Sunshine Act; Notice of Meeting, 2527-2528 [07-220]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 12 / Friday, January 19, 2007 / Notices sroberts on PROD1PC70 with NOTICES manage their risks. At this time, different disclosure practices and requirements for payments and settlement systems have resulted in varying levels of information being disseminated to users and others. Users and other persons may find it difficult to obtain access to sufficient information to understand and assess a particular system’s approach to risk management against internationally accepted principles and minimum standards. Broadening the availability of information concerning a system’s risk management controls, governance, and legal framework, for example, can facilitate this understanding and analysis and also assist those interested in a system in evaluating and managing any risk exposure.24 The Board believes that the implementation of the applicable principles and minimum standards by systemically important systems can foster greater financial stability in payments and settlement systems. The Board further believes that operators of systemically important systems are well positioned to assess and demonstrate the extent to which they have implemented the principles or minimum standards in this policy. Therefore, in furtherance of its policy objectives, the Board expects systemically important systems subject to its authority to complete comprehensive, objective selfassessments against the applicable principles or minimum standards in this policy and disclose publicly the results of these efforts. Adopting this selfassessment framework, however, does not preclude the Federal Reserve from independently assessing compliance of systemically important systems with relevant rules, regulations, and Federal Reserve policies. The Board expects systemically important systems subject to its authority to complete self-assessments based on the following guidelines. First, systemically important systems are expected to document the basis for their self-assessment and support any conclusions regarding the extent to which they meet a particular principle or minimum standard.25 System 24 The Board considers self-assessments as only one resource for users and other persons to consider when evaluating any risks associated with a particular system. In order to effectively identify and manage risks, a user or other interested person may need to consider other relevant documentation such as the system’s rules, operating procedures, or organizational documents. These materials may be publicly available or may need to be requested from the system directly. 25 While the Board expects self-assessments to be robust, it does not expect payments and settlement systems to disclose publicly sensitive information VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:10 Jan 18, 2007 Jkt 211001 operators should use one of the following assessment categories to describe the extent to which the system meets a particular principle or minimum standard: Observed, broadly observed, partly observed, or nonobserved. The CPSS and CPSS–IOSCO have developed implementation guidelines and assessment methodologies that can assist system operators in structuring their selfassessments and assigning an assessment category. Accordingly, payment system operators are encouraged to consult Section 7 of the Core Principles for guidance when developing their self-assessments and in measuring the extent to which the system meets each principle.26 Likewise system operators for securities settlement systems and central counterparties are encouraged to consult the assessment methodology for the relevant minimum standards for further guidance on each minimum standard and are encouraged to respond to the key questions included therein.27 A system may consult the Board for assistance with respect to the principles and minimum standards and the completion of its assessment. Second, to further ensure system accountability for accuracy and completeness, the Board expects the system’s senior management and board of directors to review and approve self-assessments upon completion. Third, to achieve broad disclosure, the system is expected to make its self-assessments readily available to the public, such as by posting the self-assessment on the system’s public Web site. Finally, in order for self-assessments to reflect correctly the system’s current rules, procedures, and operations, the Board expects a systemically important system to update the relevant parts of its selfassessment following material changes to the system or its environment. At a minimum, a systemically important system would be expected to review its 2527 self-assessment every two years to ensure continued accuracy. As part of its ongoing oversight of systemically important payments and settlement systems, the Federal Reserve will review published self-assessments by systems subject to the Board’s authority to ensure the Board’s policy objectives and expectations are being met.28 Where necessary, the Federal Reserve will provide feedback to these systems regarding the content of their self-assessments and their effectiveness in achieving the policy objectives discussed above.29 The Board acknowledges that payments and settlement systems vary in terms of the scope of instruments they settle and markets they serve. It also recognizes that systems may operate under different legal and regulatory constraints and within particular market infrastructures or institutional frameworks. The Board will consider these factors when reviewing selfassessments and in evaluating how a systemically important system addresses a particular principle or minimum standard and complies with the policy generally. Where the Board does not have exclusive authority over a systemically important system, it will encourage appropriate domestic or foreign financial system authorities to promote self-assessments by systemically important systems as a means to achieve greater safety and efficiency in the financial system. By order of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, January 11, 2007. Robert deV. Frierson, Deputy Secretary of the Board. [FR Doc. E7–589 Filed 1–18–07; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6210–01–P FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD Sunshine Act; Notice of Meeting TIME AND DATE: 8:30 a.m. (EST), January 22, 2007. that would expose system vulnerabilities or otherwise put the system at risk (e.g., specific business continuity plans). 26 The Core Principles include implementation guidelines and an implementation summary for each principle. The guidelines provide both detailed explanations of each principle and general examples of ways to interpret and implement them. 27 In November 2002, CPSS–IOSCO published an Assessment Methodology for the Recommendations for SSS, which is available at http://www.bis.org/ publ/cpss51.htm. In November 2004, CPSS–IOSCO published the CCP Recommendations and an Assessment Methodology, which are available at http://www.bis.org/publ/cpss64.htm. These assessment methodologies for the CPSS–IOSCO Recommendations include key questions to assist an assessor in determining to what extent a system meets a particular minimum standard. PO 00000 Frm 00038 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 28 Any review of an assessment by the Federal Reserve should not be viewed as an approval or guarantee of the accuracy of a system’s selfassessment. Furthermore, the contents of a review of a self-assessment would be subject to the Board’s rules regarding disclosure of confidential supervisory information. Therefore, without the express approval of the Board, a system would not be allowed to state publicly that its self-assessment has been reviewed, endorsed, approved, or otherwise not objected to by the Federal Reserve. 29 If the Federal Reserve materially disagrees with the content of a system’s self-assessment, it will communicate its concerns to the system’s senior management and possibly to its board of directors, as appropriate. The Federal Reserve may also discuss its concerns with other relevant financial system authorities, as appropriate. E:\FR\FM\19JAN1.SGM 19JAN1 2528 Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 12 / Friday, January 19, 2007 / Notices 4th Floor Conference Room, 1250 H Street, NW., Washington, DC. STATUS: Closed to the public. MATTERS TO BE CONSIDERED: Personnel. PLACE: CONTACT PERSON FOR MORE INFORMATION: Thomas J. Trabucco, Director, Office of External Affairs, (202) 942–1640. Dated: January 16, 2007. Thomas K. Emswiler, Secretary to the Board, Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board. [FR Doc. 07–220 Filed 1–16–07; 4:42 pm] control through field investigations. The CDC National Disease Surveillance Program is based on the premise that diseases cannot be diagnosed, prevented, or controlled until existing knowledge is expanded and new ideas developed and implemented. Over the years, the mandate of CDC has broadened to include preventive health activities and the surveillance systems maintained have expanded. CDC and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) collect data on disease and preventable conditions in accordance with jointly approved plans. Changes in the surveillance program and in reporting methods are effected in the same manner. At the onset of this surveillance program in 1968, the CSTE and CDC decided on which diseases warranted surveillance. These diseases are reviewed and revised based on variations in the public’s health. Surveillance forms are distributed to the State and local health departments who voluntarily submit these reports to CDC at variable frequencies, either weekly or monthly. CDC then calculates and publishes weekly statistics via the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), providing the states with timely aggregates of their submissions. The following diseases/conditions are included in this program: Diarrheal disease surveillance (includes campylobacter, salmonella, and shigella), foodborne outbreaks, arboviral surveillance (ArboNet), Influenza virus (includes the annual survey and influenza-like illness), Respiratory and Enterovirus surveillance, rabies, waterborne diseases, cholera and other vibrio illnesses, calicivirus surveillance, and Listeria case form. These data are essential on the local, state, and Federal levels for measuring trends in diseases, evaluating the effectiveness of current prevention strategies, and determining the need for modifying current prevention measures. This request is for approval of the data collection for three years. Because of the distinct nature of each of the diseases, the number of cases reported annually is different for each. There is no cost to respondents other than their time. The total estimated annualized burden hours are 21,107. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Larry Elliott, Director, Office of Compensation Analysis and Support, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), 4676 Columbia Parkway, MS C–46, Cincinnati, OH 45226, Telephone 513– 533–6800 (this is not a toll-free number). Information requests can also be submitted by e-mail to OCAS@CDC.GOV. BILLING CODE 6760–01–P Dated: January 12, 2007. John Howard, Director, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. [FR Doc. 07–194 Filed 1–18–07; 8:45 am] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES BILLING CODE 4163–19–M National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; Decision to Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees at Hanford Nuclear Reservation, Richland, WA, To Be Included in the Special Exposure Cohort DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice. Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review AGENCY: SUMMARY: The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) gives notice as required by 42 CFR 83.12(e) of a decision to evaluate a petition to designate a class of employees at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, Richland, Washington, to be included in the Special Exposure Cohort under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000. The initial proposed definition for the class being evaluated, subject to revision as warranted by the evaluation, is as follows: Facility: Hanford Nuclear Reservation. Location: Richland,Washington. Job Title and/or Job Duties: All former Dupont production workers in the 100 area and the 300 area and all 200 area production workers and all guards and construction workers. Period of Employment: January 1, 1943 through September 1, 1946 for former Dupont production workers in the 100 and 300 areas and December 1, 1944 through September 1, 1946 for all 200 area production workers and all guards and construction workers. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [30Day–07–0004] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) publishes a list of information collection requests under review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35). To request a copy of these requests, call the CDC Reports Clearance Officer at (404) 639–5960 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Send written comments to CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC or by fax to (202) 395–6974. Written comments should be received within 30 days of this notice. Proposed Project National Disease Surveillance Program—II. Disease Summaries (0920– 0004)—Revision—National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases (proposed) (NCPDCID), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Background and Brief Description Surveillance of the incidence and distribution of disease has been an important function of the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) since 1878. Through the years, PHS/CDC has formulated practical methods of disease sroberts on PROD1PC70 with NOTICES ESTIMATE OF ANNUALIZED BURDEN HOURS Number of respondents Form Diarrheal Disease Surveillance: —Campylobacter (electronic) ............................................................................................... VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:10 Jan 18, 2007 Jkt 211001 PO 00000 Frm 00039 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\19JAN1.SGM 53 19JAN1 Number of responses 52 Avg. burden 3/60

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 12 (Friday, January 19, 2007)]
[Notices]
[Pages 2527-2528]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 07-220]


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FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD


Sunshine Act; Notice of Meeting

Time and Date: 8:30 a.m. (EST), January 22, 2007.

[[Page 2528]]


Place: 4th Floor Conference Room, 1250 H Street, NW., Washington, DC.

Status: Closed to the public.

Matters to be Considered: Personnel.

Contact Person for More Information: Thomas J. Trabucco, Director, 
Office of External Affairs, (202) 942-1640.

    Dated: January 16, 2007.
Thomas K. Emswiler,
Secretary to the Board, Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board.
[FR Doc. 07-220 Filed 1-16-07; 4:42 pm]
BILLING CODE 6760-01-P