Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology, Museum of New Mexico, New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, Santa Fe, NM; Correction, 15722-15723 [E7-5975]

Download as PDF 15722 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 62 / Monday, April 2, 2007 / Notices Tennessee Shelby County Southern Railway Industrial Historic District, Roughly bounded by Beale, Myrtle, and the Souther Railway tracks, Linden, Jessamine and Orleans, Memphis, 07000361 Virginia Fairfax County Merrybrook, 2346 Centreville Rd., Herndon, 07000362 Richmond Independent City Richmond Locomotive and Machine Works, 1331 North Blvd., Richmond (Independent City), 07000363 Virginia Beach Independent City Woodhouse House, 3067 W. Neck Rd., Virginia Beach (Independent City), 07000372 Washington Franklin County Sacajawea State Park, 2503 Sacajawea Park Rd., Pasco, 07000364 Whitman County Central Service Station, 534 Whitman St., Rosalia, 07000365 Yakima County Gothen Creek Ranger Station, Forest Service Rd., Gifford Pinchot National Forest, 07000369 Wisconsin Brown County Randall Avenue Historic District, Generally bounded by Ridgeway Blvd. and Oakdale Ave. and Glenwood Ave., De Pere, 07000370 Wyoming Fremont County T Cross Ranch Rural Historic District, Address Restricted, Dubois, 07000371 Sublette County Trappers Point Site, Address Restricted, Pinedale, 07000368 [FR Doc. E7–5954 Filed 3–30–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–51–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service hsrobinson on PROD1PC76 with NOTICES Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology, Museum of New Mexico, New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, Santa Fe, NM; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:39 Mar 30, 2007 Jkt 211001 completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology, Museum of New Mexico, New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, Santa Fe, NM. The human remains were removed from Torrance County, NM. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology and Department of Cultural Affairs professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. This notice is an addition of a minimum of 33 individuals from sites LA 95 (Quarai site) and LA 97 (Abo site), which were previously described in a Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register on August 29, 2000 (FR Doc 00–21974, pages 52441–52442). The human remains are extremely fragmentary and were found mixed in containers of non– human bone in the museum’s collection. In 2000, the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology repatriated the human remains of the 29 individuals described in the Notice of Inventory Completion of August 29, 2000, to the Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo of Texas. At that same time, unassociated funerary objects from the LA 95 (Quarai site) described in a Notice of Intent to Repatriate published in the Federal Register on August 29, 2000 (FR Doc 00–21973, pages 52440– 52441), were also repatriated. In 2004, the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology and Department of Cultural Affairs found human remains representing a minimum of five individuals from site LA 97 (Abo site), Torrance County, NM, in their collection. The human remains had been removed in 1944–1945, and 1958, PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 during legally authorized excavations conducted by the Museum of New Mexico. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Based on archeological context, the human remains have been identified as Native American. Based on material culture and architectural features, site LA 97 (Abo site) is dated to the Pueblo IV through the early historic period (1300 A.D.–1680 A.D.). In 2006, the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology and Department of Cultural Affairs found human remains representing a minimum 28 individuals from site LA 95 (Quarai site), Torrance County, NM, in their collection. The human remains had been removed in 1935–1936 and 1939–1940, during legally authorized excavations conducted as part of a multi-year stabilization project sponsored variously by the Museum of New Mexico, School of American Research, and Works Progress Administration. An additional undetermined number of individuals were recovered during the same time, some of which are curated by the Smithsonian Institution, and some of which are missing. The human remains found in the collections have not been identified as part of those individuals that were previously reported missing. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Based on archeological context, the human remains have been identified as Native American. Based on material culture, architectural features, and documentary evidence, site LA 95 (Quarai site) is dated to the Pueblo III to Pueblo IV and through Spanish Contact/ Colonial (1100 A.D.–1680 A.D.). The determination of material dates is based on archeological context and the cultural chronology for this region. Both sites are classified as Ancestral Puebloan and the human remains from these sites were recovered from cultural deposits containing ceramics that are materially and stylistically consistent with objects known to Southwestern archeologists as Ancestral Puebloan. Historical evidence also records these sites as trade centers, which enjoyed frequent contact with non–Puebloan tribes. Descendants of Ancestral Puebloan are members of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico; as well as the E:\FR\FM\02APN1.SGM 02APN1 hsrobinson on PROD1PC76 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 62 / Monday, April 2, 2007 / Notices Piro–Manso–Tiwa Indian group, a non– federally recognized Indian group. Officials of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology, Department of Cultural Affairs have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 33 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology, Department of Cultural Affairs also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico; as well as the Piro–Manso–Tiwa Indian group, a non– federally recognized Indian group. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Shelby J. Tisdale, Director, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology, P.O. Box 2087, Santa Fe, NM 87504, telephone (505) 476–1251, before May 2, 2007. Repatriation of the human remains to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Officials of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology are responsible for notifying the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico; and Piro–Manso–Tiwa Indian group, a non–federally recognized Indian group. VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:39 Mar 30, 2007 Jkt 211001 Dated: March 9, 2007 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–5975 Filed 3–30–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Southwest Museum of the American Indian, Autry National Center, Los Angeles, CA; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Southwest Museum of the American Indian, Autry National Center, Los Angeles, CA, that meet the definitions of ‘‘sacred objects’’ and ‘‘objects of cultural patrimony’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. This notice corrects a previously published Notice of Intent to Repatriate by increasing the number of cultural items listed from 55 to 56 cultural items, as the original notice omitted one Dilzini Gaan headdress. In the Federal Register of November 2, 2006, (FR Doc E6–18509, pages 64559–64561), the following corrections are made – The third paragraph is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: The 56 cultural items are 42 pieces of Dilzini Gaandance material, 7 Dilzini Gaan headdresses, 2 Dilzini Gaan dance wands, 2 crosses, 1 shirt, 1 medicine bundle, and 1 cap. Paragraphs 9 and 10 are corrected by substituting the following paragraphs: On December 3, 1935, the Southwest Museum purchased four Dilzini Gaan headdresses from Ms. Bonnie Gray of Burbank, CA, with money provided by the General Charles McCormack Reeve Fund. According to correspondence found in the museum records, Ms. Gray and a companion unearthed the masks in Arizona from the floor of a deserted Apache cabin during the middle of the PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 15723 night. Museum records identify all four headdresses as Apache ‘‘Devil Dance’’ material. The first of the four Dilzini Gaan headdresses is made of wooden slats tied together with sinew arranged in a fan shape measuring approximately 31 inches wide and 35 inches high. The slats are decorated with small mirrors and red, black, blue and yellow painted zigzags, arrows, birds, and geometric designs. A black cloth mask is attached to the frame with two slits made for the wearer’s eyes. The second Dilzini Gaan headdress is made of wooden slats tied together with sinew arranged in a fan shape measuring approximately 30.5 inches wide and 36 inches high. Blue, red–orange, black, purple, green, and yellow triangles, diamonds, circles, and other geometric shapes have been painted on both sides of the wooden slats. The third Dilzini Gaan headdress is made of long wooden slats divided into three groups and connected by smaller wooden slats to create a fan shaped arc tied together with sinew. It measures approximately 26 inches wide and 40 inches high. Red, yellow, blue, purple, and green diamonds, scallops, triangles, and dots have been painted on both sides of the slats. Mirrors adhere to the longer slats and one mirror appears to be missing. Two tassels made of four slender yellow wooden rods are attached to the laterally projecting slats. There is no mask for the headdress. The fourth Dilzini Gaan headdress is made of wooden slats tied together with sinew arranged into three points. The headdress measures approximately 17 inches wide and 18 inches high, is decorated with black, red, and purple chevrons and black dots on one side, and is decorated with black, green, red, and purple dots on the opposite side. Paragraphs 20 to 23 are also corrected by substituting the following: Consultation and physical inspection of the cultural items described above by knowledgeable Western Apache traditional cultural authorities of the San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; Tonto Apache Tribe of Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; and Yavapai–Apache Nation of the Camp Verde Indian Reservation, Arizona have identified the cultural items as culturally affiliated with Western Apache Indian tribes. According to the traditional cultural authorities, the cultural items have ongoing historical, traditional, and cultural importance to the Western Apache, and today, must be returned to the tribes representing the Western Apache to fully complete the ceremonial cycle into which they were E:\FR\FM\02APN1.SGM 02APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 62 (Monday, April 2, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 15722-15723]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-5975]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Indian Arts and 
Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology, Museum of New Mexico, New Mexico 
Department of Cultural Affairs, Santa Fe, NM; Correction

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice; correction.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology, Museum 
of New Mexico, New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, Santa Fe, NM. 
The human remains were removed from Torrance County, NM.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Museum 
of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology and Department 
of Cultural Affairs professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Kiowa Indian Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, 
Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; 
and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico.
    This notice is an addition of a minimum of 33 individuals from 
sites LA 95 (Quarai site) and LA 97 (Abo site), which were previously 
described in a Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal 
Register on August 29, 2000 (FR Doc 00-21974, pages 52441-52442). The 
human remains are extremely fragmentary and were found mixed in 
containers of non-human bone in the museum's collection. In 2000, the 
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of Anthropology 
repatriated the human remains of the 29 individuals described in the 
Notice of Inventory Completion of August 29, 2000, to the Ysleta Del 
Sur Pueblo of Texas. At that same time, unassociated funerary objects 
from the LA 95 (Quarai site) described in a Notice of Intent to 
Repatriate published in the Federal Register on August 29, 2000 (FR Doc 
00-21973, pages 52440-52441), were also repatriated.
    In 2004, the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of 
Anthropology and Department of Cultural Affairs found human remains 
representing a minimum of five individuals from site LA 97 (Abo site), 
Torrance County, NM, in their collection. The human remains had been 
removed in 1944-1945, and 1958, during legally authorized excavations 
conducted by the Museum of New Mexico. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Based on archeological context, the human remains have been 
identified as Native American. Based on material culture and 
architectural features, site LA 97 (Abo site) is dated to the Pueblo IV 
through the early historic period (1300 A.D.-1680 A.D.).
    In 2006, the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of 
Anthropology and Department of Cultural Affairs found human remains 
representing a minimum 28 individuals from site LA 95 (Quarai site), 
Torrance County, NM, in their collection. The human remains had been 
removed in 1935-1936 and 1939-1940, during legally authorized 
excavations conducted as part of a multi-year stabilization project 
sponsored variously by the Museum of New Mexico, School of American 
Research, and Works Progress Administration. An additional undetermined 
number of individuals were recovered during the same time, some of 
which are curated by the Smithsonian Institution, and some of which are 
missing. The human remains found in the collections have not been 
identified as part of those individuals that were previously reported 
missing. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    Based on archeological context, the human remains have been 
identified as Native American. Based on material culture, architectural 
features, and documentary evidence, site LA 95 (Quarai site) is dated 
to the Pueblo III to Pueblo IV and through Spanish Contact/Colonial 
(1100 A.D.-1680 A.D.).
    The determination of material dates is based on archeological 
context and the cultural chronology for this region. Both sites are 
classified as Ancestral Puebloan and the human remains from these sites 
were recovered from cultural deposits containing ceramics that are 
materially and stylistically consistent with objects known to 
Southwestern archeologists as Ancestral Puebloan. Historical evidence 
also records these sites as trade centers, which enjoyed frequent 
contact with non-Puebloan tribes. Descendants of Ancestral Puebloan are 
members of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Taos, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the 
Zuni Reservation, New Mexico; as well as the

[[Page 15723]]

Piro-Manso-Tiwa Indian group, a non-federally recognized Indian group.
    Officials of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of 
Anthropology, Department of Cultural Affairs have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described above 
represent the physical remains of 33 individuals of Native American 
ancestry. Officials of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, 
Laboratory of Anthropology, Department of Cultural Affairs also have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the Native American human remains and the Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur 
Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico; as 
well as the Piro-Manso-Tiwa Indian group, a non-federally recognized 
Indian group.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. 
Shelby J. Tisdale, Director, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, 
Laboratory of Anthropology, P.O. Box 2087, Santa Fe, NM 87504, 
telephone (505) 476-1251, before May 2, 2007. Repatriation of the human 
remains to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Taos, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the 
Zuni Reservation, New Mexico may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    Officials of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Laboratory of 
Anthropology are responsible for notifying the Caddo Nation of 
Oklahoma; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; 
Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; Pueblo 
of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the 
Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; Wichita and Affiliated Tribes 
(Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of 
Texas; Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico; and Piro-Manso-
Tiwa Indian group, a non-federally recognized Indian group.

    Dated: March 9, 2007
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E7-5975 Filed 3-30-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S