design Corporation Model SR-22 airplane. 
This type certified engine, approved under FAA Type Certificate E3SO; 
Revision 7, dated

[[Page 43138]]

February 4, 2002, incorporates Full Authority Digital Electronic 
Controls (FADEC) fuel and ignition control system. Even though the 
engine control system is certificated as part of the engine and does 
not interface or share data with any of the airplane systems, the 
installation of an engine with an electronic control system requires 
evaluation due to critical environmental effects and possible effects 
on or by other airplane systems. For example, indirect effects of 
lightning, radio interference with other airplane electronic systems, 
shared engine and airplane data and power sources.
    The Cirrus Model SR22 is currently approved under Type Certificate 
No. A00009CH. The Cirrus Model SR22 is a 3,400 pound single-engine, 
four-place, fixed-gear airplane powered by a 310 hp reciprocating 
engine. It has a conventional tractor configuration and uses composites 
for the structure. Some unique features of the SR-22 include sidestick 
controls and a ballistic recovery system, and a single combination 
throttle/propeller control lever.

Type Certification Basis

    Under the provisions of Sec.  21.101, Centex Aerospace, Inc. must 
show that the Cirrus Model SR22, as changed, continues to meet the 
applicable provisions of the regulations incorporated by reference in 
Type Certificate No. A00009CH, or the applicable regulations in effect 
on the date of application for the change. The regulations incorporated 
by reference in the type certificate are commonly referred to as the 
``original type certification basis.'' The regulations incorporated by 
reference in Type Certificate No. A00009CH are as follows:

Model SR22: Part 23 of the Federal Aviation Regulations effective 
February 1, 1965, as amended by 23-1 through 23-53, except as follows:
    23.301 through Amendment 47
    23.855, 23.1326, 23.1359, not applicable
    Federal Aviation Regulation 36, dated December 1, 1969, as amended 
by current amendment as of the date of type Certification.
Equivalent Safety Items:
    Equivalent Levels of Safety finding (ACE-96-5) made per the 
provisions of 14 CFR part 23, Sec.  23.221; Refer to FAA ELOS letter 
dated June 10, 1998 for models SR20, SR22.
    Equivalent Levels of Safety finding (ACE-00-09) made per the 
provisions of 14 CFR part 23, Sec. Sec.  23.1143(g) and 23.1147(b); 
Refer to FAA ELOS letter dated September 11, 2000 for model SR22.
Special Conditions:
    23-ACE-88 for ballistic parachute.
    23-134-SC for protection of systems for High Intensity Radiated 
Fields (HIRF).
    23-163-SC for inflatable restraint system.

    In addition, if the regulations incorporated by reference do not 
provide adequate standards regarding the change, the applicant must 
comply with certain regulations in effect on the date of application 
for the change.
    If the Administrator finds that the applicable airworthiness 
regulations (i.e., 14 CFR part 23, Sec.  23.1309) do not contain 
adequate or appropriate safety standards for the Model SR22 because of 
a novel or unusual design feature, special conditions are prescribed 
under the provisions of Sec.  21.16.
    The FAA issues special conditions, as defined in Sec.  11.19, under 
Sec.  11.38 and they become part of the type certification basis under 
Sec.  21.101.
    Special conditions are initially applicable to the model for which 
they are issued. Should the applicant apply for a supplemental type 
certificate to modify any other model included on the same type 
certificate to incorporate the same novel or unusual design feature, 
the special conditions would also apply to the other model.

Novel or Unusual Design Features

    The Centex Aerospace Inc. modified Cirrus Model SR22 will 
incorporate the following novel or unusual design features:
    An engine that includes an electronic control system with Full 
Authority Digital Engine control (FADEC) capability.
    Many advanced electronic systems are prone to either upsets or 
damage, or both, at energy levels lower than analog systems. The 
increasing use of high power radio frequency emitters mandates 
requirements for improved high intensity radiated fields (HIRF) 
protection for electrical and electronic equipment. Since the 
electronic engine control system used on the Centex Aerospace, Inc. 
modified Cirrus Design Corporation Model SR22 will perform critical 
functions, provisions for protection from the effects of HIRF should be 
considered and, if necessary, incorporated into the airplane design 
data. The FAA policy contained in Notice 8110.71, dated April 2, 1998, 
establishes the HIRF energy levels that airplanes will be exposed to in 
service. The guidelines set forth in this notice are the result of an 
Aircraft Certification Service review of existing policy on HIRF, in 
light of the ongoing work of the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee 
(ARAC) Electromagnetic Effects Harmonization Working Group (EEHWG). The 
EEHWG adopted a set of HIRF environment levels in November 1997 that 
were agreed upon by the FAA, the Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA), and 
industry participants. As a result, the HIRF environments in this 
notice reflect the environment levels recommended by this working 
group. This notice states that a FADEC is an example of a system that 
should address the HIRF environments.
    Even though the control system will be certificated as part of the 
engine, the installation of an engine with an electronic control system 
requires evaluation due to the possible effects on or by other airplane 
systems (e.g., radio interference with other airplane electronic 
systems, shared engine and airplane power sources). The regulatory 
requirements in 14 CFR part 23 for evaluating the installation of 
complex systems, including electronic systems, are contained in Sec.  
23.1309. However, when Sec.  23.1309 was developed, the use of 
electronic control systems for engines was not envisioned; therefore, 
the Sec.  23.1309 requirements were not applicable to systems 
certificated as part of the engine (reference Sec.  23.1309(f)(1)). 
Also, electronic control systems often require inputs from airplane 
data and power sources and outputs to other airplane systems (e.g., 
automated cockpit powerplant controls such as mixture setting). 
Although the parts of the system that are not certificated with the 
engine could be evaluated using the criteria of Sec.  23.1309, the 
integral nature of systems such as these makes it unfeasible to 
evaluate the airplane portion of the system without including the 
engine portion of the system. However, Sec.  23.1309(f)(1) again 
prevents complete evaluation of the installed airplane system since 
evaluation of the engine system's effects is not required.
    Therefore, special conditions are issued for the Centex Aerospace, 
Inc. modified Cirrus Design Corporation Model SR22 to provide HIRF 
protection.

Applicability

    As discussed above, these special conditions are applicable to the 
Centex Aerospace, Inc. modified Cirrus Design Corporation Model SR22. 
Should Centex Aerospace, Inc. apply at a later date for a supplemental 
type certificate to modify any other model included on Type Certificate 
No. A00009CH, to incorporate the same novel or unusual

[[Page 43139]]

design feature, the special conditions would apply to that model as 
well.

Conclusion

    This action affects only certain novel or unusual design features 
on one model of airplane. It is not a rule of general applicability and 
affects only the applicant who applied to the FAA for approval of these 
features on the airplane.
    The substance of these special conditions has been subjected to the 
notice and comment period in several prior instances and has been 
derived without substantive change from those previously issued. It is 
unlikely that prior public comment would result in a significant change 
from the substance contained herein. Therefore, because a delay would 
significantly affect the certification of the airplane, which is 
imminent, the FAA has determined that prior public notice and comment 
are unnecessary and impracticable, and good cause exists for adopting 
these special conditions upon issuance. The FAA is requesting comments 
to allow interested persons to submit views that may not have been 
submitted in response to the prior opportunities for comment described 
above.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 23

    Aircraft, Aviation safety, Signs and symbols.

Citation

0
The authority citation for these special conditions is as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113 and 44701; 14 CFR 21.16 and 
21.101; and 14 CFR 11.38 and 11.19.

The Special Conditions

    Accordingly, pursuant to the authority delegated to me by the 
Administrator, the following special conditions are issued as part of 
the type certification basis for the Centex Aerospace, Inc. modified 
Cirrus Design Corporation Model SR22.
    1. High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. In showing 
compliance with 14 CFR part 21 and the airworthiness requirements of 14 
CFR part 23, protection against hazards caused by exposure to HIRF 
fields for the full authority digital engine control system, which 
performs critical functions, must be considered. To prevent this 
occurrence, the electronic engine control system must be designed and 
installed to ensure that the operation and operational capabilities of 
this critical system are not adversely affected when the airplane is 
exposed to high energy radio fields.
    At this time, the FAA and other airworthiness authorities are 
unable to precisely define or control the HIRF energy level to which 
the airplane will be exposed in service; therefore, the FAA hereby 
defines two acceptable interim methods for complying with the 
requirement for protection of systems that perform critical functions.
    (1) The applicant may demonstrate that the operation and 
operational capability of the installed electrical and electronic 
systems that perform critical functions are not adversely affected when 
the aircraft is exposed to the external HIRF threat environment defined 
in the following table:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                       Field strength
                                                      (volts per meter)
                     Frequency                     ---------------------
                                                       Peak     Average
------------------------------------------------------------------------
10 kHz-100 kHz....................................         50         50
100 kHz-500 kHz...................................         50         50
500 kHz-2 MHz.....................................         50         50
2 MHz-30 MHz......................................        100        100
30 MHz-70 MHz.....................................         50         50
70 MHz-100 MHz....................................         50         50
100 MHz-200 MHz...................................        100        100
200 MHz-400 MHz...................................        100        100
400 MHz-700 MHz...................................        700         50
700 MHz-1 GHz.....................................        700        100
1 GHz-2 GHz.......................................       2000        200
2 GHz-4 GHz.......................................       3000        200
4 GHz-6 GHz.......................................       3000        200
6 GHz-8 GHz.......................................       1000        200
8 GHz-12 GHz......................................       3000        300
12 GHz-18 GHz.....................................       2000        200
18 GHz-40 GHz.....................................        600        200
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The field strengths are expressed in terms of peak root-mean-square
  (rms) values.

or,

    (2) The applicant may demonstrate by a system test and analysis 
that the electrical and electronic systems that perform critical 
functions can withstand a minimum threat of 100 volts per meter peak 
electrical strength, without the benefit of airplane structural 
shielding, in the frequency range of 10 KHz to 18 GHz. When using this 
test to show compliance with the HIRF requirements, no credit is given 
for signal attenuation due to installation. Data used for engine 
certification may be used, when appropriate, for airplane 
certification.

    Issued in Kansas City, Missouri on July 26, 2007.
James E. Jackson,
Acting Manager, Small Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification 
Service.
[FR Doc. E7-14935 Filed 8-2-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P