Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement To Address Operational Changes at Center Hill Dam, Center Hill Lake, DeKalb County, TN, That Could Affect Pool Elevations, 8358-8359 [07-853]

Download as PDF 8358 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 37 / Monday, February 26, 2007 / Notices SUMMARY: In accordance with 37 CFR 404.6 and 404.7, announcement is made of the availability for licensing of the invention set forth in U.S. Patent No. 7,177,623 entitled ‘‘Localized Cellular Awareness and Tracking of Emergencies,’’ issued on February 13, 2007. The United States Government, as represented by the Secretary of the Army, has rights in this invention. Office of Research and Technology Applications, SDMC– RDTC–TDL (Ms. Susan D. McRae), Bldg. 5220, Von Braun Complex, Redstone Arsenal, AL 35898. ADDRESSES: Ms. Joan Gilsdorf, Patent Attorney, e-mail: joan.gilsdorf@smdc.army.mil (256) 955– 3213 or Ms. Susan D. McRae, Office of Research and Technology Applications, e-mail: susan.mcrae@smdc.army.mil; (256) 955–1501. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The invention pertains to establishing a three-way call between a wireless 911 caller, an emergency 911 dispatcher, and security/law enforcement personnel assigned to monitor a particular property. When a wireless 911 caller makes a 911 call from a specific property, the wireless network provides the caller’s automatic location identification (ALI) information to a Localized Cellular Awareness and Tracking of Emergencies (LoCATE) System Unit (LSU) before the call is routed to the 911 dispatcher. The LSU uses the ALI information to determine the phone numbers of the surveillance property’s assigned security/law enforcement personnel (e.g., a building security guard) and provides these phone numbers to the wireless network. The LSU requests the wireless network to establish a three-way call between the 911 caller, the 911 emergency dispatcher, and the surveillance property’s assigned security/law enforcement personnel. Thus, the invention provides a real-time communication link with a specific property’s assigned security/law enforcement personnel, who can provide the most immediate response to an emergency occurring at the property before the arrival of the traditional or official first responders who are dispatched by the 911 dispatcher. Possible surveillance applications include buildings, campuses, national monuments, crime zones, airports, sports arenas, parades, amusement ycherry on PROD1PC64 with NOTICES SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:03 Feb 23, 2007 Jkt 211001 parks, bridges, borders, highways, waterways, special events, etc. Brenda S. Bowen, Army Federal Register Liaison Officer. [FR Doc. 07–852 Filed 2–23–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3710–08–M DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement To Address Operational Changes at Center Hill Dam, Center Hill Lake, DeKalb County, TN, That Could Affect Pool Elevations Department of the Army, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The Corps of Engineers (Corps) is preparing a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) to address operational changes at Center Hill Dam that could affect pool elevations. Center Hill Dam impounds Center Hill Lake in central Tennessee. The DEIS is necessary to provide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance to address changes that could include, but are not limited to water quality, aquatic, riparian, and terrestrial habitat, recreation, water supply, flood storage, economics, hydropower production, and safety as a result of operating Center Hill Lake below normal pool elevations for extended periods of time. Several engineering studies have identified a heightened level of risk at Center Hill Dam due to increasing seepage problems under and around the dam. Since March 2005, the Corps has attempted to keep fall, winter and early spring lake levels from extreme rises due to high inflow. Seepage problems are made worse during continual high lake levels. As a result, the Corps plans to maintain lower lake levels, but still within the operations curve, to reduce pressure on the dam foundation, abutments, and rim walls until a permanent remedy is in place. A major grouting project to address the dam seepage is scheduled for the fall of 2007, followed by installation of a cutoff wall through the earthen portions of the dam and adjoining rim walls. Although not anticipated, the Corps may have to lower the lake pool significantly below the operating pool should seepage conditions worsen, or new information determine this action is necessary to reduce risk. This notice serves to initiate the NEPA process. The Corps plans to PO 00000 Frm 00022 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 prepare and circulate a DEIS which serves to cover possible impacts due to extreme changes in lake levels that could occur during the repair of the dam’s foundation and abutments. DATES: Written comments concerning issues to be considered in preparing the DEIS, must be received by the Corps of Engineers on or before March 28, 2007. ADDRESSES: Written comments on issues to be considered in the DEIS shall be mailed to: Joy Broach, Project Planning Branch, Nashville District Corps of Engineers, P.O. Box 1070 (PM–P), Nashville, TN 37202–1070. Comments may also be e-mailed to: CenterHill.Repair@lrn02.usace. army.mil. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For additional information concerning the notice, please contact Joy Broach, Environmental Team, (615) 736–7956, Linda Adcock, Center Hill Dam Seepage Major Rehabilitation Project Manager, (615) 736–5940, or Public Affairs Office, (615) 736–7161. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 1. Center Hill Dam was designed in the 1930s, constructed in the 1940s, and impounded in the early 1950s. The dam was built on karst geology using accepted engineering practices of the day. Since the 1960s, seepage flows through the dam’s right abutment and left rim wall have been monitored, and recently became a concern with increased seepage and development of turbid flows through springs below the left rim wall. Signs of seepage increase through the main dam and saddle dam foundations have also been noted. A formal risk assessment is currently being conducted to determine if a need exists to significantly alter lake levels outside the normal operations curve to reduce risk to people and property. 2. A comprehensive plan for repairs has been approved; however, these repairs will take a number of years to implement. Until the repairs are sufficiently complete, the Corps has determined that it is in the public’s interest to operate Center Hill Lake at the lower range of the operations curve. Many rehabilitation alternatives were considered and potential impacts analyzed and are discussed in the following NEPA documents: Proposed Center Hill Dam Seepage Rehabilitation, Environmental Assessment, July 2005; and Proposed Center Hill Dam Seepage Rehabilitation, Environmental Assessment Supplement 1, March 2006. These documents have been included by reference. No significant environmental and economic consequences are anticipated under current dam repair plans; however, E:\FR\FM\26FEN1.SGM 26FEN1 ycherry on PROD1PC64 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 37 / Monday, February 26, 2007 / Notices some water intakes and boat ramps may need to be extended for safe operation. 3. Though not expected, the Corps recognizes that if seepage conditions worsen, or new information determines that the lake elevations should be significantly changed to ensure the public’s health, safety, and welfare; then the following resources could be significantly impacted: (1) The cold-water fisheries both in the lake and tailwater; (2) Water quality throughout the Caney Fork River and downstream in the Cumberland River; (3) Federally listed threatened and endangered species; (4) Designated uses of the waterway including fish and aquatic life, livestock watering and wildlife, irrigation; (5) And economics including electric power production, municipal and industrial water supply, recreation, navigation, flood damage reduction, and disruption to communities, jobs, and other related factors. 4. Current Actions to Reduce Risk. Several actions have already been taken to reduce the risk. Prior to 2005, spring rains were captured in the reservoir to maximize downstream flood protection and hydropower generation. Beginning in March 2005, the pool was managed more aggressively to reduce inflow peaks and adhere more closely to the prescribed guide curves. In 2006, continuous surveillance was initiated at the dam. This involves providing patrols to monitor the dam, known seepage and trouble spots, and downstream areas. Currently, the Corps is conducting exploratory drilling to assess the limestone rock condition and key access points for future grouting activities. Additional coordination and exercises have been held with state and local emergency management agencies. These agencies will be provided flood inundation maps to help coordinate emergency evacuation planning. The Corps has improved its emergency notification procedures, increased instrumentation in, on, and around the dam, and conducted numerous public meetings to advise the public of problems with the dam. 5. A DEIS will be undertaken to review current actions taken and to consider other possible alternatives to reduce stress on the dam. 6. This notice serves to solicit comments from the public; Federal, State and local agencies and officials; Indian Tribes; and other interested parties in order to consider and evaluate impacts of these proposed activities. Any comments received by the agency will be considered in determining future operations. In the decision-making VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:03 Feb 23, 2007 Jkt 211001 process, comments are used to assess impacts on public health and safety, endangered species, historic properties, water quality, water supply and conservation, economics, aesthetics, wetlands, flood hazards, floodplain values, land use, navigation, shore erosion and accretion, recreation, energy needs, food and fiber production, mineral needs, considerations of property ownership, general environmental effects, and in general, the needs and welfare of the people. 7. Activities proposed that may require a review under the guidelines promulgated by the Administrator, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), under authority of Section 404(b)(1) of the Clean Water Act (40 CFR part 230) include fill placement for water intake extensions, boat ramp extensions, and other mitigation actions. 8. Other Federal, State, and local approvals that may be required for proposed work are as follows: a. Section 401 water quality certification from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. b. Coordination with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the Endangered Species Act and Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act. c. Coordination with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. d. Coordination with the State Historic Preservation Officer and President’s Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. 9. Significant issues to be analyzed in the DEIS include impacts to fisheries, tailwater mussel resources, water quality, flood control, recreation, navigation, water supply, electric power production, economics, and community development. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has agreed to be a Cooperating Agency on the DEIS. A DEIS should be available in June 2007. 10. Public Meetings: At present, no public meetings have been scheduled to scope for potential issues to be evaluated in the DEIS. Requests for public meetings should be directed to Mr. William Peoples, Chief, Public Affairs Office, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District, Nashville, TN, 37202–1070. Mr. Peoples may be reached by telephone at (615) 736–7834. Brenda S. Bowen, Army Federal Register Liaison Officer. [FR Doc. 07–853 Filed 2–23–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3710–GF–M PO 00000 Frm 00023 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 8359 DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Development of an Inlet Management Plan That Includes the Repositioning and Realignment of the Main Ebb Channel of Rich Inlet and To Use the Material To Nourish Figure Eight Island, North of Wilmington, New Hanover County, NC Department of the Army, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD. ACTION: Notice of intent. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE), Wilmington District, Wilmington Regulatory Field Office has received a request for Department of the Army authorization, pursuant to Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and Section 10 of the Rivers and Harbor Act, from Figure ‘‘8’’ Beach Homeowners Association to develop a management plan for Rich Inlet that would mitigate chronic erosion on the northern portion of Figure Eight Island so as to preserve the integrity of its infrastructure, provide protection to existing development, and ensure the continued use of the oceanfront beach along the northernmost three miles of its oceanfront shoreline. Figure Eight Island is an unincorporated privately developed island located on the southeast coast of North Carolina, approximately eight miles north of Wilmington. The island is bordered to the south by Mason Inlet and Wrightsville Beach; and to the north by Rich Inlet and Lea-Hutaff Island, an undeveloped, privately-owned island. The inlet management plan would involve the repositioning and realignment of the main ebb channel of Rich Inlet to a location closer to the north end of Figure Eight Island. The intended alignment is to be essentially perpendicular to the oceanfront shorelines of the adjacent islands. The new channel position would be periodically maintained with maintenance episodes dictated by natural shifts in the channel position that produce unfavorable shoreline responses on the north end of Figure Eight Island. While the main focus of the project is to relocate the main ebb bar channel, consideration will also be given to possible alterations in Nixon Channel and Green Channel to determine if such modification would enhance the stability of the new channel. Nixon Channel meanders along a southwesterly path on the landward E:\FR\FM\26FEN1.SGM 26FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 37 (Monday, February 26, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 8358-8359]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 07-853]


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DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers


Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement To 
Address Operational Changes at Center Hill Dam, Center Hill Lake, 
DeKalb County, TN, That Could Affect Pool Elevations

AGENCY: Department of the Army, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Corps of Engineers (Corps) is preparing a Draft 
Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) to address operational changes at 
Center Hill Dam that could affect pool elevations. Center Hill Dam 
impounds Center Hill Lake in central Tennessee. The DEIS is necessary 
to provide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance to 
address changes that could include, but are not limited to water 
quality, aquatic, riparian, and terrestrial habitat, recreation, water 
supply, flood storage, economics, hydropower production, and safety as 
a result of operating Center Hill Lake below normal pool elevations for 
extended periods of time. Several engineering studies have identified a 
heightened level of risk at Center Hill Dam due to increasing seepage 
problems under and around the dam. Since March 2005, the Corps has 
attempted to keep fall, winter and early spring lake levels from 
extreme rises due to high inflow. Seepage problems are made worse 
during continual high lake levels. As a result, the Corps plans to 
maintain lower lake levels, but still within the operations curve, to 
reduce pressure on the dam foundation, abutments, and rim walls until a 
permanent remedy is in place. A major grouting project to address the 
dam seepage is scheduled for the fall of 2007, followed by installation 
of a cutoff wall through the earthen portions of the dam and adjoining 
rim walls. Although not anticipated, the Corps may have to lower the 
lake pool significantly below the operating pool should seepage 
conditions worsen, or new information determine this action is 
necessary to reduce risk. This notice serves to initiate the NEPA 
process. The Corps plans to prepare and circulate a DEIS which serves 
to cover possible impacts due to extreme changes in lake levels that 
could occur during the repair of the dam's foundation and abutments.

DATES: Written comments concerning issues to be considered in preparing 
the DEIS, must be received by the Corps of Engineers on or before March 
28, 2007.

ADDRESSES: Written comments on issues to be considered in the DEIS 
shall be mailed to: Joy Broach, Project Planning Branch, Nashville 
District Corps of Engineers, P.O. Box 1070 (PM-P), Nashville, TN 37202-
1070. Comments may also be e-mailed to: 
CenterHill.Repair@lrn02.usace.army.mil.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For additional information concerning 
the notice, please contact Joy Broach, Environmental Team, (615) 736-
7956, Linda Adcock, Center Hill Dam Seepage Major Rehabilitation 
Project Manager, (615) 736-5940, or Public Affairs Office, (615) 736-
7161.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
    1. Center Hill Dam was designed in the 1930s, constructed in the 
1940s, and impounded in the early 1950s. The dam was built on karst 
geology using accepted engineering practices of the day. Since the 
1960s, seepage flows through the dam's right abutment and left rim wall 
have been monitored, and recently became a concern with increased 
seepage and development of turbid flows through springs below the left 
rim wall. Signs of seepage increase through the main dam and saddle dam 
foundations have also been noted. A formal risk assessment is currently 
being conducted to determine if a need exists to significantly alter 
lake levels outside the normal operations curve to reduce risk to 
people and property.
    2. A comprehensive plan for repairs has been approved; however, 
these repairs will take a number of years to implement. Until the 
repairs are sufficiently complete, the Corps has determined that it is 
in the public's interest to operate Center Hill Lake at the lower range 
of the operations curve. Many rehabilitation alternatives were 
considered and potential impacts analyzed and are discussed in the 
following NEPA documents: Proposed Center Hill Dam Seepage 
Rehabilitation, Environmental Assessment, July 2005; and Proposed 
Center Hill Dam Seepage Rehabilitation, Environmental Assessment 
Supplement 1, March 2006. These documents have been included by 
reference. No significant environmental and economic consequences are 
anticipated under current dam repair plans; however,

[[Page 8359]]

some water intakes and boat ramps may need to be extended for safe 
operation.
    3. Though not expected, the Corps recognizes that if seepage 
conditions worsen, or new information determines that the lake 
elevations should be significantly changed to ensure the public's 
health, safety, and welfare; then the following resources could be 
significantly impacted:
    (1) The cold-water fisheries both in the lake and tailwater;
    (2) Water quality throughout the Caney Fork River and downstream in 
the Cumberland River;
    (3) Federally listed threatened and endangered species;
    (4) Designated uses of the waterway including fish and aquatic 
life, livestock watering and wildlife, irrigation;
    (5) And economics including electric power production, municipal 
and industrial water supply, recreation, navigation, flood damage 
reduction, and disruption to communities, jobs, and other related 
factors.
    4. Current Actions to Reduce Risk. Several actions have already 
been taken to reduce the risk. Prior to 2005, spring rains were 
captured in the reservoir to maximize downstream flood protection and 
hydropower generation. Beginning in March 2005, the pool was managed 
more aggressively to reduce inflow peaks and adhere more closely to the 
prescribed guide curves. In 2006, continuous surveillance was initiated 
at the dam. This involves providing patrols to monitor the dam, known 
seepage and trouble spots, and downstream areas. Currently, the Corps 
is conducting exploratory drilling to assess the limestone rock 
condition and key access points for future grouting activities. 
Additional coordination and exercises have been held with state and 
local emergency management agencies. These agencies will be provided 
flood inundation maps to help coordinate emergency evacuation planning. 
The Corps has improved its emergency notification procedures, increased 
instrumentation in, on, and around the dam, and conducted numerous 
public meetings to advise the public of problems with the dam.
    5. A DEIS will be undertaken to review current actions taken and to 
consider other possible alternatives to reduce stress on the dam.
    6. This notice serves to solicit comments from the public; Federal, 
State and local agencies and officials; Indian Tribes; and other 
interested parties in order to consider and evaluate impacts of these 
proposed activities. Any comments received by the agency will be 
considered in determining future operations. In the decision-making 
process, comments are used to assess impacts on public health and 
safety, endangered species, historic properties, water quality, water 
supply and conservation, economics, aesthetics, wetlands, flood 
hazards, floodplain values, land use, navigation, shore erosion and 
accretion, recreation, energy needs, food and fiber production, mineral 
needs, considerations of property ownership, general environmental 
effects, and in general, the needs and welfare of the people.
    7. Activities proposed that may require a review under the 
guidelines promulgated by the Administrator, Environmental Protection 
Agency (EPA), under authority of Section 404(b)(1) of the Clean Water 
Act (40 CFR part 230) include fill placement for water intake 
extensions, boat ramp extensions, and other mitigation actions.
    8. Other Federal, State, and local approvals that may be required 
for proposed work are as follows:
    a. Section 401 water quality certification from the Tennessee 
Department of Environment and Conservation.
    b. Coordination with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for the 
Endangered Species Act and Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act.
    c. Coordination with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.
    d. Coordination with the State Historic Preservation Officer and 
President's Advisory Council on Historic Preservation.
    9. Significant issues to be analyzed in the DEIS include impacts to 
fisheries, tailwater mussel resources, water quality, flood control, 
recreation, navigation, water supply, electric power production, 
economics, and community development. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service has agreed to be a Cooperating Agency on the DEIS. A DEIS 
should be available in June 2007.
    10. Public Meetings: At present, no public meetings have been 
scheduled to scope for potential issues to be evaluated in the DEIS. 
Requests for public meetings should be directed to Mr. William Peoples, 
Chief, Public Affairs Office, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville 
District, Nashville, TN, 37202-1070. Mr. Peoples may be reached by 
telephone at (615) 736-7834.

Brenda S. Bowen,
Army Federal Register Liaison Officer.
[FR Doc. 07-853 Filed 2-23-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3710-GF-M