Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO, 36030-36031 [E7-12711]

Download as PDF 36030 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 126 / Monday, July 2, 2007 / Notices and ecological processes and functions in the Tomales Bay Watershed.’’ All written comments received and a summary of commentary from the January 25, 2007, public meeting are available for inspection at the Seashore Administration Building, 1 Bear Valley Road, Point Reyes Station, CA. Substantive comments and responses are documented in the FEIS/EIR. Copies of the FEIS/EIR may be obtained from the Superintendent, Point Reyes National Seashore, Point Reyes, CA 94956, Attn: Giacomini Wetlands Restoration Project, or by e-mail request to: pore_planning@nps.gov (in the subject line, type: Giacomini Wetlands Restoration Project). The document will be sent directly to those who have requested it, and also will be posted on the Internet at the Seashore’s Web site http://www.nps.gov/pore; and both the printed document and digital version on compact disk will be available at the park headquarters and local libraries. Decision: As a delegated EIS/EIR, the official responsible for the final decision is the Regional Director, Pacific West Region. A Record of Decision, fully documenting the entire conservation planning and environmental decisionmaking process, will be prepared not sooner than 30 days following publication in the Federal Register of the EPA’s notice of filing and availability of the Final EIS/EIR. Subsequently and prior to implementation, notice of approval of the Record of Decision will likewise be published in the Federal Register, as well as announced via local and regional news media. Following approval of the Giacomini Wetlands Restoration Project, the official responsible for project implementation will be the Superintendent, Point Reyes National Seashore. Dated: April 25, 2007. George J. Turnbull, Acting Regional Director, Pacific West Region. [FR Doc. E7–12714 Filed 6–29–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–FW–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Pierce College District, Lakewood, WA; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. jlentini on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003 (5), of the VerDate Aug<31>2005 22:57 Jun 29, 2007 Jkt 211001 completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Pierce College District, Lakewood, WA. The human remains were removed from site 45–PI–07, also known as the Purdy 1 site, at Carr Inlet, Pierce County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. This notice corrects the number of tribes that were determined to be culturally affiliated in a Notice of Inventory Completion previously published in the Federal Register of November 22, 2006 (FR Doc E6–19790, pages 67634–67635) by adding the Nisqually Indian Tribe of the Nisqually Reservation, Washington. After publication in the Federal Register of the Notice of Inventory Completion, Pierce College District determined that the Nisqually Indian Tribe of the Nisqually Reservation, Washington were also culturally affiliated with the Native American human remains from site 45–PI–07, also known as the Purdy 1 site, at Carr Inlet, Pierce County, WA. In the Federal Register of November 22, 2006, on page 67634, paragraph number 5, is corrected by substituting the following: Site 45–PI–07 is a shell mound measuring 5 feet high, 30 feet wide, and 120 feet long. Osteological and archeological analysis indicate that the human remains removed from site 45– PI–07 are of Native American ancestry, based on the presence of extreme degrees of dental wear, marked shoveling of the exposed permanent incisors, blunt nasal sills, rounded chins, squatting facets on the talus, and their flex-kneed burial position, and site context. Archeological materials recovered from the site indicate a wide range of use during the prehistoric and historic periods. Site 45–PI–07 is located within the area long occupied by the Shotlemamish, a Southern Lushootseed speaking group. Members of the Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington speak the Southern Lushootseed language. Around 1870s, remaining Shotlemamish, in what is now the Purdy I area, moved to the Puyallup Reservation where there were already Shotlemamish living on the reservation. Officials of Pierce College have reasonably determined that there is also a shared group identity through PO 00000 Frm 00064 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 marriage between the Burley Lagoon, Purdy Washington Shotlemamish and Nisqually Indian Tribe of the Nisqually Reservation, Washington. Descendants of the Shotlemamish are members of the Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington. Officials of the Pierce College District have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 29 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Pierce College District also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Nisqually Indian Tribe of the Nisqually Reservation, Washington and Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington. Lastly, officials of the Pierce College District have determined that there is a preponderance of the evidence in favor of the Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington’s claim. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Chris MacKersie, District Director of Safety & Security and Assistant Director of Facilities, Pierce College District, 9401 Farwest Drive SW, Lakewood, WA 98498, telephone (253) 912–3655, before August 1, 2007. Repatriation of the human remains to the Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Pierce College District is responsible for notifying the Nisqually Indian Tribe of the Nisqually Reservation, Washington and Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation, Washington that this notice has been published. Dated: June 13, 2007 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–12712 Filed 6–29–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act E:\FR\FM\02JYN1.SGM 02JYN1 jlentini on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 126 / Monday, July 2, 2007 / Notices (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO. The human remains were removed from Montezuma County, CO. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University of Colorado Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah; and Ute Mountain Ute Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah. In 1954, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were excavated by Hod Stevenson on his property at the edge of Yellow Jacket Canyon, Montezuma County, CO. In 1959, Mr. Stevenson donated the human remains and associated funerary objects to the museum. No known individual was identified. The seven associated funerary objects are two plain–weave, diyugi–style Navajo blankets; one coil of braided rawhide; one small piece of twined hair; one basket in the shape of a dipper; one lot of juniper bark; and one lot of charcoal. A piece of rolled leather was not collected when the burial was excavated. The human remains were found in a flexed, seated position facing east and wrapped in two plain–weave, diyugi– style Navajo blankets in an east–facing rock shelter, and appear to have been placed in a shallow pit. The burial had been covered with juniper bark and the pit had been filled with sandy sediment. In 1959, University of Colorado Museum curator, Joe Ben Wheat, visited the site and found a small charcoal pictograph of a long–legged horse and rider at the back of the rock shelter from which the burial had been removed. Based on the burial context, the human remains are Native American. The Indian Land Areas Judicially Established 1978 Map indicates the claim to land in southwestern Colorado is based upon historic use by the Ute and Navajo tribes. The style of the drawing found in the rock shelter is similar to historic Ute pictographs (Legacy on Stone, Sally J. Cole, 1990). An analysis of the blanket fragments VerDate Aug<31>2005 22:57 Jun 29, 2007 Jkt 211001 places their manufacture at approximately A.D. 1800. Navajo diyugi–style blankets were commonly traded to northern allies in Colorado, such as the Ute, in the late 18th century. In the last 250 years, the presence of the Ute tribes in the area of western Colorado has been historically documented by both Spanish and U.S. records. The present northern boundary of the Ute Mountain Reservation is only 12 miles to the south of the burial site. In consultations, representatives of the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado and Ute Mountain Ute Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah provided evidence in the form of histories and oral traditions that place their tribes in a very large area that encompasses the location of the burial. Representatives from both Indian tribes identified details about the burial as possibly Ute. At the estimated time of the burial, historical accounts located the Ute bands whose descendants are now members of the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado and Ute Mountain Ute Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah in an area stretching from southwestern to south central Colorado to northwestern New Mexico. Historical accounts placed the other Ute bands whose descendants are members of the Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah in an area between the Gunnison River in Colorado and the Uintah Basin in Utah in A.D. 1800. Officials of the University of Colorado Museum reasonably believe the human remains are Ute based on the preponderance of the evidence including geographical, archeological, historical, oral–tradition, and expert opinion. Descendants of the Ute are members of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah; and Ute Mountain Ute Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah Officials of the University of Colorado Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the University of Colorado Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the seven objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the University of Colorado Museum also have determined that, PO 00000 Frm 00065 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 36031 pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah; and Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Steve Lekson, Curator of Anthropology, University of Colorado Museum, Henderson Building, Campus Box 218, Boulder, CO 80309–0218, telephone (303) 492–6671, before August 1, 2007. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah; and Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. University of Colorado Museum is responsible for notifying the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah; and Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah that this notice has been published. Dated: June 11, 2007 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–12711 Filed 6–29–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO; Correction National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; correction. AGENCY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003 (5), of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO. The human remains and cultural items were removed from Adams, Arapahoe, Baca, Boulder, Fremont, Huerfano, Larimer, E:\FR\FM\02JYN1.SGM 02JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 126 (Monday, July 2, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 36030-36031]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-12711]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, 
Boulder, CO

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act

[[Page 36031]]

(NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human 
remains in the possession of the University of Colorado Museum, 
Boulder, CO. The human remains were removed from Montezuma County, CO.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University 
of Colorado Museum professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute 
Reservation, Colorado; Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray 
Reservation, Utah; and Ute Mountain Ute Tribe of the Ute Mountain 
Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah.
    In 1954, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were excavated by Hod Stevenson on his property at the edge of Yellow 
Jacket Canyon, Montezuma County, CO. In 1959, Mr. Stevenson donated the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to the museum. No known 
individual was identified. The seven associated funerary objects are 
two plain-weave, diyugi-style Navajo blankets; one coil of braided 
rawhide; one small piece of twined hair; one basket in the shape of a 
dipper; one lot of juniper bark; and one lot of charcoal. A piece of 
rolled leather was not collected when the burial was excavated.
    The human remains were found in a flexed, seated position facing 
east and wrapped in two plain-weave, diyugi-style Navajo blankets in an 
east-facing rock shelter, and appear to have been placed in a shallow 
pit. The burial had been covered with juniper bark and the pit had been 
filled with sandy sediment. In 1959, University of Colorado Museum 
curator, Joe Ben Wheat, visited the site and found a small charcoal 
pictograph of a long-legged horse and rider at the back of the rock 
shelter from which the burial had been removed. Based on the burial 
context, the human remains are Native American.
    The Indian Land Areas Judicially Established 1978 Map indicates the 
claim to land in southwestern Colorado is based upon historic use by 
the Ute and Navajo tribes. The style of the drawing found in the rock 
shelter is similar to historic Ute pictographs (Legacy on Stone, Sally 
J. Cole, 1990). An analysis of the blanket fragments places their 
manufacture at approximately A.D. 1800. Navajo diyugi-style blankets 
were commonly traded to northern allies in Colorado, such as the Ute, 
in the late 18th century. In the last 250 years, the presence of the 
Ute tribes in the area of western Colorado has been historically 
documented by both Spanish and U.S. records. The present northern 
boundary of the Ute Mountain Reservation is only 12 miles to the south 
of the burial site. In consultations, representatives of the Southern 
Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado and Ute 
Mountain Ute Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New 
Mexico & Utah provided evidence in the form of histories and oral 
traditions that place their tribes in a very large area that 
encompasses the location of the burial. Representatives from both 
Indian tribes identified details about the burial as possibly Ute.
    At the estimated time of the burial, historical accounts located 
the Ute bands whose descendants are now members of the Southern Ute 
Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado and Ute Mountain 
Ute Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah 
in an area stretching from southwestern to south central Colorado to 
northwestern New Mexico. Historical accounts placed the other Ute bands 
whose descendants are members of the Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & 
Ouray Reservation, Utah in an area between the Gunnison River in 
Colorado and the Uintah Basin in Utah in A.D. 1800. Officials of the 
University of Colorado Museum reasonably believe the human remains are 
Ute based on the preponderance of the evidence including geographical, 
archeological, historical, oral-tradition, and expert opinion. 
Descendants of the Ute are members of the Southern Ute Reservation, 
Colorado; Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah; and 
Ute Mountain Ute Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New 
Mexico & Utah
    Officials of the University of Colorado Museum have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the University of Colorado Museum also 
have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the seven 
objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the University 
of Colorado Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 
3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be 
reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary objects and the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the 
Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & 
Ouray Reservation, Utah; and Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain 
Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Steve Lekson, Curator of Anthropology, 
University of Colorado Museum, Henderson Building, Campus Box 218, 
Boulder, CO 80309-0218, telephone (303) 492-6671, before August 1, 
2007. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects 
to the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, 
Colorado; Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah; and 
Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New 
Mexico & Utah may proceed after that date if no additional claimants 
come forward.
    University of Colorado Museum is responsible for notifying the 
Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; 
Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah; and Ute 
Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & 
Utah that this notice has been published.

    Dated: June 11, 2007
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E7-12711 Filed 6-29-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S