Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum, Ellensburg, WA, 5736-5737 [E7-1970]

Download as PDF sroberts on PROD1PC70 with NOTICES 5736 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 25 / Wednesday, February 7, 2007 / Notices States. Physical anthropologists who examined the human remains estimate them to be less than 500 years old. Consultation information provided by the tribe, archeological information, and expert opinion also indicate that the human remains are likely associated with the Umatilla site, a Late Prehistoric to Historic Umatilla village. Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and post–contact territory of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon. In 1882, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals were collected from Old Wallula, Walla Walla County, WA. The human remains were purchased by the American Museum of Natural History from Mr. Terry in 1891. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The individuals have been identified as Native American based on the presence of cranial reshaping in some of the human remains and the collector’s practice of only collecting cultural items related to Native Americans from the United States. Physical anthropologists who examined the human remains estimate them to be less than 500 years old. Expert opinion also indicates that the human remains are likely to be of recent age. Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and post– contact territory of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of eight individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Nell Murphy, Director of Cultural Resources, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024–5192, telephone (212) 769–5837, before March 9, 2007. Repatriation of the human remains to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The American Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla VerDate Aug<31>2005 21:36 Feb 06, 2007 Jkt 211001 Reservation, Oregon that this notice has been published. Dated: January 19, 2007. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–1968 Filed 2–6–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum, Ellensburg, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum, Ellensburg, WA. The human remains were removed from Ferry and Okanogan Counties, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington. In 1958, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from a terrace 15 feet from Kettle River in Ferry County, WA, by University of Washington Museum staff, and were accessioned by the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington, Seattle, WA (Burke Accession 1963–70). In 1974, the Burke Museum legally transferred the human remains to the Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Based on skeletal morphology and geographic and accession documentation, the human remains are PO 00000 Frm 00062 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 of Native American ancestry. Ferry County is located within the aboriginal territory of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington. Ethnographic sources identify Ferry County as an area associated with the Colville Band (Kennedy and Bouchard 1998; Mooney 1896; Ray 1936; Spier 1936; Swanton 1952). The Colville Band is one of the twelve tribes and bands that compose the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington. In 1960, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals were removed from land adjacent to Washington State Highway 20, three miles east of Tonasket in Okanogan County, WA, by a Washington State Highway Department crew. The Washington State Highway Department gave the human remains to the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office. The Okanogan County Sheriff sent the human remains to the University of Washington School of Medicine’s Anatomy Department for identification. The Burke Museum accessioned the human remains in 1965 (Burke Accession 1965–55). In 1974, the Burke Museum legally transferred the human remains to Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Based on morphological evidence, the human remains are Native American. The northern area of Okanogan County was part of the aboriginal and historic territory of the Okanogan people. Geographic affiliation is consistent with the historically documented territory of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington. The Okanogan Band is one of the twelve tribes and bands that compose the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington. Officials of Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of five individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Lourdes Henebry- E:\FR\FM\07FEN1.SGM 07FEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 25 / Wednesday, February 7, 2007 / Notices DeLeon, NAGPRA Program Director, Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum, 400 East University Way, Ellensburg, WA 98926–7544, telephone (509) 963–2671, before March 9, 2007. Repatriation of the human remains to the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington that this notice has been published. Dated: December 18, 2006. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–1970 Filed 2–6–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum, Ellensburg, WA, and Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: sroberts on PROD1PC70 with NOTICES ACTION: National Park Service, Interior. Notice. Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum, Ellensburg, WA, and Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from a site upriver from the McNary Dam in Benton County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. VerDate Aug<31>2005 21:36 Feb 06, 2007 Jkt 211001 A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Burke Museum and Central Washington University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon; and Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. In 1965, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from a rock shelter approximately six miles east of the McNary Dam (possibly site 45BN5) in Benton County, WA, by Ray Dunn and Fred Hendrix. Mr. Dunn and Mr. Hendrix donated the human remains to the Burke Museum in 1966 (Burke Accn. #1966–11). A portion of the human remains were transferred from the Burke Museum to Central Washington University in 1974. No known individuals were identified. The 107 associated funerary objects are 102 shell beads, 1 piece of cordage, and 4 wood fragments. Early and late ethnographic sources identify the area six miles east of the McNary Dam area territory of the Cayuse, Walla Walla, and Umatilla tribes (Hale 1841; Stern 1998; Ray 1936). The Cayuse, Walla Walla, and Umatilla were separate tribes prior to the treaty on June 9, 1855, but were removed to the Umatilla Reservation under the terms of the Walla Walla Treaty. The three tribes were officially confederated in 1949. The area east of McNary Dam was heavily utilized by the Umatilla, including the spring and summer camp tu’woyepa on the Oregon side of the Columbia River (Ray 1936), the Umatilla fishing site wanaket (Lane and Lane 1979), and the small fishing village xululupa on the Washington side of the Columbia River (Ray 1936). The human remains evidence extreme dental attrition, a trait that is common for Columbia plateau populations. The practice of burying individuals with personal belongings, including shell beads, is consistent with documented prehistoric and historic practices of the tribes that are members of the present– day Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon. The area six miles east from the McNary Dam is within the aboriginal territory of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon as determined by the Indian Claims Commission. The human remains have been determined to be Native American PO 00000 Frm 00063 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 5737 based on geographic, historical, and osteological evidence, and culturally affiliated to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon. Officials of the Burke Museum and Central Washington University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Burke Museum and Central Washington University also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 107 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Burke Museum and Central Washington University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Dr. Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195–3010, telephone (206) 685–2282 or Lourdes HenebryDeLeon, NAGPRA Program Director, Department of Anthropology and Museum, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA 98926– 7544, telephone (509) 963–2671, before March 9, 2007. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; Confederated Tribes the Colville Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon; and Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon that this notice has been published. Dated: January 18, 2007. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E7–1971 Filed 2–6–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S E:\FR\FM\07FEN1.SGM 07FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 25 (Wednesday, February 7, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 5736-5737]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-1970]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University, 
Department of Anthropology and Museum, Ellensburg, WA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of Central 
Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum, 
Ellensburg, WA. The human remains were removed from Ferry and Okanogan 
Counties, WA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Central 
Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington.
    In 1958, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were removed from a terrace 15 feet from Kettle River in Ferry County, 
WA, by University of Washington Museum staff, and were accessioned by 
the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), 
University of Washington, Seattle, WA (Burke Accession 1963-70). In 
1974, the Burke Museum legally transferred the human remains to the 
Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum. 
No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Based on skeletal morphology and geographic and accession 
documentation, the human remains are of Native American ancestry. Ferry 
County is located within the aboriginal territory of the Confederated 
Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington. Ethnographic sources 
identify Ferry County as an area associated with the Colville Band 
(Kennedy and Bouchard 1998; Mooney 1896; Ray 1936; Spier 1936; Swanton 
1952). The Colville Band is one of the twelve tribes and bands that 
compose the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, 
Washington.
    In 1960, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals 
were removed from land adjacent to Washington State Highway 20, three 
miles east of Tonasket in Okanogan County, WA, by a Washington State 
Highway Department crew. The Washington State Highway Department gave 
the human remains to the Okanogan County Sheriff's Office. The Okanogan 
County Sheriff sent the human remains to the University of Washington 
School of Medicine's Anatomy Department for identification. The Burke 
Museum accessioned the human remains in 1965 (Burke Accession 1965-55). 
In 1974, the Burke Museum legally transferred the human remains to 
Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and Museum. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
are present.
    Based on morphological evidence, the human remains are Native 
American. The northern area of Okanogan County was part of the 
aboriginal and historic territory of the Okanogan people. Geographic 
affiliation is consistent with the historically documented territory of 
the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington. The 
Okanogan Band is one of the twelve tribes and bands that compose the 
Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington.
    Officials of Central Washington University, Department of 
Anthropology and Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 
3001 (9-10), the human remains described above represent the physical 
remains of five individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of 
the Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and 
Museum have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there 
is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably 
traced between the Native American human remains and the Confederated 
Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Lourdes 
Henebry-

[[Page 5737]]

DeLeon, NAGPRA Program Director, Central Washington University, 
Department of Anthropology and Museum, 400 East University Way, 
Ellensburg, WA 98926-7544, telephone (509) 963-2671, before March 9, 
2007. Repatriation of the human remains to the Confederated Tribes of 
the Colville Reservation, Washington may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    The Central Washington University, Department of Anthropology and 
Museum is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the 
Colville Reservation, Washington that this notice has been published.

    Dated: December 18, 2006.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E7-1970 Filed 2-6-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S