Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY, 78459-78461 [E6-22343]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 250 / Friday, December 29, 2006 / Notices pwalker on PROD1PC69 with NOTICES subjective analysis of the information provided, which often includes copies of rare documents and photographs. Much of the information is submitted in electronic format, but at the present time, it is not practicable to gather all of the required information electronically. Descriptive of respondents: The affected publics are State, tribal, and local governments, Federal agencies, businesses, non-profit organizations, and individuals throughout the United States. Nominations to the Network are voluntary. Estimated average annual number of respondents: 70. Estimated average annual number of responses: 70. Estimated average burden hours per response: 15. Estimated frequency of response: once per respondent. Estimated annual reporting burden: 1050 hours. There were no public comments received as a result of publishing in theFederal Register a 60-day notice [published October 12, 2006 (71 FR 60180)] of intention to renew clearance of this information collection. Comments from seven respondents were collected from a small sample of present and potential applicants to the program. Three comments regarded making downloading the form from our Web site earlier. With applicants, we address this problem by sending the form electronically. upon request. One comment regarded the complexity of requirements and instructions; we address this issue by electronically sending a sample or samples of successful applications to potential applicants when they inform use of their intent to apply. The comments from the public outreach did not affect our estimate of the public burden. The public now has a second opportunity to comment. Comments are invited on (1) The need for the information including whether the information has practical utility; (2) the accuracy of this reporting burden estimate; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected on respondents, including the use of automated collection techniques of other forms of information technology. All comments will become a matter of public record. Doris Lowery, NPS Information Collection Clearance Officer, Washington Administrative Program Center. [FR Doc. 06–9946 Filed 12–27–06; 11:52 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–M VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:15 Dec 28, 2006 Jkt 211001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service 30-Day Notice of Submission to OMB of Request for Extension of Information Collection Number 1024– 0026; Opportunity for Public Comment National Park Service, Interior. Notice of submission to OMB and request for comments. AGENCY: ACTION: SUMMARY: Under the Provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104–13, 44 U.S.C. 3507) and 5 CFR part 1320 Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements, the National Park Service (NPS) is submitting to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request for extension of three (3) information collection forms and relevant NPS regulations currently approved under OMB control number 1024–0026 that are associated with permits pertaining to special public uses of NPS-managed lands. DATES: Public comments on this request must be received by January 29, 2007 to be assured of consideration. ADDRESSES: Send comments to the Desk Officer for the Interior Department, OMB Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, via facsimile to 202– 395–6566, or by e-mail to OIRA_DOCKET@omb.eop.gov. Please send a copy of your comments to Leonard Stowe, National Park Service, 1849 C Street, NW. (2605), Washington, DC 20240 or by e-mail to Leonard_Stowe@nps.gov. Lee Dickinson, Special Park Uses Program Manager, National Park Service at 202– 513–7092 or by e-mail at Lee_Dickinson@nps.gov. Copies of the permit application forms may be obtained from the Internet at: http:// www.nps.gov/policy/DOrders/ Permitforms.pdf. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Under NPS regulations, the information gathered is used to determined the presence or absence of derogation of the resource and allow the park manager to make a valued judgment as to whether or not to allow the requested permit. The uses considered under these permit applications generally include but are not limited to special events, filming and photography, and grazing in parks where such activity is authorized by law. (1) Title: Special Park Use Applications (Portions of 36 CFR 1–7, 3, 20, 34). (2) NPS Form Numbers: 10–930, 10– 931, 10–932. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00065 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 78459 (3) OMB Control Number: 1024–0026. (4) Current Expiration Date: December 31, 2006. (5) Type of Request: Extension of currently approved collection. (6) Description of Applicants: Individuals, not-for-profit institutions, for-profit business. (7) Estimated Annual Number of Applicants: 18,600. (8) Estimated Annual Number of Submissions: 18,600. (9) Estimated Total Annual Burden: 11,150 hours. (10) Non-hour cost of $50 per submission for filing fee. Public comments were received a during a 60-day public comment period (71 FR 61069) that closed December 18, 2006. One commenter requested a copy of the entire Information Collection Request associated with the FR notice. The second commenter requested that information on the types of activities permitted through special park use permits be available to the public. No changes were made to the information collection renewal request as a result of these comments. The public has a second opportunity to submit comments at this time, as to: (1) Whether the collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the bureau, including whether the information will have practical utility; (2) The accuracy of the bureau’s estimate of the burden of the collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (3) The quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) How to minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including the use of appropriate automated electronic, mechanical, or other forms of information technology. All comments will become a matter of public record. Davis Lowery Acting NPS Information Collection Clearance Officer. [FR Doc. 06–9947 Filed 12–27–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–M DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves E:\FR\FM\29DEN1.SGM 29DEN1 pwalker on PROD1PC69 with NOTICES 78460 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 250 / Friday, December 29, 2006 / Notices Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY. The human remains and associated funerary objects were collected from Bronx County, Kings County, New York County, Queens County, and Westchester County, NY. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by American Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma (now part of the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma); and Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin. In 1898, human remains representing a minimum of seven individuals were collected by Raymond M. Harrington from Croton Neck, Croton-on-Hudson, Westchester County, NY. In 1899, the human remains were acquired by the museum as a gift from William R. Warren. No known individuals were identified. The 20 associated funerary objects are 2 oyster shells, 14 paintstone fragments, 3 chert pebbles, and 1 clay smoking pipe, which dates to the late 17th or early 18th century and is apparently of British manufacture. The individuals have been identified as Native American based on the presence of items of Native American manufacture. Flexed burials and the relative scarcity of funerary objects are consistent with Late Woodland period burial practices. Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and postcontact territory of the ‘‘Kitchawonck,’’ a Munsee Delaware Indian group. In 1899, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals were collected by M. Raymond Harrington from the south shore of Le Roy Bay, Pelham Bay Park, Bronx County, NY, during an expedition sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History. No known individuals were identified. The 14 associated funerary objects are 4 shell pieces, 5 stone chips, 2 pottery sherds, 1 stone scraper, 1 mica ornament, and 1 piece of elk bone. VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:15 Dec 28, 2006 Jkt 211001 The individuals have been identified as Native American based on the presence of a large Native American habitation site and the presence of items of Native American manufacture. The human remains recovered from the Le Roy Bay site are considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 1100). Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and post-contact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups. In 1899, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were collected by M. Raymond Harrington from a shell-filled pit on the Ryder property, Avenue U vicinity, Marine Park, Kings County, NY, during an American Museum of Natural History expedition. The American Museum of Natural History acquired the human remains and associated funerary objects later that same year as part of this expedition. No known individual was identified. The approximately 192 associated funerary objects are 1 pipe bowl, 10 shells, 2 bone tools, 10 pottery fragments, 12 stone chips, 1 piece of crab claw, 6 turtle shell fragments, and a minimum of 150 animal bones. The individual has been identified as Native American based on the mode of burial and the presence of items of Native American manufacture. Based on the literature and the burial context, the human remains are considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 1100). Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and postcontact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups. Possibly in 1900, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were collected by M. Raymond Harrington, from a camp burial site at Avenue U and Ryder’s Pond, Marine Park, Kings County, NY. The museum acquired the human remains in 1900 as a gift from Mr. Putnam, who supported Mr. Harrington’s expeditions. No known individual was identified. The 111 associated funerary objects are 1 pipe stem; 2 sinkers; 32 animal, bird, fish, and turtle bones; 5 stone tools; 1 bone tool; and 70 hickory shells and charcoal fragments. The individual has been identified as Native American based on presence of a Native American occupation site and the presence of items of Native American manufacture. Based on the literature and the burial context, the human remains are considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 1100). Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and postcontact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups. PO 00000 Frm 00066 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 In 1907, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were collected by Reginald P. Bolton and W.L. Calver from a shell pit in Corbet’s Garden, 160 feet west of the west side of Cooper Street, 220 feet south of Hawthorne Street, Inwood, New York County, NY. The American Museum of Natural History purchased the human remains and associated funerary objects from Mr. Bolton in 1910. No known individual was identified. The 194 associated funerary objects are 77 shell fragments, 32 pottery fragments, and 85 sturgeon scale fragments. The individual has been identified as Native American based on the mode of burial and the presence of items of Native American manufacture. Based on the literature and the burial context, the human remains are considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 1100). Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and postcontact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups. In 1907 and 1908, human remains representing a minimum of 14 individuals were collected by Reginald P. Bolton and W.L. Carver from Seaman Avenue, Inwood, New York County, NY. The human remains were purchased by the museum in 1910. No known individuals were identified. The 35 associated funerary objects are 32 oyster shells, 1 stone, 1 pottery fragment, and 1 stone point. The individuals have been identified as Native American based on the presence of a native shell refuse heap and the presence of items of Native American manufacture. The site from which the human remains were collected has been identified as a Late Woodland to early contact period site. Based on the literature, the burial context of the human remains, and the lack of associated items from the Historic period, the human remains are considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 1100). Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and postcontact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups. In 1939, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were collected by Ralph Solecki from a shell pit at the head of Hawtree Creek, an arm of Jamaica Bay, Aquaduct, Queens County, NY. The American Museum of Natural History received the human remains from Mr. Solecki as a gift in 1947. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are one oyster shell and one pottery fragment. The individuals have been identified as Native American based on the mode of burial and the presence of an item of E:\FR\FM\29DEN1.SGM 29DEN1 pwalker on PROD1PC69 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 250 / Friday, December 29, 2006 / Notices Native American manufacture. Based on the literature and the burial context of the human remains, the human remains are considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 1100). Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and postcontact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups. In the late 1950s, human remains representing a minimum of 29 individuals were collected by Mr. E.J. Kaeser from an ossuary at the Archery Range site, Pelham Bay Park, Bronx County, NY. The American Museum of Natural History received the human remains from Mr. Kaeser as a gift in 1967. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The individuals have been identified as Native American based on the mode of burial and the presence of items of Native American manufacture that are listed in the field notes but which are not part of the museum’s collection. Based on the literature and the burial context of the human remains in an ossuary mixed with shell midden located on a knoll overlooking Pelham Bay, the human remains are considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 1100). Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and postcontact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of a minimum of 59 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the approximately 568 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; and StockbridgeMunsee Community, Wisconsin. A cultural affiliation determination with the Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma was made prior to the tribe’s change in status. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Nell Murphy, Director of VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:15 Dec 28, 2006 Jkt 211001 Cultural Resources, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024– 5192,telephone (212) 769–5837, before January 29, 2007. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; and Stockbridge-Munsee Community, Wisconsin may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The American Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; and StockbridgeMunsee Community, Wisconsin that this notice has been published. Dated: November 24, 2006. Sherry Hutt, Manager National NAGPRA Program [FR Doc. E6–22343 Filed 12–28–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon, and in the control of the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR, that meet the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary objects’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Between 1948 and 1986, the Old Town Umatilla Townsite (35 UM 1/35 UM 35) underwent various and extensive excavations by multiple entities. Since 1976, the human remains and funerary objects have undergone multiple re-interments and repatriations to the Confederated Tribes of the PO 00000 Frm 00067 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 78461 Umatilla Reservation, Oregon. In 2005, a bag was located in collections labeled as being removed from the Old Town Umatilla Townsite cemetery area, Umatilla County, OR. The 19 unassociated funerary objects are 1 harpoon point, 1 utilized flake, 1 bone awl, 5 projectile points, 1 projectile point fragment, 1 knife, 1 knife fragment, 1 metal rod, 1 pounding stone, 2 uniface choppers, 1 flake, 1 fishbone, 1 charcoal, and 1 shell. The human remains with which the cultural items were originally associated were previously published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register on April 25, 2003, (FR Doc 03– 10029, pages 20406–20407), and were physically repatriated to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon on June 13, 2003. Since the human remains are no longer in the control of the Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, the cultural items in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under NAGPRA. On February 21, 2006 the tribe submitted a claim to the Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District for the newly discovered unassociated funerary items. The Old Town Umatilla site was first occupied in 470 B.C. and is considered to be a prehistoric and historic Umatilla village. The site served as a major winter village of the Umatilla Indians during late prehistoric times, and includes a cemetery that dates from approximately 500 B.C. to A.D. 1700. The site lies within the traditional lands of the present-day Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon. Officials of the Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the 19 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. Officials of the Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Mr. Robert Willis, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, P.O. Box 2946, E:\FR\FM\29DEN1.SGM 29DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 71, Number 250 (Friday, December 29, 2006)]
[Notices]
[Pages 78459-78461]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E6-22343]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural 
History, New York, NY

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves

[[Page 78460]]

Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, 
New York, NY. The human remains and associated funerary objects were 
collected from Bronx County, Kings County, New York County, Queens 
County, and Westchester County, NY.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by American 
Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of 
Indians, Oklahoma (now part of the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma); and 
Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin.
    In 1898, human remains representing a minimum of seven individuals 
were collected by Raymond M. Harrington from Croton Neck, Croton-on-
Hudson, Westchester County, NY. In 1899, the human remains were 
acquired by the museum as a gift from William R. Warren. No known 
individuals were identified. The 20 associated funerary objects are 2 
oyster shells, 14 paintstone fragments, 3 chert pebbles, and 1 clay 
smoking pipe, which dates to the late 17th or early 18th century and is 
apparently of British manufacture.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
the presence of items of Native American manufacture. Flexed burials 
and the relative scarcity of funerary objects are consistent with Late 
Woodland period burial practices. Geographic location is consistent 
with the traditional and postcontact territory of the ``Kitchawonck,'' 
a Munsee Delaware Indian group.
    In 1899, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals 
were collected by M. Raymond Harrington from the south shore of Le Roy 
Bay, Pelham Bay Park, Bronx County, NY, during an expedition sponsored 
by the American Museum of Natural History. No known individuals were 
identified. The 14 associated funerary objects are 4 shell pieces, 5 
stone chips, 2 pottery sherds, 1 stone scraper, 1 mica ornament, and 1 
piece of elk bone.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
the presence of a large Native American habitation site and the 
presence of items of Native American manufacture. The human remains 
recovered from the Le Roy Bay site are considered to date to the Late 
Woodland period (after A.D. 1100). Geographic location is consistent 
with the traditional and post-contact territory of the Munsee Delaware 
Indian groups.
    In 1899, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were collected by M. Raymond Harrington from a shell-filled pit on the 
Ryder property, Avenue U vicinity, Marine Park, Kings County, NY, 
during an American Museum of Natural History expedition. The American 
Museum of Natural History acquired the human remains and associated 
funerary objects later that same year as part of this expedition. No 
known individual was identified. The approximately 192 associated 
funerary objects are 1 pipe bowl, 10 shells, 2 bone tools, 10 pottery 
fragments, 12 stone chips, 1 piece of crab claw, 6 turtle shell 
fragments, and a minimum of 150 animal bones.
    The individual has been identified as Native American based on the 
mode of burial and the presence of items of Native American 
manufacture. Based on the literature and the burial context, the human 
remains are considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 
1100). Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and 
postcontact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups.
    Possibly in 1900, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were collected by M. Raymond Harrington, from a camp burial 
site at Avenue U and Ryder's Pond, Marine Park, Kings County, NY. The 
museum acquired the human remains in 1900 as a gift from Mr. Putnam, 
who supported Mr. Harrington's expeditions. No known individual was 
identified. The 111 associated funerary objects are 1 pipe stem; 2 
sinkers; 32 animal, bird, fish, and turtle bones; 5 stone tools; 1 bone 
tool; and 70 hickory shells and charcoal fragments.
    The individual has been identified as Native American based on 
presence of a Native American occupation site and the presence of items 
of Native American manufacture. Based on the literature and the burial 
context, the human remains are considered to date to the Late Woodland 
period (after A.D. 1100). Geographic location is consistent with the 
traditional and postcontact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian 
groups.
    In 1907, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were collected by Reginald P. Bolton and W.L. Calver from a shell pit 
in Corbet's Garden, 160 feet west of the west side of Cooper Street, 
220 feet south of Hawthorne Street, Inwood, New York County, NY. The 
American Museum of Natural History purchased the human remains and 
associated funerary objects from Mr. Bolton in 1910. No known 
individual was identified. The 194 associated funerary objects are 77 
shell fragments, 32 pottery fragments, and 85 sturgeon scale fragments.
    The individual has been identified as Native American based on the 
mode of burial and the presence of items of Native American 
manufacture. Based on the literature and the burial context, the human 
remains are considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 
1100). Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and 
postcontact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups.
    In 1907 and 1908, human remains representing a minimum of 14 
individuals were collected by Reginald P. Bolton and W.L. Carver from 
Seaman Avenue, Inwood, New York County, NY. The human remains were 
purchased by the museum in 1910. No known individuals were identified. 
The 35 associated funerary objects are 32 oyster shells, 1 stone, 1 
pottery fragment, and 1 stone point.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
the presence of a native shell refuse heap and the presence of items of 
Native American manufacture. The site from which the human remains were 
collected has been identified as a Late Woodland to early contact 
period site. Based on the literature, the burial context of the human 
remains, and the lack of associated items from the Historic period, the 
human remains are considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after 
A.D. 1100). Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and 
postcontact territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups.
    In 1939, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were collected by Ralph Solecki from a shell pit at the head of Hawtree 
Creek, an arm of Jamaica Bay, Aquaduct, Queens County, NY. The American 
Museum of Natural History received the human remains from Mr. Solecki 
as a gift in 1947. No known individuals were identified. The two 
associated funerary objects are one oyster shell and one pottery 
fragment.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
the mode of burial and the presence of an item of

[[Page 78461]]

Native American manufacture. Based on the literature and the burial 
context of the human remains, the human remains are considered to date 
to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 1100). Geographic location is 
consistent with the traditional and postcontact territory of the Munsee 
Delaware Indian groups.
    In the late 1950s, human remains representing a minimum of 29 
individuals were collected by Mr. E.J. Kaeser from an ossuary at the 
Archery Range site, Pelham Bay Park, Bronx County, NY. The American 
Museum of Natural History received the human remains from Mr. Kaeser as 
a gift in 1967. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    The individuals have been identified as Native American based on 
the mode of burial and the presence of items of Native American 
manufacture that are listed in the field notes but which are not part 
of the museum's collection. Based on the literature and the burial 
context of the human remains in an ossuary mixed with shell midden 
located on a knoll overlooking Pelham Bay, the human remains are 
considered to date to the Late Woodland period (after A.D. 1100). 
Geographic location is consistent with the traditional and postcontact 
territory of the Munsee Delaware Indian groups.
    Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of a minimum of 59 individuals of 
Native American ancestry. Officials of the American Museum of Natural 
History have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), 
the approximately 568 objects described above are reasonably believed 
to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time 
of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, 
officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared 
group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Cherokee 
Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; and Stockbridge-Munsee 
Community, Wisconsin. A cultural affiliation determination with the 
Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma was made prior to the tribe's 
change in status.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Nell Murphy, Director of Cultural Resources, 
American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, 
New York, NY 10024-5192,telephone (212) 769-5837, before January 29, 
2007. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects 
to the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; and 
Stockbridge-Munsee Community, Wisconsin may proceed after that date if 
no additional claimants come forward.
    The American Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying 
the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; and 
Stockbridge-Munsee Community, Wisconsin that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: November 24, 2006.
Sherry Hutt, Manager
National NAGPRA Program
[FR Doc. E6-22343 Filed 12-28-06; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S