Special 301 Report: Identification of Countries That Deny Adequate Protection, or Market Access, for Intellectual Property Rights Under Section 182 of the Trade Act of 1974, 25342-25343 [E7-8496]

Download as PDF cprice-sewell on DSK89S0YB1PROD with NOTICES 25342 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 86 / Friday, May 4, 2007 / Notices (0.005 mCi). The physician did not prepare a written directive. The authorized user noted the error on July 25, 2006. The licensee estimated a whole body dose of 0.0189 Sv (1.89 rem) and a dose to the thyroid of 41.4 Sv (4,140 rem), based on a 59.2-percent uptake. Using the same assumptions, the intended dosage of 0.19 MBq (0.005 mCi) would have given the patient a thyroid dose of 0.104 Sv (10.4 rem). The patient and referring physician were notified of the medical event. The patient incurred no adverse health effects from the medical event. Cause(s)—This medical event was caused by inadequate verbal communications between the nuclear medicine technologist (NMT) and the physician and the lack of a written directive. Actions Taken to Prevent Recurrence. Licensee—The licensee reviewed previous administrations of radioiodine to confirm that this event was an isolated occurrence. The licensee added additional procedures to ensure proper oversight by a physician during all future radioidodine administrations. State Agency—The State investigated the event and concurred with the licensee’s dose estimates. The State issued a Notice of Violation to the licensee. * * * * * 06–06 Dose to an Embryo/Fetus at McLeod Regional Medical Center in Florence, South Carolina. Date and Place—May 26, 2006, Florence, South Carolina. Nature and Probable Consequences— The licensee reported an unintended dose to an embryo/fetus. The licensee administered 555 MBq (15 mCi) of technetium-99m on May 24, 2006, and 518 KBq (0.014 mCi) of I–131 on May 25 as a prelude to a thyroid ablation to a patient. Prior to the administrations and following a detailed explanation provided by the physician, the patient signed an informed consent indicating that she was not pregnant. The licensee’s radioactive materials license requires that a pregnancy test be done on any female of child-bearing age undergoing radiation therapy. However, the patient convinced the attending NMT that she could not possibly be pregnant. The NMT did not perform the pregnancy test and on May 26, 2006, administered 0.548 GBq (14.8 mCi) of I– 131 to the patient for a thyroid ablation. At approximately 32—34 weeks of pregnancy, the patient visited an obstetrician and mentioned that she had undergone a thyroid ablation procedure when she was approximately 17 weeks pregnant. The obstetrician notified the VerDate Nov<24>2008 14:51 Apr 20, 2010 Jkt 220001 licensee on October 3, 2006. The licensee estimated that the fetus received a whole body dose of 0.0517 Gy (5.17 rad) and a thyroid dose of 139.2 Gy (13,920 rad). The child was born in November 2006. The newborn appears to have no apparent problems resulting from the radiation exposure with the exception of an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyrodism). The child is currently receiving a small amount of thyroid supplement. The referring physician and patient were notified of the event. Cause(s)—This event was caused by human error. At the time of the administration, the patient indicated that she was not pregnant, and the licensee failed to perform the required pregnancy test. Actions Taken To Prevent Recurrence. Licensee—The licensee provided instructions to staff emphasizing its policy to administer a pregnancy test to female patients of child-bearing age prior to undergoing radiation therapy. State Agency—The State reviewed and approved the corrective actions taken by the licensee and will followup at the next inspection. The State is in the process of issuing a Notice of Violation. Dated at Rockville, Maryland this 20th day of April 2007. For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Andrew L. Bates, Acting Secretary of the Commission. [FR Doc. E7–8551 Filed 5–3–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7590–01–P OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Special 301 Report: Identification of Countries That Deny Adequate Protection, or Market Access, for Intellectual Property Rights Under Section 182 of the Trade Act of 1974 AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the United States Trade Representative (USTR) has submitted its 2007 ‘‘Special 301 Report,’’ an annual report on the identification of those foreign countries that deny adequate and effective protection of intellectual property rights or deny fair and equitable market access to United States persons that rely upon intellectual property protection, to the Committee on Finance of the United States Senate and the Committee on Ways and Means of the United States House of Representatives, pursuant to PO 00000 Frm 00101 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 section 182 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the Trade Act) (19 U.S.C. 2242). DATES: The 2007 Special 301 Report was released on April 30, 2007. The 2007 Special 301 Report is available on USTR’s Web site at http://www.ustr.gov. ADDRESSES: Office of the United States Trade Representative, 600 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20508. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jennifer Choe Groves, Director for Intellectual Property and Chair of the Special 301 Committee at (202) 395– 4510. Pursuant to Section 182 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended by the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 and the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (enacted in 1994), under Special 301 provisions, USTR must identify those countries that deny adequate and effective protection for intellectual property rights (IPR) or deny fair and equitable market access for persons that rely on intellectual property protection. Countries that have the most onerous or egregious acts, policies, or practices and whose acts, policies, or practices have the greatest adverse impact (actual or potential) on the relevant U.S. products must be designated as ‘‘Priority Foreign Countries.’’ Priority Foreign Countries are potentially subject to an investigation under the Section 301 provisions of the Trade Act of 1974. USTR may not designate a country as a Priority Foreign Country if it is entering into good faith negotiations or making significant progress in bilateral or multilateral negotiations to provide adequate and effective protection of IPR. USTR must decide whether to identify countries within 30 days after issuance of the annual National Trade Estimate Report. In addition, USTR may identify a trading partner as a Priority Foreign Country or remove such identification whenever warranted. USTR has created a ‘‘Priority Watch List’’ and ‘‘Watch List’’ under Special 301 provisions. Placement of a trading partner on the Priority Watch List or Watch List indicates that particular problems exist in that country with respect to IPR protection, enforcement, or market access for persons relying on intellectual property. Countries placed on the Priority Watch List are the focus of increased bilateral attention concerning the problem areas. Additionally, under Section 306, USTR monitors a country’s compliance with bilateral intellectual property agreements that are the basis for SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: E:\FR\FM\04MYN1.SGM 04MYN1 cprice-sewell on DSK89S0YB1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 86 / Friday, May 4, 2007 / Notices resolving an investigation under Section 301. USTR may apply sanctions if a country fails to satisfactorily implement an agreement. The interagency Trade Policy Staff Committee that advises USTR on the implementation of Special 301 obtains information from and holds consultations with affected industry groups and other private sector representatives, foreign governments, Congressional leaders, and interagency coordination within the United States Government, among other sources. The Special 301 Report is available on USTR’s Web site at http://www.ustr.gov. Following extensive research and analysis, the USTR has designated 43 countries in the categories of Priority Watch List, Watch List, and/or Section 306 Monitoring status. The Report affirms the Administration’s continuing commitment to address weak IPR protection and enforcement, particularly in Russia and China. With respect to Russia, the Special 301 Report describes the Bilateral Market Access Agreement between the United States and Russia, concluded in November 2006, which includes a letter setting out important commitments that will strengthen IPR protection and enforcement in Russia. The Report continues heightened scrutiny of Russia by maintaining Russia on the Priority Watch List and announcing plans for an Out-of-Cycle Review in 2007. With respect to China, the Special 301 Report describes the United States’ plan to maintain China on the Priority Watch List, to continue Section 306 Monitoring, and to pursue World Trade Organization dispute settlement with China on a number of IPR protection and enforcement issues. In addition, the Report contains a section entitled ‘‘Special Provincial Review of China,’’ in which the Administration reports on IPR protection and enforcement at China’s provincial level following an unprecedented review conducted over the past year. USTR again designates Paraguay for Section 306 monitoring to ensure its compliance with the commitments made to the United States under bilateral intellectual property agreements. In the Report, USTR also announces the placement of 12 trading partners on the Priority Watch List: China, Russia, Argentina, Chile, Egypt, India, Israel, Lebanon, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, and Venezuela. In addition, USTR places 30 trading partners on the Watch List: Belarus, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Hungary, Indonesia, Italy, VerDate Nov<24>2008 14:51 Apr 20, 2010 Jkt 220001 Jamaica, Kuwait, Lithuania, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Republic of Korea, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Vietnam. The Report announces that several countries are being removed from the Special 301 list completely: Bahamas, Bulgaria, Croatia, European Union, and Latvia. Finally, the Report notes that USTR will conduct Out-ofCycle Reviews of Brazil, the Czech Republic, Pakistan, and Russia. Victoria Espinel, Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Intellectual Property and Innovation. [FR Doc. E7–8496 Filed 5–3–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3190–W7–P PEACE CORPS New System of Records ACTION: Notice to add a new system of records. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a) the Peace Corps is giving notice of a new system of records, PC–22, titled Financial Management System. DATES: This action will be effective without further notice on June 18, 2007 unless comments are received by June 4, 2007 that would result in a contrary determination. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments by e-mail to sglasow@peacecorps.gov. You may also submit comments by mail to Suzanne Glasow, Office of the General Counsel, Peace Corps, Suite 8200, 1111 20th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20526. Contact Suzanne Glasow for copies of comments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Suzanne Glasow, Associate General Counsel, 202–692–2150, sglasow@peacecorps.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 552a provides that the public be given a 30-day period in which to comment on the new system. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB), which has oversight responsibility under the Act, requires a 40-day period in which to review the proposed system. In accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552a, Peace Corps has provided a report on this system to OMB and the Congress. System name: PC–22, Financial Management System (FMS). SYSTEM LOCATION: The financial system is located at the Peace Corps Headquarters. Authorized PO 00000 Frm 00102 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 25343 staff in Peace Corps offices, including those overseas, can access the automated system or its components. The Peace Corps office locations include Headquarters; Regional Recruitment offices; and Peace Corps overseas Posts. The number of Peace Corps recruiting offices is 11. The number of overseas offices (posts) fluctuates, from about 67 to about 71. CATEGORIES OF INDIVIDUALS COVERED BY THE SYSTEM: Individuals the Peace Corps owes money to or who receives a payment from the Peace Corps and those who owe money to the United States. These individuals consist of current and former Employees; Peace Corps Volunteers, Crisis Corps Volunteers; United Nations Volunteers; and returned Volunteers; Personal Services (PSC) and Other Contractors, Consultants, and Vendors who travel or perform certain services for PC; Donors; and Individuals whom Peace Corps Volunteers and Crisis Corps Volunteers have designated to receive their W–2 forms. CATEGORIES OF RECORDS IN THE SYSTEM: When applicable, information in the system includes, but is not limited to: Name, address, country of assignment, employee number, vendor number, social security number; Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN), including background and supporting documentation for most categories of individuals; banking data, PSC vendor Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number; contract numbers and contracts, invoice and payment records; travel payment records; Peace Corps, Crisis Corps, and United Nations Volunteer ID number, telephone numbers; date of birth, contacts, account numbers and payment records; claims, donors (Federal and non-federal), donor numbers and donation history. AUTHORITY FOR MAINTENANCE OF THE SYSTEM (INCLUDES ANY REVISIONS OR AMENDMENTS): Budget and Accounting Procedures Act of 1950; Federal Managers Financial Integrity Act; and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A–127, The Peace Corps Act, 22 U.S.C. 2501, et seq., Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996. PURPOSE: To support the financial functions required to track financial events, provide financial information significant to the financial management of Peace Corps and/or required for the preparation of financial statements and other federally-mandated reports and for the issuance of payments. E:\FR\FM\04MYN1.SGM 04MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 86 (Friday, May 4, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 25342-25343]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-8496]


=======================================================================
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE


Special 301 Report: Identification of Countries That Deny 
Adequate Protection, or Market Access, for Intellectual Property Rights 
Under Section 182 of the Trade Act of 1974

AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the United States Trade 
Representative (USTR) has submitted its 2007 ``Special 301 Report,'' an 
annual report on the identification of those foreign countries that 
deny adequate and effective protection of intellectual property rights 
or deny fair and equitable market access to United States persons that 
rely upon intellectual property protection, to the Committee on Finance 
of the United States Senate and the Committee on Ways and Means of the 
United States House of Representatives, pursuant to section 182 of the 
Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the Trade Act) (19 U.S.C. 2242).

DATES: The 2007 Special 301 Report was released on April 30, 2007. The 
2007 Special 301 Report is available on USTR's Web site at http://www.ustr.gov.

ADDRESSES: Office of the United States Trade Representative, 600 17th 
Street, NW., Washington, DC 20508.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jennifer Choe Groves, Director for 
Intellectual Property and Chair of the Special 301 Committee at (202) 
395-4510.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Pursuant to Section 182 of the Trade Act of 
1974, as amended by the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 
and the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (enacted in 1994), under Special 
301 provisions, USTR must identify those countries that deny adequate 
and effective protection for intellectual property rights (IPR) or deny 
fair and equitable market access for persons that rely on intellectual 
property protection. Countries that have the most onerous or egregious 
acts, policies, or practices and whose acts, policies, or practices 
have the greatest adverse impact (actual or potential) on the relevant 
U.S. products must be designated as ``Priority Foreign Countries.''
    Priority Foreign Countries are potentially subject to an 
investigation under the Section 301 provisions of the Trade Act of 
1974. USTR may not designate a country as a Priority Foreign Country if 
it is entering into good faith negotiations or making significant 
progress in bilateral or multilateral negotiations to provide adequate 
and effective protection of IPR.
    USTR must decide whether to identify countries within 30 days after 
issuance of the annual National Trade Estimate Report. In addition, 
USTR may identify a trading partner as a Priority Foreign Country or 
remove such identification whenever warranted.
    USTR has created a ``Priority Watch List'' and ``Watch List'' under 
Special 301 provisions. Placement of a trading partner on the Priority 
Watch List or Watch List indicates that particular problems exist in 
that country with respect to IPR protection, enforcement, or market 
access for persons relying on intellectual property. Countries placed 
on the Priority Watch List are the focus of increased bilateral 
attention concerning the problem areas.
    Additionally, under Section 306, USTR monitors a country's 
compliance with bilateral intellectual property agreements that are the 
basis for

[[Page 25343]]

resolving an investigation under Section 301. USTR may apply sanctions 
if a country fails to satisfactorily implement an agreement.
    The interagency Trade Policy Staff Committee that advises USTR on 
the implementation of Special 301 obtains information from and holds 
consultations with affected industry groups and other private sector 
representatives, foreign governments, Congressional leaders, and 
interagency coordination within the United States Government, among 
other sources.
    The Special 301 Report is available on USTR's Web site at http://www.ustr.gov.
    Following extensive research and analysis, the USTR has designated 
43 countries in the categories of Priority Watch List, Watch List, and/
or Section 306 Monitoring status. The Report affirms the 
Administration's continuing commitment to address weak IPR protection 
and enforcement, particularly in Russia and China.
    With respect to Russia, the Special 301 Report describes the 
Bilateral Market Access Agreement between the United States and Russia, 
concluded in November 2006, which includes a letter setting out 
important commitments that will strengthen IPR protection and 
enforcement in Russia. The Report continues heightened scrutiny of 
Russia by maintaining Russia on the Priority Watch List and announcing 
plans for an Out-of-Cycle Review in 2007.
    With respect to China, the Special 301 Report describes the United 
States' plan to maintain China on the Priority Watch List, to continue 
Section 306 Monitoring, and to pursue World Trade Organization dispute 
settlement with China on a number of IPR protection and enforcement 
issues. In addition, the Report contains a section entitled ``Special 
Provincial Review of China,'' in which the Administration reports on 
IPR protection and enforcement at China's provincial level following an 
unprecedented review conducted over the past year.
    USTR again designates Paraguay for Section 306 monitoring to ensure 
its compliance with the commitments made to the United States under 
bilateral intellectual property agreements.
    In the Report, USTR also announces the placement of 12 trading 
partners on the Priority Watch List: China, Russia, Argentina, Chile, 
Egypt, India, Israel, Lebanon, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, and 
Venezuela. In addition, USTR places 30 trading partners on the Watch 
List: Belarus, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, 
Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Hungary, Indonesia, Italy, 
Jamaica, Kuwait, Lithuania, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, 
Philippines, Poland, Republic of Korea, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, 
Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Vietnam. The Report announces 
that several countries are being removed from the Special 301 list 
completely: Bahamas, Bulgaria, Croatia, European Union, and Latvia. 
Finally, the Report notes that USTR will conduct Out-of-Cycle Reviews 
of Brazil, the Czech Republic, Pakistan, and Russia.

Victoria Espinel,
Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Intellectual Property and 
Innovation.
 [FR Doc. E7-8496 Filed 5-3-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3190-W7-P