Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CT7-5, -7, and -9 Series Turboprop Engines, 17379-17381 [E7-6446]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 67 / Monday, April 9, 2007 / Rules and Regulations Issued in Renton, Washington, on March 28, 2007. Ali Bahrami, Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. E7–6450 Filed 4–6–07; 8:45 am] TABLE 1.—REQUIRED MATERIAL INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE Airbus Service information Date All Operators Telex A300–54A6037. All Operators Telex A310–54A2038. Service Bulletin A300– 24–6097, including Appendix 01. Service Bulletin A310– 24–2100, including Appendix 01. February 19, 2004. February 19, 2004. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION March 3, 2006. Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2005–20944; Directorate Identifier 2003–NE–64–AD; Amendment 39– 15018; AD 2007–08–01] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CT7–5, –7, and –9 Series Turboprop Engines TABLE 2.—OPTIONAL MATERIAL INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE Airbus Service information Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: Date May 12, 2006. May 12, 2006. (1) The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of the service information identified in Table 3 of this AD in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. TABLE 3.—NEW MATERIAL INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE Airbus Service Bulletin rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with RULES A300–24–6097, including Appendix 01. A300–54–6038 ............. A310–24–2100, including Appendix 01. A310–54–2039 ............. Date March 3, 2006. May 12, 2006. March 3, 2006. May 12, 2006. (2) On May 13, 2004 (69 FR 23090, April 28, 2004), the Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of Airbus All Operators Telex A310–54A2038, dated February 19, 2004; and Airbus All Operators Telex A300–54A6037, dated February 19, 2004. (3) Contact Airbus, 1 Rond Point Maurice Bellonte, 31707 Blagnac Cedex, France, for a copy of this service information. You may review copies at the FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington; or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202–741–6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/ cfr/ibr-locations.html. VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:25 Apr 06, 2007 Jkt 211001 You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://dms.dot.gov or in Room PL–401 on the plaza level of the Nassif Building, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mark Bouyer, Engine Certification Office, FAA, Engine and Propeller Directorate, 12 New England Executive Park, Burlington, MA 01803; telephone (781) 238–7755; fax (781) 238–7199. The FAA proposed to amend 14 CFR part 39 with a proposed AD. The proposed AD applies to GE CT7–5A2, –5A3, –7A, –7A1, –9B, –9B1, and –9B2 turboprop engines, with certain P/N and serial number stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates installed. We published the proposed AD in the Federal Register on March 31, 2006 (71 FR 16248). That action proposed to expand the population of affected CT7 turboprop engine models required to undergo a onetime ECI of boltholes in certain P/N stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates. That action also proposed to reduce the number of cooling plates affected by identifying the serial numbers. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: March 3, 2006. You must use the service information identified in Table 2 of this AD to perform the optional terminating action, if accomplished, unless the AD specifies otherwise. Service Bulletin A300– 54–6038. Service Bulletin A310– 54–2039. BILLING CODE 4910–13–P 17379 SUMMARY: The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for General Electric Company (GE) CT7– 5A2, –5A3, –7A, –7A1, –9B, –9B1, and –9B2, –9C, –9C3, –9D, and –9D2 turboprop engines, with certain part number (P/N) and serial number stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates installed. That AD currently requires a onetime eddy current inspection (ECI) of boltholes in certain P/N stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates. This AD expands the population of affected CT7 turboprop engine models, but reduces the number of cooling plates affected. It also requires a onetime ECI of boltholes in certain P/ N stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates with specific serial numbers. This AD results from the manufacturer expanding the list of affected engine models and identifying the affected stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates by serial number. We are issuing this AD to prevent separation of the stage 2 turbine aft cooling plate, resulting in uncontained engine failure and damage to the airplane. This AD becomes effective May 14, 2007. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in the regulations as of May 14, 2007. ADDRESSES: You can get the service information identified in this AD from General Electric Aircraft Engines CT7 Series Turboprop Engines, 1000 Western Ave, Lynn, MA 01910; telephone (781) 594–3140, fax (781) 594–4805. DATES: PO 00000 Frm 00027 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Examining the AD Docket You may examine the docket that contains the AD, any comments received, and any final disposition in person at the Docket Management Facility between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The Docket Office (telephone (800) 647–5227) is located on the plaza level of the Department of Transportation Nassif Building at the street address stated in ADDRESSES. Comments will be available in the AD docket shortly after the DMS receives them. Comments We provided the public the opportunity to participate in the development of this AD. We have considered the comments received. Clarification of ECI Requirements GE suggests that we clarify paragraph (f) of this AD to limit the required ECI to stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates that are being returned to service. This change would eliminate any requirement to ECI cooling plates that are not going to be reused. We agree. If the cooling plate is not going to be reused, there is no need to ECI it immediately after it is removed. Paragraph (h) of this AD requires an ECI of all cooling plates affected by this AD before they are returned to service. We made the clarification to paragraph (f). E:\FR\FM\09APR1.SGM 09APR1 17380 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 67 / Monday, April 9, 2007 / Rules and Regulations Clarification of Onetime Inspection GE proposes that we add a terminating action statement to clarify that the ECI is a onetime inspection and repetitive inspections of the stage 2 turbine aft cooling plate is unnecessary. We do not agree. This information is already included in paragraph (f), which specifies that the inspection is a onetime ECI. We did not change the AD. Question on Compliance Threshold of 6,000 Cycles-in-Service (CIS) GE also questions whether the calculated compliance threshold of 6,000 CIS is viable given the amount of time required to publish the AD. We do not agree. The number of engine cycles that will accumulate during the AD review process will not change the safety assessment that is based on the calculated compliance time. We did not change the AD. Conclusion We have carefully reviewed the available data, including the comments received, and determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting the AD with the changes described previously. We have determined that these changes will neither increase the economic burden on any operator nor increase the scope of the AD. rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with RULES Costs of Compliance We estimate that this AD will affect 494 engines installed on airplanes of U.S. registry. We also estimate that it will take about 1 work-hour per engine to perform the actions, and that the average labor rate is $80 per work-hour. Based on the number of cracks found in the inspected engines, we estimate that 2.5 percent of the 494 engines will require replacing stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates because of rejection by the onetime ECI. Required parts will cost about $17,000 per engine. Based on these figures, we estimate the total cost of the AD to U.S. operators to be $243,520. Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, Section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701, ‘‘General requirements.’’ Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:25 Apr 06, 2007 Jkt 211001 for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this rulemaking action. Regulatory Findings We have determined that this AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; (2) Is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. We prepared a summary of the costs to comply with this AD and placed it in the AD Docket. You may get a copy of this summary at the address listed under ADDRESSES. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. Adoption of the Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the Federal Aviation Administration amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows: I PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: I Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 [Amended] 2. The FAA amends § 39.13 by removing Amendment 39–14247 70 FR 54835, September 19, 2005, and by adding a new airworthiness directive, Amendment 39–15018, to read as follows: I 2007–08–01 General Electric Company: Amendment 39–15018. Docket No. FAA–2005–20944; Directorate Identifier 2003–NE–64–AD. Effective Date (a) This airworthiness directive (AD) becomes effective May 14, 2007. PO 00000 Frm 00028 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Affected ADs (b) This AD supersedes AD 2005–18–01, Amendment 39–14247. Applicability (c) This AD applies to General Electric Company (GE) CT7–5A2/–5A3/–7A/–7A1/– 9B/–9B1/–9B2/–9C/–9C3/–9D/–9D2 turboprop engines with stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates, part number (P/N) 6064T07P01, 6064T07P02, 6064T07P05, or 6068T36P01 installed. These engines are installed on, but not limited to, Construcciones Aeronauticas, SA CN–235 series and SAAB Aircraft AB SF340 series airplanes. Unsafe Condition (d) This AD results from the manufacturer expanding the list of affected engine models and identifying the affected stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates by serial number. We are issuing this AD to prevent separation of the stage 2 turbine aft cooling plate, resulting in uncontained engine failure and damage to the airplane. Compliance (e) You are responsible for having the actions required by this AD performed at the next engine or hot section module shop visit, but before accumulating an additional 6,000 cycles-in-service after the effective date of the AD, unless already done. Onetime Eddy Current Inspection (ECI) (f) Perform a onetime ECI of the stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates P/N 6064T07P01, 6064T07P02, 6064T07P05, or 6068T36P01, that are listed by serial number in Section 4, Appendix A, of GE Alert Service Bulletin (ASB) No. CT7–TP S/B 72–A0464, Revision 04, dated December 12, 2005, and that will be returned to service. Use 3.B.(1) through 3.B.(3) of GE ASB No. CT7–TP S/B 72– A0464, Revision 4, dated December 12, 2005 to perform the inspection. (g) For stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates that do not pass the Return to Service Criteria, do either of the following: (1) Replace the stage 2 turbine aft cooling plate with a new cooling plate that has a serial number that is not listed in Section 4, Appendix A, of GE ASB No. CT7–TP S/B 72– A0464, Revision 04, dated December 12, 2005, or (2) Replace the stage 2 turbine aft cooling plate with a cooling plate that meets the acceptance criteria of 3.B.(1) through 3.B.(3) of GE ASB No. CT7–TP S/B 72–A0464, Revision 4, dated December 12, 2005. (h) After the effective date of this AD, do not install any stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates with serial numbers identified in Section 4, Appendix A, without inspecting the cooling plate as specified in 3.B.(1) through 3.B.(3) of GE ASB No. CT7–TP S/B 72–A0464 Revision 04, December 12, 2005. Previous Credit (i) Eddy current inspections of the stage 2 turbine aft cooling plate boltholes done before the effective date of this AD that use GE ASB No. CT7–TP S/B 72–A0464, dated February 25, 2003; or Revision 1, dated March 12, 2003; or Revision 2, dated May 9, E:\FR\FM\09APR1.SGM 09APR1 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 67 / Monday, April 9, 2007 / Rules and Regulations 2003; or Revision 3, dated July 23, 2004, comply with the requirements specified in this AD. ACTION: Definition of Engine or Hot Section Module Shop Visit (j) For the purposes of this AD, an engine or hot section module shop visit is defined as the introduction of the engine or hot section module into a shop that includes separating major case flanges. Alternative Methods of Compliance (k) The Manager, Engine Certification Office, has the authority to approve alternative methods of compliance for this AD if requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. Related Information (l) Contact Mark Bouyer, Engine Certification Office, FAA, Engine and Propeller Directorate, 12 New England Executive Park, Burlington, MA 01803; email: mark.bouyer@faa.gov; telephone (781) 238–7755; fax (781) 238–7199, for more information about this AD. Material Incorporated by Reference (m) You must use General Electric Alert Service Bulletin No. CT7–TP S/B 72–A0464, Revision 04, dated December 12, 2005, to perform the actions required by this AD. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of this service bulletin in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Contact General Electric Aircraft Engines CT7 Series Turboprop Engines, 1000 Western Ave, Lynn, MA 01910; telephone (781) 594–3140; fax (781) 594–4805 for a copy of this service information. You may review copies at the FAA, New England Region, Office of the Regional Counsel, 12 New England Executive Park, Burlington, MA; or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202–741–6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federalregister/cfr/ibr-locations.html. Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on April 2, 2007. Peter A. White, Acting Manager, Engine and Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. E7–6446 Filed 4–6–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary 14 CFR Part 331 [Docket OST–2006–25906] rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with RULES RIN 2105–AD61 Procedures for Reimbursement of General Aviation Operators and Service Providers in the Washington, DC Area AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, DOT. VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:25 Apr 06, 2007 Jkt 211001 Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule provides reimbursement to fixed-base general aviation operators and providers of general aviation ground support services at five metropolitan Washington, DC area airports, for the direct and incremental financial losses they incurred while the airports were closed due to Federal government actions taken after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. The airports are: Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport; College Park Airport in College Park, Maryland; Potomac Airfield in Fort Washington, Maryland; Washington Executive/Hyde Field in Clinton, Maryland; and Washington South Capitol Street Heliport in Washington, DC. DATES: This rule is effective May 9, 2007. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Interested persons with questions about this regulation should contact James R. Dann, U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of General Counsel, 400 7th Street, SW., Room 10102, Washington, DC 20590; telephone 202–366–9154. Interested persons with questions about how to apply for assistance, the status of application reviews, etc. should contact Tim Carmody, U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of Aviation Analysis, 400 7th Street, SW., Room 6417, Washington, DC 20590; telephone 202–366–2348. Application materials and data sources that may assist applicants in preparing applications are available at the Department of Transportation, Office of the Secretary’s Web site at http://ostpxweb.dot.gov/ aviation/index.html under ‘‘Programs,’’ and then ‘‘General Aviation Operator and Services Reimbursement: Procedures for Reimbursement of General Aviation Operators and Service Providers in the Washington, DC Area.’’ SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Following the terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001, general aviation activity in the Washington, DC metropolitan area was suspended. Five airports were most affected: Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA); College Park Airport in College Park, Maryland; Potomac Airfield in Fort Washington, Maryland; Washington Executive/Hyde Field in Clinton, Maryland; and Washington South Capitol Street Heliport in Washington, DC. While DCA and the three Maryland airports have since been reopened to transient general aviation traffic, the volume of general aviation activity has not returned to PO 00000 Frm 00029 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 17381 pre-September 11, 2001 levels due to continuing security restrictions, and the South Capitol Street Heliport was not reopened to general aviation traffic and is now used exclusively by the Washington DC Metropolitan Police. Because of the reduction in general aviation activity at these locations, the fixed-base operators and service providers that supported general aviation were also affected, with many claiming that they were incurring sustained and significant financial losses due to the closures. These fixed-base operators and service providers were not eligible for either compensation or loan guarantees under the Air Transportation Safety and System Stabilization Act, Pub. L. 107– 42 (Sept. 22, 2001), which had been enacted to provide compensation to ‘‘air carriers’’ who had incurred financial losses due to the terrorist attacks. Under that program, approximately $4.6 billion has been paid to qualifying air carriers. In 2003, the United States House of Representatives Committee on Appropriations requested that the Department of Transportation (DOT) prepare a report detailing the documented financial losses by holders of real property leases at the five affected airports that were attributable to the Federal actions since September 11, 2001. (House Report 108–243, July 30, 2003, p. 8.) The Committee stated that such a report would assist the Congress in considering ‘‘potential federal reimbursement for a portion of these unusual financial losses.’’ In October 2005, the Secretary of Transportation submitted to the Committee the requested report, which was entitled: Estimated Financial Losses to Selected General Aviation Entities in the Washington, DC Area Final Report (October 2005 DOT study). A copy of this Report has been placed onto the Office of the Secretary’s Web site, at the address noted above. (See FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). The October 2005 DOT study identified sixteen general aviation leaseholders at the five airports, and estimated the financial losses that each incurred during its study period (which ran from September 11, 2001 to January 23, 2004) due to the Federal actions taken after the terrorist attacks. The estimates reflected the difference in net income stated on a pre-tax basis between what the companies projected for the study period and the actual pretax net income for that period, and included both losses in pre-tax net income and one-time costs attributable directly to compliance with new restrictions or regulations resulting from the terrorist attacks. In formulating its E:\FR\FM\09APR1.SGM 09APR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 67 (Monday, April 9, 2007)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 17379-17381]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-6446]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2005-20944; Directorate Identifier 2003-NE-64-AD; 
Amendment 39-15018; AD 2007-08-01]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; General Electric Company CT7-5, -7, and 
-9 Series Turboprop Engines

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of 
Transportation (DOT).

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The FAA is superseding an existing airworthiness directive 
(AD) for General Electric Company (GE) CT7-5A2, -5A3, -7A, -7A1, -9B, -
9B1, and -9B2, -9C, -9C3, -9D, and -9D2 turboprop engines, with certain 
part number (P/N) and serial number stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates 
installed. That AD currently requires a onetime eddy current inspection 
(ECI) of boltholes in certain P/N stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates. 
This AD expands the population of affected CT7 turboprop engine models, 
but reduces the number of cooling plates affected. It also requires a 
onetime ECI of boltholes in certain P/N stage 2 turbine aft cooling 
plates with specific serial numbers. This AD results from the 
manufacturer expanding the list of affected engine models and 
identifying the affected stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates by serial 
number. We are issuing this AD to prevent separation of the stage 2 
turbine aft cooling plate, resulting in uncontained engine failure and 
damage to the airplane.

DATES: This AD becomes effective May 14, 2007. The Director of the 
Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of certain 
publications listed in the regulations as of May 14, 2007.

ADDRESSES: You can get the service information identified in this AD 
from General Electric Aircraft Engines CT7 Series Turboprop Engines, 
1000 Western Ave, Lynn, MA 01910; telephone (781) 594-3140, fax (781) 
594-4805.
    You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://dms.dot.gov 
or in Room PL-401 on the plaza level of the Nassif Building, 400 
Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mark Bouyer, Engine Certification 
Office, FAA, Engine and Propeller Directorate, 12 New England Executive 
Park, Burlington, MA 01803; telephone (781) 238-7755; fax (781) 238-
7199.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The FAA proposed to amend 14 CFR part 39 
with a proposed AD. The proposed AD applies to GE CT7-5A2, -5A3, -7A, -
7A1, -9B, -9B1, and -9B2 turboprop engines, with certain P/N and serial 
number stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates installed. We published the 
proposed AD in the Federal Register on March 31, 2006 (71 FR 16248). 
That action proposed to expand the population of affected CT7 turboprop 
engine models required to undergo a onetime ECI of boltholes in certain 
P/N stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates. That action also proposed to 
reduce the number of cooling plates affected by identifying the serial 
numbers.

Examining the AD Docket

    You may examine the docket that contains the AD, any comments 
received, and any final disposition in person at the Docket Management 
Facility between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except 
Federal holidays. The Docket Office (telephone (800) 647-5227) is 
located on the plaza level of the Department of Transportation Nassif 
Building at the street address stated in ADDRESSES. Comments will be 
available in the AD docket shortly after the DMS receives them.

Comments

    We provided the public the opportunity to participate in the 
development of this AD. We have considered the comments received.

Clarification of ECI Requirements

    GE suggests that we clarify paragraph (f) of this AD to limit the 
required ECI to stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates that are being 
returned to service. This change would eliminate any requirement to ECI 
cooling plates that are not going to be reused. We agree. If the 
cooling plate is not going to be reused, there is no need to ECI it 
immediately after it is removed. Paragraph (h) of this AD requires an 
ECI of all cooling plates affected by this AD before they are returned 
to service. We made the clarification to paragraph (f).

[[Page 17380]]

Clarification of Onetime Inspection

    GE proposes that we add a terminating action statement to clarify 
that the ECI is a onetime inspection and repetitive inspections of the 
stage 2 turbine aft cooling plate is unnecessary. We do not agree. This 
information is already included in paragraph (f), which specifies that 
the inspection is a onetime ECI. We did not change the AD.

Question on Compliance Threshold of 6,000 Cycles-in-Service (CIS)

    GE also questions whether the calculated compliance threshold of 
6,000 CIS is viable given the amount of time required to publish the 
AD. We do not agree. The number of engine cycles that will accumulate 
during the AD review process will not change the safety assessment that 
is based on the calculated compliance time. We did not change the AD.

Conclusion

    We have carefully reviewed the available data, including the 
comments received, and determined that air safety and the public 
interest require adopting the AD with the changes described previously. 
We have determined that these changes will neither increase the 
economic burden on any operator nor increase the scope of the AD.

Costs of Compliance

    We estimate that this AD will affect 494 engines installed on 
airplanes of U.S. registry. We also estimate that it will take about 1 
work-hour per engine to perform the actions, and that the average labor 
rate is $80 per work-hour. Based on the number of cracks found in the 
inspected engines, we estimate that 2.5 percent of the 494 engines will 
require replacing stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates because of 
rejection by the onetime ECI. Required parts will cost about $17,000 
per engine. Based on these figures, we estimate the total cost of the 
AD to U.S. operators to be $243,520.

Authority for This Rulemaking

    Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to 
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, Section 106, describes the 
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, 
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
    We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in 
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701, ``General 
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with 
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing 
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator 
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within 
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition 
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this 
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

    We have determined that this AD will not have federalism 
implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a 
substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between 
the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power 
and responsibilities among the various levels of government.
    For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD:
    (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive 
Order 12866;
    (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and 
Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and
    (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or 
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria 
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.
    We prepared a summary of the costs to comply with this AD and 
placed it in the AD Docket. You may get a copy of this summary at the 
address listed under ADDRESSES.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

    Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by 
reference, Safety.

Adoption of the Amendment

0
Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, 
the Federal Aviation Administration amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13  [Amended]

0
2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by removing Amendment 39-14247 70 FR 
54835, September 19, 2005, and by adding a new airworthiness directive, 
Amendment 39-15018, to read as follows:

2007-08-01 General Electric Company: Amendment 39-15018. Docket No. 
FAA-2005-20944; Directorate Identifier 2003-NE-64-AD.

Effective Date

    (a) This airworthiness directive (AD) becomes effective May 14, 
2007.

Affected ADs

    (b) This AD supersedes AD 2005-18-01, Amendment 39-14247.

Applicability

    (c) This AD applies to General Electric Company (GE) CT7-5A2/-
5A3/-7A/-7A1/-9B/-9B1/-9B2/-9C/-9C3/-9D/-9D2 turboprop engines with 
stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates, part number (P/N) 6064T07P01, 
6064T07P02, 6064T07P05, or 6068T36P01 installed. These engines are 
installed on, but not limited to, Construcciones Aeronauticas, SA 
CN-235 series and SAAB Aircraft AB SF340 series airplanes.

Unsafe Condition

    (d) This AD results from the manufacturer expanding the list of 
affected engine models and identifying the affected stage 2 turbine 
aft cooling plates by serial number. We are issuing this AD to 
prevent separation of the stage 2 turbine aft cooling plate, 
resulting in uncontained engine failure and damage to the airplane.

Compliance

    (e) You are responsible for having the actions required by this 
AD performed at the next engine or hot section module shop visit, 
but before accumulating an additional 6,000 cycles-in-service after 
the effective date of the AD, unless already done.

Onetime Eddy Current Inspection (ECI)

    (f) Perform a onetime ECI of the stage 2 turbine aft cooling 
plates P/N 6064T07P01, 6064T07P02, 6064T07P05, or 6068T36P01, that 
are listed by serial number in Section 4, Appendix A, of GE Alert 
Service Bulletin (ASB) No. CT7-TP S/B 72-A0464, Revision 04, dated 
December 12, 2005, and that will be returned to service. Use 3.B.(1) 
through 3.B.(3) of GE ASB No. CT7-TP S/B 72-A0464, Revision 4, dated 
December 12, 2005 to perform the inspection.
    (g) For stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates that do not pass the 
Return to Service Criteria, do either of the following:
    (1) Replace the stage 2 turbine aft cooling plate with a new 
cooling plate that has a serial number that is not listed in Section 
4, Appendix A, of GE ASB No. CT7-TP S/B 72-A0464, Revision 04, dated 
December 12, 2005, or
    (2) Replace the stage 2 turbine aft cooling plate with a cooling 
plate that meets the acceptance criteria of 3.B.(1) through 3.B.(3) 
of GE ASB No. CT7-TP S/B 72-A0464, Revision 4, dated December 12, 
2005.
    (h) After the effective date of this AD, do not install any 
stage 2 turbine aft cooling plates with serial numbers identified in 
Section 4, Appendix A, without inspecting the cooling plate as 
specified in 3.B.(1) through 3.B.(3) of GE ASB No. CT7-TP S/B 72-
A0464 Revision 04, December 12, 2005.

Previous Credit

    (i) Eddy current inspections of the stage 2 turbine aft cooling 
plate boltholes done before the effective date of this AD that use 
GE ASB No. CT7-TP S/B 72-A0464, dated February 25, 2003; or Revision 
1, dated March 12, 2003; or Revision 2, dated May 9,

[[Page 17381]]

2003; or Revision 3, dated July 23, 2004, comply with the 
requirements specified in this AD.

Definition of Engine or Hot Section Module Shop Visit

    (j) For the purposes of this AD, an engine or hot section module 
shop visit is defined as the introduction of the engine or hot 
section module into a shop that includes separating major case 
flanges.

Alternative Methods of Compliance

    (k) The Manager, Engine Certification Office, has the authority 
to approve alternative methods of compliance for this AD if 
requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19.

Related Information

    (l) Contact Mark Bouyer, Engine Certification Office, FAA, 
Engine and Propeller Directorate, 12 New England Executive Park, 
Burlington, MA 01803; e-mail: mark.bouyer@faa.gov; telephone (781) 
238-7755; fax (781) 238-7199, for more information about this AD.

Material Incorporated by Reference

    (m) You must use General Electric Alert Service Bulletin No. 
CT7-TP S/B 72-A0464, Revision 04, dated December 12, 2005, to 
perform the actions required by this AD. The Director of the Federal 
Register approved the incorporation by reference of this service 
bulletin in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. 
Contact General Electric Aircraft Engines CT7 Series Turboprop 
Engines, 1000 Western Ave, Lynn, MA 01910; telephone (781) 594-3140; 
fax (781) 594-4805 for a copy of this service information. You may 
review copies at the FAA, New England Region, Office of the Regional 
Counsel, 12 New England Executive Park, Burlington, MA; or at the 
National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information 
on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or 
go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibr-
locations.html.

    Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on April 2, 2007.
Peter A. White,
Acting Manager, Engine and Propeller Directorate, Aircraft 
Certification Service.
 [FR Doc. E7-6446 Filed 4-6-07; 8:45 am]
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