Notice of Inventory Completion: Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI; Correction, 29173-29174 [E7-10019]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 100 / Thursday, May 24, 2007 / Notices Comments and petitions should be submitted to the Division of Dockets Management. Three copies of any mailed information are to be submitted, except that individuals may submit one copy. Comments are to be identified with the docket number found in brackets in the heading of this document. Comments and petitions may be seen in the Division of Dockets Management between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Dated: May 7, 2007. Jane A. Axelrad, Associate Director for Policy, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. [FR Doc. E7–10052 Filed 5–23–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4160–01–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [UT933–07–4310–DP] Notice of Intent To Prepare Supplemental Draft Resource Management Plans and Environmental Impact Statements for the Vernal and Price Field Offices, Utah Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of intent. rmajette on PROD1PC67 with NOTICES AGENCY: SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Vernal and Price Field Offices, Utah, are preparing Supplemental Draft Resource Management Plans/Environmental Impact Statements (Draft RMP/EIS) to include additional information and analyses of wilderness characteristics on lands outside existing Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs). This information and analysis includes multiple areas in both the Vernal and Price Field Office planning areas. DATES: Because the BLM has previously requested (Federal Register, Volume 66, Number 48, March 12, 2001, pages 14415–14417, and Federal Register, Volume 66, No. 216, November 7, 2001, pages 56343–56344) and received extensive information from the public on issues to be addressed in these RMPs, and because the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) do not require additional scoping for this supplemental draft RMP/EIS process (40 CFR 1502.9(c)( 4), the BLM is not asking for further public information and comment at this time. This issue has been defined in earlier scoping efforts. A 90-day public comment period will be provided upon VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:52 May 23, 2007 Jkt 211001 29173 release of the supplemental draft document EISs. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: National Park Service Shelley Smith, Project Manager, BLM Utah State Office, P.O. Box 45155, Salt Lake City, Utah 84145–0155; telephone: (801) 539–4053; e-mail: shelley_smith@blm.gov. The public may also contact Howard Cleavinger, Assistant Field Manager, BLM Vernal Field Office, 170 South 500 East, Vernal, Utah 84078; telephone: (435) 781–4480; e-mail: howard_cleavinger@blm.gov or Floyd Johnson, Assistant Field Manager, BLM Price Field Office, 125 South 600 West, Price, Utah 84501; telephone: (435) 636–3650; e-mail: floyd_johnson@blm.gov. Or, the public may visit the Price RMP Web site at http://www.blm.gov/rmp/ut/price and the Vernal RMP Web site at http:// www.blm.gov/rmp/ut/vernal. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: There are multiple areas in the Price and Vernal Field Offices, outside of existing wilderness study areas (WSAs), found to have wilderness characteristics in previous inventories. The BLM’s Land Use Planning Handbook (H–1601–1) provides guidance for consideration of non-WSA lands with wilderness characteristics in land use planning. The handbook provides that the BLM consider these lands and resource values in planning, and prescribe measures to protect wilderness characteristics. These characteristics include appearance of naturalness, outstanding opportunities for solitude, or outstanding opportunities for primitive and unconfined recreation. To ensure compliance with the ruling in the court case, Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance et al. v. Gale Norton, in her official capacity as Secretary of the Interior et al. (Utah District Court, Case No. 2:04CV574DAK), regarding the sale and issuance of oil and gas leases on lands outside of existing WSAs with wilderness characteristics, the BLM is supplementing its consideration of nonWSA lands with wilderness characteristics in land use planning. BLM shall ensure that (1) adequate consideration is given to wilderness characteristics in ongoing RMPs, (2) a range of alternatives is analyzed for management of these lands, and (3) an adequate analysis is prepared from which to base decisions for future oil and gas leasing. Dated: April 4, 2007. Jeff Rawson, Associate State Director. [FR Doc. E7–10032 Filed 5–23–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–DQ–P PO 00000 Frm 00054 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Notice of Inventory Completion: Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of a revision to an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum (Bishop Museum), Honolulu, HI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. This notice corrects information reported in a Notice of Inventory Completion for the Bishop Museum published in the Federal Register on August 27, 1997 (FR Doc 97–22736, pages 45437–45438). Officials of the Bishop Museum have determined that 24 of the 34 cultural items published in the original notice do not meet the definition of human remains at 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1) because while these items contain human remains, the items themselves are not considered human remains under NAGPRA definitions. The 24 cultural items that are being removed from the inventory are listed below. In 1889, Joseph S. Emerson sold a wood image from Waimea, O’ahu, to the Bishop Museum. Human hair is incorporated in this object. No known individual was identified. In 1889, a helmet (or wig) incorporating human hair and a refuse container incorporating human teeth and bone were bequeathed to the Bishop Museum by Queen Emma. No known individual was identified. In 1889, a kahili incorporating human bone became part of the original collections of the Bishop Museum. This kahili was given to Bernice Pauahi by Ke’elikolani. No known individual was identified. In 1891, a refuse container incorporating human teeth and a kahili incorporating human bone were acquired with the collections of the Hawaiian National Museum which were E:\FR\FM\24MYN1.SGM 24MYN1 rmajette on PROD1PC67 with NOTICES 29174 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 100 / Thursday, May 24, 2007 / Notices transferred to the Bishop Museum. No further documentation is available. No known individual was identified. In 1892 or before, an image from Kaua’i with human hair was purchased by Bishop Museum Director William T. Brigham on behalf of the Bishop Museum. No known individual was identified. Prior to 1892, an image incorporating human hair was received as a gift by the Bishop Museum from the Trustees of O’ahu College. No known individual was identified. Prior to 1892, two bracelets incorporating human bone were received from an unknown source as part of the original Bishop Museum collections. No known individual was identified. In 1893, a sash with human teeth, a pahu (drum) incorporating human teeth, and a refuse container with human teeth were removed from ’Iolani Palace by the Provisional Government and sent into the collections of the Bishop Museum. No known individual was identified. In 1895, an image incorporating human hair was purchased by the Bishop Museum from the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. No further documentation is available. No known individual was identified. In 1908, an ipu with human teeth from Kohala, HI, was purchased by the Bishop Museum from the estate of William E.H. Deverill. No further information is available. No known individual was identified. In 1910, a sash incorporating human teeth was received by the Bishop Museum as a gift from Queen Lili’uokalani. No further information is available. No known individual was identified. In 1916, a piece of fishhook made of human bone and a tool made of human bone were donated to the Bishop Museum by Mr. Albert F. Judd, Jr. No further documentation is available. No known individual was identified. In 1920, a kahili incorporating human bone was received by the Bishop Museum as a gift from Elizabeth Keka’ani’auokalani Pratt and Ewa K. Cartwright Styne. No further documentation is available. No known individual was identified. In 1923, three kahili incorporating human bone were received by the Bishop Museum as a gift from Elizabeth Kahanu Kalaniana‘ole Woods. No further documentation is available. No known individual was identified. In 1932, a kahili handle incorporating human bone was received by the Bishop Museum as a bequest from Lucy K. VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:52 May 23, 2007 Jkt 211001 Peabody. No known individual was identified. In 1944, a refuse container incorporating human teeth was donated to the Bishop Museum by Catherine Goodale. This container had been on loan to the Bishop Museum since 1928. No known individual was identified. After review, officials of the Bishop Museum determined that while these cultural items contain human remains, the cultural items themselves are not considered human remains pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1) and are not eligible for repatriation. In addition, the cultural items that are part of the founding collection or that have been given to Bishop Museum by members of the royal family are not eligible for repatriation as the ali’i had right of possession of these items and thus were given with clear title to the Bishop Museum. This notice does not recall the cultural items from the original notice that have since been repatriated and only applies to the 24 cultural items described above. Representatives of any Native Hawaiian organizations that wish to comment on this notice should address their comments to Betty Lou Kam, VicePresident, Cultural Resources, Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice Street, Honolulu, HI 96817, telephone (808) 848–4144, before June 25, 2007. The Bishop Museum is responsible for notifying the Friends of ’Iolani Palace, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna ’O Hawaii Nei, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and Princess Nahoa Olelo ’O Kamehameha Society that this notice has been published. Dated: March 20, 2007 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–10019 Filed 5–23–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the control the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington, PO 00000 Frm 00055 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Seattle, WA, that meet the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary objects’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Between the 1950s and 2002, a cultural item was removed from an unspecified location in the Columbia River area in Washington. The cultural item was collected by Ms. Rosemary Horwood through purchase and donated to the Burke Museum in 2004 (Burke Accn. #2004–72). No human remains are present. The one unassociated funerary object is a necklace of copper beads. Exact provenience is unknown; however, the cultural item is consistent with cultural items typically found in the context with burials in eastern Washington. In 1959–1960, 15 cultural items were removed from the north bank of the Snake River, approximately five to six miles down river from the mouth of the Palouse River in Franklin County, WA, by Dr. Harold Bergen and Mrs. Marjory Bergen. The Bergens designated this site #14 or the ‘‘Pipe Site.’’ The cultural items were donated to the Burke Museum in 1989 (Burke Accn. #1989– 57). The 15 unassociated funerary objects are 1 groundstone tool, 1 core, 1 stone pendant, 1 hammer stone, 1 modified stone, 1 stone paint pot, 1 pipe, 4 points, 3 scrapers, and 1 bag containing over 200 seeds. The burial pattern and unassociated funerary objects are consistent with Native American Plateau customs. The 1963 Indian Claims Commission decision indicates that this area is within the Palouse aboriginal territory. Early and late ethnographic documentation indicates that the present–day location of the Snake River in Franklin County, WA is within an overlapping aboriginal territory of the Cayuse, Palouse, Yakama, and Walla Walla (Daugherty 1973, Hale 1841, Mooney 1896, Ray 1936, Spier 1936, Sprague 1998, Stern 1998) whose descendants are members of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon; Nez Perce Tribe of Idaho; and Wanapum E:\FR\FM\24MYN1.SGM 24MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 100 (Thursday, May 24, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 29173-29174]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-10019]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, 
Honolulu, HI; Correction

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice; correction.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of a revision 
to an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Bernice 
Pauahi Bishop Museum (Bishop Museum), Honolulu, HI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    This notice corrects information reported in a Notice of Inventory 
Completion for the Bishop Museum published in the Federal Register on 
August 27, 1997 (FR Doc 97-22736, pages 45437-45438). Officials of the 
Bishop Museum have determined that 24 of the 34 cultural items 
published in the original notice do not meet the definition of human 
remains at 43 CFR 10.2 (d)(1) because while these items contain human 
remains, the items themselves are not considered human remains under 
NAGPRA definitions. The 24 cultural items that are being removed from 
the inventory are listed below.
    In 1889, Joseph S. Emerson sold a wood image from Waimea, O'ahu, to 
the Bishop Museum. Human hair is incorporated in this object. No known 
individual was identified.
    In 1889, a helmet (or wig) incorporating human hair and a refuse 
container incorporating human teeth and bone were bequeathed to the 
Bishop Museum by Queen Emma. No known individual was identified.
    In 1889, a kahili incorporating human bone became part of the 
original collections of the Bishop Museum. This kahili was given to 
Bernice Pauahi by Ke'elikolani. No known individual was identified.
    In 1891, a refuse container incorporating human teeth and a kahili 
incorporating human bone were acquired with the collections of the 
Hawaiian National Museum which were

[[Page 29174]]

transferred to the Bishop Museum. No further documentation is 
available. No known individual was identified.
    In 1892 or before, an image from Kaua'i with human hair was 
purchased by Bishop Museum Director William T. Brigham on behalf of the 
Bishop Museum. No known individual was identified.
    Prior to 1892, an image incorporating human hair was received as a 
gift by the Bishop Museum from the Trustees of O'ahu College. No known 
individual was identified.
    Prior to 1892, two bracelets incorporating human bone were received 
from an unknown source as part of the original Bishop Museum 
collections. No known individual was identified.
    In 1893, a sash with human teeth, a pahu (drum) incorporating human 
teeth, and a refuse container with human teeth were removed from 
'Iolani Palace by the Provisional Government and sent into the 
collections of the Bishop Museum. No known individual was identified.
    In 1895, an image incorporating human hair was purchased by the 
Bishop Museum from the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign 
Missions. No further documentation is available. No known individual 
was identified.
    In 1908, an ipu with human teeth from Kohala, HI, was purchased by 
the Bishop Museum from the estate of William E.H. Deverill. No further 
information is available. No known individual was identified.
    In 1910, a sash incorporating human teeth was received by the 
Bishop Museum as a gift from Queen Lili'uokalani. No further 
information is available. No known individual was identified.
    In 1916, a piece of fishhook made of human bone and a tool made of 
human bone were donated to the Bishop Museum by Mr. Albert F. Judd, Jr. 
No further documentation is available. No known individual was 
identified.
    In 1920, a kahili incorporating human bone was received by the 
Bishop Museum as a gift from Elizabeth Keka'ani'auokalani Pratt and Ewa 
K. Cartwright Styne. No further documentation is available. No known 
individual was identified.
    In 1923, three kahili incorporating human bone were received by the 
Bishop Museum as a gift from Elizabeth Kahanu Kalaniana`ole Woods. No 
further documentation is available. No known individual was identified.
    In 1932, a kahili handle incorporating human bone was received by 
the Bishop Museum as a bequest from Lucy K. Peabody. No known 
individual was identified.
    In 1944, a refuse container incorporating human teeth was donated 
to the Bishop Museum by Catherine Goodale. This container had been on 
loan to the Bishop Museum since 1928. No known individual was 
identified.
    After review, officials of the Bishop Museum determined that while 
these cultural items contain human remains, the cultural items 
themselves are not considered human remains pursuant to 43 CFR 10.2 
(d)(1) and are not eligible for repatriation. In addition, the cultural 
items that are part of the founding collection or that have been given 
to Bishop Museum by members of the royal family are not eligible for 
repatriation as the ali'i had right of possession of these items and 
thus were given with clear title to the Bishop Museum. This notice does 
not recall the cultural items from the original notice that have since 
been repatriated and only applies to the 24 cultural items described 
above.
    Representatives of any Native Hawaiian organizations that wish to 
comment on this notice should address their comments to Betty Lou Kam, 
Vice-President, Cultural Resources, Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice Street, 
Honolulu, HI 96817, telephone (808) 848-4144, before June 25, 2007.
    The Bishop Museum is responsible for notifying the Friends of 
'Iolani Palace, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna 'O Hawaii Nei, Office of 
Hawaiian Affairs, and Princess Nahoa Olelo 'O Kamehameha Society that 
this notice has been published.

    Dated: March 20, 2007
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E7-10019 Filed 5-23-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S