Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO, 15724-15725 [E7-5972]

Download as PDF hsrobinson on PROD1PC76 with NOTICES 15724 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 62 / Monday, April 2, 2007 / Notices introduced; as such, the cultural items are objects of cultural patrimony. According to Western Apache traditional cultural authorities, the 56 cultural items are made and handled according to instructions received from the Creator. The Creator is the only One who has the right to possess the cultural items after their use by humans. The cultural items must be put away properly to return them to the Creator; as such, the cultural items are sacred objects. The Western Apache are represented today by the federally recognized San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; Tonto Apache Tribe of Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; and Yavapai–Apache Nation of the Camp Verde Indian Reservation, Arizona. These four tribes are members of the Western Apache NAGPRA Working Group. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the objects of cultural patrimony/sacred objects should contact Dr. Duane H. King, Executive Director, or LaLena Lewark, Senior NAGPRA Coordinator, Southwest Museum of the American Indian, Autry National Center, 234 Museum Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90065, telephone (323) 221–2164 extension 241, before May 2, 2007. Repatriation of the objects of cultural patrimony/sacred objects to the San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; Tonto Apache Tribe of Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; and Yavapai– Apache Nation of the Camp Verde Indian Reservation, Arizona may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Southwest Museum is responsible for notifying the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; Tonto Apache Tribe of Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; and Yavapai–Apache Nation of the Camp Verde Indian Reservation, Arizona that this notice has been published. Dated: March 14, 2007 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–5977 Filed 3–30–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:39 Mar 30, 2007 Jkt 211001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed from Chelan County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Burke Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington and Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington. Sometime before 1948, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Stehekin in Chelan County, WA, by Harold Wheeler. In 1948, the human remains were loaned to the Burke Museum by Mr. Wheeler (Burke Accn. #3512). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains were previously determined to not be Native American. After further review based on osteological information, the preponderance of the evidence identifies the human remains as Native American. According to early and late ethnographic documentation, the Stehekin area was occupied by the Chelan tribe and is their aboriginal land (Miller 1998; Ray 1936; Ruby and Brown 1986; and Spier 1936). Information provided during consultation by representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington confirms that the Chelan tribe traditionally occupied the Stehekin area. Descendants of the Chelan Tribe are members of the PO 00000 Frm 00081 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington. Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Burke Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195–3010, telephone (206) 685–2282, before May 2, 2007. Repatriation of the human remains to the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington and Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington that this notice has been published. Dated: March 12, 2007 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–5978 Filed 3–30–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO. The human remains were removed from southeastern Colorado. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National E:\FR\FM\02APN1.SGM 02APN1 hsrobinson on PROD1PC76 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 62 / Monday, April 2, 2007 / Notices Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University of Colorado Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Cheyenne–Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma and Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Mud Creek, a branch of the Purgatoire River in southeastern Colorado in or near Bent County, CO, by a soldier named Lance. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Information recorded on the human remains indicates that in 1866 or 1869, a party of Cheyenne Indians was hunting in a small canyon on Mud Creek and they were ambushed by a party of Ute Indians. Several of the Cheyenne Indians were killed. The bodies were buried near the creek, and some years later, flood waters cut back the bank and exposed some of the skeletons. Lance, a soldier stationed nearby, collected a cranium. The cranium was given to his friend, David J. Burnett. On June 17, 1962, Mr. Burnett’s daughter, Mrs. Ethel Burnett Zeigler, donated the cranium to the University of Colorado Museum (Catalog number 99410). Based on the morphology of the teeth and cranium, the human remains represent a Native American adult male. Based on museum records, the human remains are Cheyenne. Descendants of the Cheyenne are members of the Cheyenne–Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma and Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana. Officials of the University of Colorado Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the University of Colorado Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Cheyenne–Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma and Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Steve Lekson, Curator of Anthropology, University of Colorado Museum, Henderson Building, Campus Box 218, Boulder, CO 80309–0218, VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:39 Mar 30, 2007 Jkt 211001 telephone (303) 492–6671, before May 2, 2007. Repatriation of the human remains to the Cheyenne–Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma and Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The University of Colorado Museum is responsible for notifying the Cheyenne–Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma and Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana that this notice has been published. Dated: March 6, 2007 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–5972 Filed 3–30–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS that meets the definitions of ‘‘sacred object’’ and ‘‘object of cultural patrimony’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. The cultural item is a woven basket. The University of Kansas acquired the basket from an unknown donor in 1917. Representatives of the Yurok Tribe of the Yurok Reservation, California identified the cultural item as a ceremonial basket used in the Wo-neekwo-ley-go (Jump Dance). Tribal representatives also indicated that Yurok law prohibits the sale of such ceremonial items. Officials of the University of Kansas have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(C), the cultural item described above is a specific ceremonial object needed by traditional Native PO 00000 Frm 00082 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 15725 American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by their present-day adherents. Officials of the University of Kansas also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(D), the cultural item described above has ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. Lastly, officials of the University of Kansas have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred object/object of cultural patrimony and the Yurok Tribe of the Yurok Reservation, California. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the sacred object/object of cultural patrimony should contact Thomas Foor, NAGPRA Coordinator, ARCC, University of Kansas, Spooner Hall, 1340 Jayhawk Blvd., Room 5B, Lawrence, KS 66045–7500, telephone (785) 766–5476, before May 2, 2007. Repatriation of the sacred object/object of cultural patrimony to the Yurok Tribe of the Yurok Reservation, California may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The University of Kansas is responsible for notifying the Yurok Tribe of the Yurok Reservation, California that this notice has been published. Dated: January 24, 2007 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–5974 Filed 3–30–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA. The human remains were removed from San Joaquin County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility E:\FR\FM\02APN1.SGM 02APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 62 (Monday, April 2, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 15724-15725]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-5972]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, 
Boulder, CO

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO. The human remains were 
removed from southeastern Colorado.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National

[[Page 15725]]

Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University 
of Colorado Museum professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma and Northern 
Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from Mud Creek, a branch of the Purgatoire 
River in southeastern Colorado in or near Bent County, CO, by a soldier 
named Lance. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    Information recorded on the human remains indicates that in 1866 or 
1869, a party of Cheyenne Indians was hunting in a small canyon on Mud 
Creek and they were ambushed by a party of Ute Indians. Several of the 
Cheyenne Indians were killed. The bodies were buried near the creek, 
and some years later, flood waters cut back the bank and exposed some 
of the skeletons. Lance, a soldier stationed nearby, collected a 
cranium. The cranium was given to his friend, David J. Burnett. On June 
17, 1962, Mr. Burnett's daughter, Mrs. Ethel Burnett Zeigler, donated 
the cranium to the University of Colorado Museum (Catalog number 
99410).
    Based on the morphology of the teeth and cranium, the human remains 
represent a Native American adult male. Based on museum records, the 
human remains are Cheyenne. Descendants of the Cheyenne are members of 
the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma and Northern Cheyenne Tribe of 
the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana.
    Officials of the University of Colorado Museum have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the University of Colorado Museum also 
have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the Native American human remains and the Cheyenne-Arapaho 
Tribes of Oklahoma and Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the Northern Cheyenne 
Indian Reservation, Montana.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Steve 
Lekson, Curator of Anthropology, University of Colorado Museum, 
Henderson Building, Campus Box 218, Boulder, CO 80309-0218, telephone 
(303) 492-6671, before May 2, 2007. Repatriation of the human remains 
to the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma and Northern Cheyenne Tribe 
of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana may proceed after 
that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The University of Colorado Museum is responsible for notifying the 
Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma and Northern Cheyenne Tribe of the 
Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: March 6, 2007
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E7-5972 Filed 3-30-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S