Determination Under the African Growth and Opportunity Act, 39607-39608 [E7-14009]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 138 / Thursday, July 19, 2007 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648–XB48 Marine Mammals; File No. 932–1489 National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; issuance of permit amendment. cprice-sewell on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES AGENCY: SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the NMFS Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program has been issued an amendment to scientific research and enhancement Permit No. 932–1489–08. ADDRESSES: The amendment and related documents are available for review upon written request or by appointment in the following office(s): see SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Amy Sloan, Dr. Tammy Adams, or Carrie Hubard, (301)713–2289. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The requested amendment has been granted under the authority of the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1361 et seq.), the regulations governing the taking and importing of marine mammals (50 CFR part 216), the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA; 16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), the regulations governing the taking, importing, and exporting of endangered and threatened species (50 CFR 222–226), and the Fur Seal Act of 1966, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1151 et seq.). Permit No. 932–1489–08 (70 FR 38883) authorizes the NMFS Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program to carry out activities pursuant to Title IV of the MMPA (16 U.S.C. 1421 et seq.), including activities directed on threatened and endangered marine mammals, and import and export activities. This amendment (Permit No. 932–1489–09) extends the expiration date of the permit one year, to June 30, 2008. Issuance of this permit amendment, as required by the ESA, was based on a finding that such permit amendment: (1) was applied for in good faith; (2) will not operate to the disadvantage of such endangered species; and (3) is consistent with the purposes and policies set forth in section 2 of the ESA. The amendment and related documents are available for review in the following office(s): VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:31 Jul 18, 2007 Jkt 211001 Permits, Conservation and Education Division, Office of Protected Resources, NMFS, 1315 East-West Highway, Room 13705, Silver Spring, MD 20910; phone (301)713–2289; fax (301)427–2521; Northwest Region, NMFS, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, BIN C15700, Bldg. 1, Seattle, WA 98115–0700; phone (206)526–6150; fax (206)526–6426; Alaska Region, NMFS, P.O. Box 21668, Juneau, AK 99802–1668; phone (907)586–7221; fax (907)586–7249; Southwest Region, NMFS, 501 West Ocean Blvd., Suite 4200, Long Beach, CA 90802–4213; phone (562)980–4001; fax (562)980–4018; Pacific Islands Region, NMFS, 1601 Kapiolani Blvd., Rm 1110, Honolulu, HI 96814–4700; phone (808)973–2935; fax (808)973–2941; Northeast Region, NMFS, One Blackburn Drive, Gloucester, MA 01930–2298; phone (978)281–9300; fax (978)281–9394; and Southeast Region, NMFS, 263 13th Avenue South, Saint Petersburg, Florida 33701; phone (727)824–5312; fax (727)824–5309. Dated: July 12, 2007. P. Michael Payne, Chief, Permits, Conservation and Education Division, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service. [FR Doc. E7–13949 Filed 7–18–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–22–S COMMITTEE FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS Determination Under the African Growth and Opportunity Act July 13, 2007. Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA). ACTION: Directive to the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA) has determined that certain textile and apparel goods from South Africa shall be treated as ‘‘handloomed, handmade, folklore articles, or ethnic printed fabrics’’ and qualify for preferential treatment under the African Growth and Opportunity Act. Imports of eligible products from South Africa with an appropriate visa will qualify for duty-free treatment. EFFECTIVE DATE: July 30, 2007. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Anna Flaaten, International Trade Specialist, Office of Textiles and Apparel, U.S. Department of Commerce, (202) 482-3400. PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 39607 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Authority: Sections 112(a) and 112(b)(6) of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (Title I of the Trade and Development Act of 2000, Pub. L. No. 106-200) (‘‘AGOA’’), as amended by section 7(c) of the AGOA Acceleration Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-274) (‘‘AGOA Acceleration Act’’) (19 U.S.C. §§ 3721(a) and (b)(6)); Sections 2 and 5 of Executive Order No. 13191 of January 17, 2001; Sections 25-27 and Paras. 13-14 of Presidential Proclamation 7912 of June 29, 2005. AGOA provides preferential tariff treatment for imports of certain textile and apparel products of beneficiary subSaharan African countries, including handloomed, handmade, or folklore articles of a beneficiary country that are certified as such by the competent authority in the beneficiary country. The AGOA Acceleration Act further expanded AGOA by adding ethnic printed fabrics to the list of textile and apparel products made in the beneficiary sub-Saharan African countries that may be eligible for the preferential treatment described in section 112(a) of the AGOA. In Executive Order 13191 (January 17, 2001) and Presidential Proclamation 7912 (June 29, 2005), the President authorized CITA to consult with beneficiary sub-Saharan African countries and to determine which, if any, particular textile and apparel goods shall be treated as being handloomed, handmade, folklore articles, or ethnic printed fabrics. (66 FR 7271-72 and 70 FR 37959, 37961 & 63). In a letter to the Commissioner of Customs dated January 18, 2001, the United States Trade Representative directed Customs to require that importers provide an appropriate export visa from a beneficiary sub-Saharan African country to obtain preferential treatment under section 112(a) of the AGOA (66 FR 7837). The first digit of the visa number corresponds to one of nine groupings of textile and apparel products that are eligible for preferential tariff treatment. Grouping ‘‘9’’ is reserved for handmade, handloomed, folklore articles, or ethnic printed fabrics. CITA has consulted with South African authorities and has determined that handloomed fabrics, handloomed articles (e.g., handloomed rugs, scarves, place mats, and tablecloths), handmade articles made from handloomed fabrics, and the ethnic printed fabrics described in Annex A to this notice, if produced in and exported from South Africa, are eligible for preferential tariff treatment under section 112(a) of the AGOA, as amended. After further consultations with South African authorities, CITA E:\FR\FM\19JYN1.SGM 19JYN1 39608 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 138 / Thursday, July 19, 2007 / Notices may determine that additional textile and apparel goods shall be treated as folklore articles. In the letter published below, CITA directs the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection to allow duty-free entry of such products under U.S. Harmonized Tariff Schedule subheading 9819.11.27 if accompanied by an appropriate AGOA visa in grouping ‘‘9’’. R. Matthew Priest, Chairman, Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements C) classifiable under subheading 5208.52.30 1 or 5208.52.40 2 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States D) contains designs, symbols, and other characteristics of African prints normally produced for and sold in Africa by the piece. E) made from fabric woven in the U.S. using U.S. yarn or woven in one or more eligible sub-Saharan beneficiary countries using U.S or African yarn F) printed, including waxed, in one or more eligible sub-Saharan beneficiary countries [FR Doc. E7–14009 Filed 7–18–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–DR–S July 13, 2007. cprice-sewell on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES Commissioner of Customs, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Washington, DC 20229. Dear Commissioner: The Committee for the Implementation of Textiles Agreements (‘‘CITA’’), pursuant to Sections 112(a) and (b)(6) of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (Title I of the Trade and Development Act of 2000, Pub. L. No. 106-200) (‘‘AGOA’’), as amended by Section 7(c) of the AGOA Acceleration Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-274) (‘‘AGOA Acceleration Act’’) (19 U.S.C. §§ 3721(a) and (b)(6)), Executive Order No. 13191 of January 17, 2001, and Presidential Proclamation 7912 of June 29, 2005, has determined, effective on July 30, 2007, that the following articles shall be treated as ‘‘handloomed, handmade, folklore articles, and ethnic printed fabrics’’ under the AGOA: (a) handloomed fabrics, handloomed articles (e.g., handloomed rugs, scarves, placemats, and tablecloths), and handmade articles made from handloomed fabrics, if made in South Africa from fabric handloomed in South Africa; and (b) ethnic printed fabrics described in Annex A, if made in South Africa. Such articles are eligible for duty-free treatment only if entered under subheading 9819.11.27 and accompanied by a properly completed visa for product grouping ‘‘9’’, in accordance with the provisions of the Visa Arrangement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United States Concerning Textile and Apparel Articles Claiming Preferential Tariff Treatment under Section 112 of the Trade and Development Act of 2000. After further consultations with South African authorities, CITA may determine that additional textile and apparel goods shall be treated as folklore articles. Sincerely, R. Matthew Priest, Chairman, Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements. Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management, invites comments on the proposed information collection requests as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. DATES: Interested persons are invited to submit comments on or before September 17, 2007. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 3506 of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35) requires that the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provide interested Federal agencies and the public an early opportunity to comment on information collection requests. OMB may amend or waive the requirement for public consultation to the extent that public participation in the approval process would defeat the purpose of the information collection, violate State or Federal law, or substantially interfere with any agency’s ability to perform its statutory obligations. The IC Clearance Official, Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management, publishes that notice containing proposed information collection requests prior to submission of these requests to OMB. Each proposed information collection, grouped by office, contains the following: (1) Type of review requested, e.g. new, revision, extension, existing or reinstatement; (2) Title; (3) Summary of the collection; (4) Description of the need for, and proposed use of, the ANNEX A: South African Ethnic Printed Fabrics Each ethnic print must meet all of the criteria listed below: A) selvedge on both edges B) width of less than 50 inches 1 printed plain weave fabrics of cotton, 85% or more cotton by weight, weighing over 100g/m2 but not more than 200 g/m2, of yarn number 42 or lower 2 printed plain weave fabrics of cotton, 85% or more cotton by weight, weighing over 100g/m2 but not more than 200g/m2, of yarn numbers 43-68 VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:31 Jul 18, 2007 Jkt 211001 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests AGENCY: Department of Education. SUMMARY: The IC Clearance Official, PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 information; (5) Respondents and frequency of collection; and (6) Reporting and/or Recordkeeping burden. OMB invites public comment. The Department of Education is especially interested in public comment addressing the following issues: (1) Is this collection necessary to the proper functions of the Department; (2) will this information be processed and used in a timely manner; (3) is the estimate of burden accurate; (4) how might the Department enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (5) how might the Department minimize the burden of this collection on the respondents, including through the use of information technology. Dated: July 12, 2007. Angela C. Arrington, IC Clearance Official, Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management. Institute of Education Sciences Type of Review: New. Title: Assessment Accommodations for English Language Learners. Frequency: Annually. Affected Public: Individuals or household. Reporting and Recordkeeping Hour Burden: Responses: 3,667. Burden Hours: 397. Abstract: This study will examine the effect of a test accommodation and its impact on the validity of assessments for English language learners (ELLs). Specifically, it will examine the ways in which linguistic modification affects students’ ability to access content (e.g. math) during testing. Linguistic modification is theory-based process in which the language in test items, directions, and/or response options are modified in ways that clarify and simplify the text without simplifying or significantly altering the construct tested. By comparing the effects of linguistic modification on the performance of ELL students with that of English language proficient general education students without disabilities (non-ELL/non-SD), this study aims to increase understanding of the effects of an accommodation—one that holds promise as a means of decreasing the achievement gap between non-ELL/nonSD and ELL students—on construct validity, differential validity, and incremental validity of achievement test scores. While the initial phase of this study focuses on instrument refinement and validation, the second phase uses experimental design to examine the effectiveness of this accommodation for E:\FR\FM\19JYN1.SGM 19JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 138 (Thursday, July 19, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 39607-39608]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-14009]


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COMMITTEE FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF TEXTILE AGREEMENTS


Determination Under the African Growth and Opportunity Act

July 13, 2007.
AGENCY: Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA).

ACTION: Directive to the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection.

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SUMMARY: The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements 
(CITA) has determined that certain textile and apparel goods from South 
Africa shall be treated as ``handloomed, handmade, folklore articles, 
or ethnic printed fabrics'' and qualify for preferential treatment 
under the African Growth and Opportunity Act. Imports of eligible 
products from South Africa with an appropriate visa will qualify for 
duty-free treatment.

EFFECTIVE DATE: July 30, 2007.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Anna Flaaten, International Trade 
Specialist, Office of Textiles and Apparel, U.S. Department of 
Commerce, (202) 482-3400.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

    Authority: Sections 112(a) and 112(b)(6) of the African Growth 
and Opportunity Act (Title I of the Trade and Development Act of 
2000, Pub. L. No. 106-200) (``AGOA''), as amended by section 7(c) of 
the AGOA Acceleration Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-274) (``AGOA 
Acceleration Act'') (19 U.S.C. Sec. Sec.  3721(a) and (b)(6)); 
Sections 2 and 5 of Executive Order No. 13191 of January 17, 2001; 
Sections 25-27 and Paras. 13-14 of Presidential Proclamation 7912 of 
June 29, 2005.
    AGOA provides preferential tariff treatment for imports of certain 
textile and apparel products of beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
countries, including handloomed, handmade, or folklore articles of a 
beneficiary country that are certified as such by the competent 
authority in the beneficiary country. The AGOA Acceleration Act further 
expanded AGOA by adding ethnic printed fabrics to the list of textile 
and apparel products made in the beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
countries that may be eligible for the preferential treatment described 
in section 112(a) of the AGOA. In Executive Order 13191 (January 17, 
2001) and Presidential Proclamation 7912 (June 29, 2005), the President 
authorized CITA to consult with beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
countries and to determine which, if any, particular textile and 
apparel goods shall be treated as being handloomed, handmade, folklore 
articles, or ethnic printed fabrics. (66 FR 7271-72 and 70 FR 37959, 
37961 & 63).
    In a letter to the Commissioner of Customs dated January 18, 2001, 
the United States Trade Representative directed Customs to require that 
importers provide an appropriate export visa from a beneficiary sub-
Saharan African country to obtain preferential treatment under section 
112(a) of the AGOA (66 FR 7837). The first digit of the visa number 
corresponds to one of nine groupings of textile and apparel products 
that are eligible for preferential tariff treatment. Grouping ``9'' is 
reserved for handmade, handloomed, folklore articles, or ethnic printed 
fabrics.
    CITA has consulted with South African authorities and has 
determined that handloomed fabrics, handloomed articles (e.g., 
handloomed rugs, scarves, place mats, and tablecloths), handmade 
articles made from handloomed fabrics, and the ethnic printed fabrics 
described in Annex A to this notice, if produced in and exported from 
South Africa, are eligible for preferential tariff treatment under 
section 112(a) of the AGOA, as amended. After further consultations 
with South African authorities, CITA

[[Page 39608]]

may determine that additional textile and apparel goods shall be 
treated as folklore articles. In the letter published below, CITA 
directs the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection to allow 
duty-free entry of such products under U.S. Harmonized Tariff Schedule 
subheading 9819.11.27 if accompanied by an appropriate AGOA visa in 
grouping ``9''.

R. Matthew Priest,
Chairman, Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements.

Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements

July 13, 2007.

Commissioner of Customs,
U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Washington, DC 20229.
    Dear Commissioner: The Committee for the Implementation of 
Textiles Agreements (``CITA''), pursuant to Sections 112(a) and 
(b)(6) of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (Title I of the 
Trade and Development Act of 2000, Pub. L. No. 106-200) (``AGOA''), 
as amended by Section 7(c) of the AGOA Acceleration Act of 2004 
(Pub. L. 108-274) (``AGOA Acceleration Act'') (19 U.S.C. Sec. Sec.  
3721(a) and (b)(6)), Executive Order No. 13191 of January 17, 2001, 
and Presidential Proclamation 7912 of June 29, 2005, has determined, 
effective on July 30, 2007, that the following articles shall be 
treated as ``handloomed, handmade, folklore articles, and ethnic 
printed fabrics'' under the AGOA: (a) handloomed fabrics, handloomed 
articles (e.g., handloomed rugs, scarves, placemats, and 
tablecloths), and handmade articles made from handloomed fabrics, if 
made in South Africa from fabric handloomed in South Africa; and (b) 
ethnic printed fabrics described in Annex A, if made in South 
Africa. Such articles are eligible for duty-free treatment only if 
entered under subheading 9819.11.27 and accompanied by a properly 
completed visa for product grouping ``9'', in accordance with the 
provisions of the Visa Arrangement between the Government of the 
Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United States 
Concerning Textile and Apparel Articles Claiming Preferential Tariff 
Treatment under Section 112 of the Trade and Development Act of 
2000. After further consultations with South African authorities, 
CITA may determine that additional textile and apparel goods shall 
be treated as folklore articles.
    Sincerely,
R. Matthew Priest,
Chairman, Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements.

ANNEX A: South African Ethnic Printed Fabrics
Each ethnic print must meet all of the criteria listed below:
    A) selvedge on both edges
    B) width of less than 50 inches
    C) classifiable under subheading 5208.52.30 \1\ or 5208.52.40 
\2\ of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States
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    \1\ printed plain weave fabrics of cotton, 85% or more cotton by 
weight, weighing over 100g/m2 but not more than 200 g/m2, of yarn 
number 42 or lower
    \2\ printed plain weave fabrics of cotton, 85% or more cotton by 
weight, weighing over 100g/m2 but not more than 200g/m2, of yarn 
numbers 43-68
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    D) contains designs, symbols, and other characteristics of 
African prints normally produced for and sold in Africa by the 
piece.
    E) made from fabric woven in the U.S. using U.S. yarn or woven 
in one or more eligible sub-Saharan beneficiary countries using U.S 
or African yarn
    F) printed, including waxed, in one or more eligible sub-Saharan 
beneficiary countries
[FR Doc. E7-14009 Filed 7-18-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3510-DR-S