Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO, 12192-12193 [E7-4733]

Download as PDF 12192 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 50 / Thursday, March 15, 2007 / Notices Dated: January 26, 2007. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–4732 Filed 3–14–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: rmajette on PROD1PC67 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO, that meet the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary objects’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Between 1954 and 1990, cultural items were legally excavated on private land near Yellow Jacket Pueblo (5MT5), Montezuma County, CO, by Dr. Joe Ben Wheat, during University of Colorado Museum sponsored archeological field schools. The excavated cultural items were collected from graves and legally transferred to the museum each season. The human remains were not collected due to deterioration or other circumstances. The 68 cultural items are 66 ceramic items (whole vessels, broken vessels, and sherd lots), 1 stone ax, and 1 bone awl. The three habitation sites, identified on the National Register of Historic Places as the Joe Ben Wheat Site Complex, are at the head of Yellow Jacket Canyon to the west of Tatum Draw and southwest of the very large archeological site, Yellow Jacket Pueblo. The Yellow Jacket burials were predominantly single interments, appearing in a wide variety of locations, including abandoned rooms and kivas, storage pits, subfloor burial pits, extramural burial pits, and middens. The habitation sites were occupied at various times during the Basketmaker III, Pueblo II, and Pueblo III periods, approximately A.D. 550 - 1250, with a VerDate Aug<31>2005 14:20 Mar 14, 2007 Jkt 211001 temporary abandonment during the Pueblo I period, approximately A.D. 750 - 900. Based on the general continuity in the material culture and the architecture of these sites, it appears that the community that lived in this area had long-standing ties to the region and returned to sites even after migrations away from the locale that lasted more than one hundred years. However, by the late 13th century, both the Yellow Jacket sites and the nearby Mesa Verde region showed no evidence of human habitation. The sites are not used again until the 1920s when the locale was homesteaded and farmed. The archeological evidence supports identification with Basketmaker and later Pueblo (Hisatsinom, Ancestral Puebloan, or Anasazi) cultures, which prehistorically occupied southwestern Colorado. Both Basketmaker and Pueblo occupations are represented in the archeology at the Yellow Jacket site. Archeologists have noted in the scientific literature the striking similarity between the technology and style of material culture of 13th century archeological sites in southwestern Colorado and the material culture remains of 14th century Puebloan sites in Arizona and New Mexico. Oral-tradition evidence, which consists of migration stories, clan histories, and origin stories, was provided by representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Ysleta del Sur, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Folkloric evidence in the form of songs was provided by tribal representatives of the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; and Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico. Tribal representatives of the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; and Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico provided linguistic evidence rooted in place names. Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; and Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico provided archeological evidence based on architecture and PO 00000 Frm 00029 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 material culture of their shared relationship. Archeological, historical and linguistic evidence presently points to Navajo migration to the Yellow Jacket and Monument Ruin area after A.D. 1300. During consultation, the Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah emphasized their long presence in the Four Corners and their origin in this area, but there is not a preponderance of the evidence to support Navajo cultural affiliation. Based on a preponderance of evidence, including oral tradition, folklore, linguistic, geographic, archeology, historical, and scientific studies, cultural affiliation can be traced between the 68 unassociated funerary objects and modern Puebloan peoples. Modern Puebloan peoples are members of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Officials of the University of Colorado Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the 68 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of an Native American individual. Officials of the University of Colorado Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, E:\FR\FM\15MRN1.SGM 15MRN1 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 50 / Thursday, March 15, 2007 / Notices New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Stephen Lekson, Curator of Anthropology, University of Colorado Museum, Henderson Building, Campus Box 218, Boulder, CO 80309– 0218, telephone (303) 492–6671, before April 16, 2007. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. University of Colorado Museum is responsible for notifying the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah; Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published. Dated: February 2, 2007. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–4733 Filed 3–14–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service rmajette on PROD1PC67 with NOTICES Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act VerDate Aug<31>2005 14:20 Mar 14, 2007 Jkt 211001 (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS that meet the definitions of ‘‘sacred objects and ‘‘objects of cultural patrimony’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. The four cultural items are four Hopi ‘‘spirit friends’’ or Katsina masks (Matia, Hopak, Woe, and Mudhead). In 1966, Mrs. Agnese N. Haury purchased masks of the Hopi deities Matia, Hopak, and Woe at O’Reilly’s Plaza Art Galleries, Inc., in New York. Mrs. Haury donated the three Katsina masks to the University of Kansas in 1990. In 1992, the Karl Menninger Foundation donated a mask of the Hopi deity Mudhead to the University of Kansas. It is not known when or how Dr. Menninger acquired the Mudhead mask. Representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona, acting on behalf of the Katsinmomngwit (Hopi traditional religious leaders), have identified the four cultural items as being needed by traditional Hopi religious leaders for the practice of a traditional Native American religion by their present-day adherents. Representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona also have identified the four cultural items as having ongoing historical, traditional, and cultural importance central to the culture itself, and the cultural items could not be alienated by any individual. Officials of the University of Kansas have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(C), the four cultural items described above are specific ceremonial objects needed by traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by their present-day adherents. Officials of the University of Kansas also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(D), the four cultural items described above have ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. Lastly, officials of the University of Kansas have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred objects/objects of PO 00000 Frm 00030 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 12193 cultural patrimony and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the sacred objects/objects of cultural patrimony should contact Thomas A. Foor, NAGPRA Coordinator, ARCC, University of Kansas, Spooner Hall, 1340 Jayhawk Blvd., Room 5B, Lawrence, KS 66045–7500, telephone (785) 766–5476, before April 16, 2007. Repatriation of the sacred objects/ objects of cultural patrimony to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The University of Kansas is responsible for notifying the Hopi Tribe of Arizona that this notice has been published. Dated: January 24, 2007. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–4726 Filed 3–14–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement Notice of Proposed Information Collection for 1029–0057 and 1029– 0087 Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. AGENCY: SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSM) is announcing its intention to request renewed approval for the collections of information for 30 CFR Part 882, Reclamation of private lands; and 30 CFR 886.23(b) and Form OSM–76, Abandoned Mine Land Problem Area Description form. The collections described below have been forwarded to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and comment. The information collection request describes the nature of the information collections and the expected burdens and costs. DATES: OMB has up to 60 days to approve or disapprove the information collection but may respond after 30 days. Therefore, public comments should be submitted to OMB by April 16, 2007, in order to be assured of consideration. Comments may be submitted to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of ADDRESSES: E:\FR\FM\15MRN1.SGM 15MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 50 (Thursday, March 15, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 12192-12193]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-4733]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: University of 
Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the University of 
Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO, that meet the definition of 
``unassociated funerary objects'' under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural 
items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.
    Between 1954 and 1990, cultural items were legally excavated on 
private land near Yellow Jacket Pueblo (5MT5), Montezuma County, CO, by 
Dr. Joe Ben Wheat, during University of Colorado Museum sponsored 
archeological field schools. The excavated cultural items were 
collected from graves and legally transferred to the museum each 
season. The human remains were not collected due to deterioration or 
other circumstances. The 68 cultural items are 66 ceramic items (whole 
vessels, broken vessels, and sherd lots), 1 stone ax, and 1 bone awl.
    The three habitation sites, identified on the National Register of 
Historic Places as the Joe Ben Wheat Site Complex, are at the head of 
Yellow Jacket Canyon to the west of Tatum Draw and southwest of the 
very large archeological site, Yellow Jacket Pueblo. The Yellow Jacket 
burials were predominantly single interments, appearing in a wide 
variety of locations, including abandoned rooms and kivas, storage 
pits, subfloor burial pits, extramural burial pits, and middens.
    The habitation sites were occupied at various times during the 
Basketmaker III, Pueblo II, and Pueblo III periods, approximately A.D. 
550 - 1250, with a temporary abandonment during the Pueblo I period, 
approximately A.D. 750 - 900. Based on the general continuity in the 
material culture and the architecture of these sites, it appears that 
the community that lived in this area had long-standing ties to the 
region and returned to sites even after migrations away from the locale 
that lasted more than one hundred years. However, by the late 13th 
century, both the Yellow Jacket sites and the nearby Mesa Verde region 
showed no evidence of human habitation. The sites are not used again 
until the 1920s when the locale was homesteaded and farmed.
    The archeological evidence supports identification with Basketmaker 
and later Pueblo (Hisatsinom, Ancestral Puebloan, or Anasazi) cultures, 
which prehistorically occupied southwestern Colorado. Both Basketmaker 
and Pueblo occupations are represented in the archeology at the Yellow 
Jacket site. Archeologists have noted in the scientific literature the 
striking similarity between the technology and style of material 
culture of 13th century archeological sites in southwestern Colorado 
and the material culture remains of 14th century Puebloan sites in 
Arizona and New Mexico.
    Oral-tradition evidence, which consists of migration stories, clan 
histories, and origin stories, was provided by representatives of the 
Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; 
Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Ysleta del Sur, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New 
Mexico. Folkloric evidence in the form of songs was provided by tribal 
representatives of the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; 
and Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico.
    Tribal representatives of the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo 
of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; and Pueblo 
of Taos, New Mexico provided linguistic evidence rooted in place names. 
Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
San Ildefonso, New Mexico; and Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico 
provided archeological evidence based on architecture and material 
culture of their shared relationship.
    Archeological, historical and linguistic evidence presently points 
to Navajo migration to the Yellow Jacket and Monument Ruin area after 
A.D. 1300. During consultation, the Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico 
& Utah emphasized their long presence in the Four Corners and their 
origin in this area, but there is not a preponderance of the evidence 
to support Navajo cultural affiliation.
    Based on a preponderance of evidence, including oral tradition, 
folklore, linguistic, geographic, archeology, historical, and 
scientific studies, cultural affiliation can be traced between the 68 
unassociated funerary objects and modern Puebloan peoples. Modern 
Puebloan peoples are members of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of 
Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San 
Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa 
Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; 
Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, 
New Mexico.
    Officials of the University of Colorado Museum have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the 68 cultural items 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of an Native 
American individual. Officials of the University of Colorado Museum 
also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the unassociated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia,

[[Page 12193]]

New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; 
Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, 
New Mexico.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should 
contact Stephen Lekson, Curator of Anthropology, University of Colorado 
Museum, Henderson Building, Campus Box 218, Boulder, CO 80309-0218, 
telephone (303) 492-6671, before April 16, 2007. Repatriation of the 
unassociated funerary objects to the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico may 
proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    University of Colorado Museum is responsible for notifying the Hopi 
Tribe of Arizona; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Pueblo of 
Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San 
Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Juan, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa 
Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; 
Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; 
Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New 
Mexico & Utah; Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the 
Zuni Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published.

    Dated: February 2, 2007.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E7-4733 Filed 3-14-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S