Long-Term Experimental Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam and Other Associated Management Activities, 74556-74558 [E6-20756]

Download as PDF jlentini on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES 74556 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 238 / Tuesday, December 12, 2006 / Notices regulations as the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary) may prescribe, including all necessary access and exit rights. 3. A reversionary interest as further defined in the above terms, covenants and conditions. When patented, title to the land will be subject to: 1. Valid existing rights of record, including, but not limited to those documented on the BLM public land records at the time of sale, and, 2. By accepting the patent, Clark County, subject to the limitations of law and to the extent allowed by law, shall be responsible for the acts or omissions of its officers, directors and employees in connection with the use or occupancy of the patented real property. Successors-in-interests of the patented real property, except Clark County, shall indemnify, defend, and hold the United States and Clark County harmless from any costs, damages, claims, causes of action, penalties, fines, liabilities, and judgments of any kind or nature arising from the past, present, and future acts or omissions of the successors-ininterest, excluding Clark County, or its employees, agents, contractors, or lessees, or any third-party, arising out of or in connection with the successor-ininterests, excluding Clark County, use, occupancy, or operations on the patented real property. This indemnification and hold harmless agreement includes, but is not limited to, acts and omissions of the successorin-interests, excluding Clark County, and its employees, agents, contractors, or lessees, or any third party, arising out of or in connection with the use and/or occupancy of the patented real property which has already resulted or does hereafter result in: (1) Violations of Federal, State, and local laws and regulations that are now or may in the future become, applicable to the real property; (2) Judgments, claims or demands of any kind assessed against the United States or Clark County; (3) Costs, expenses, or damages of any kind incurred by the United States or Clark County; (4) Other releases or threatened releases of solid or hazardous waste(s) and/or hazardous substances(s), as defined by Federal or State environmental laws, off, on, into or under land, property and other interests of the United States or Clark County; (5) Other activities by which solids or hazardous substances or wastes, as defined by Federal and State environmental laws are generated, released, stored, used or otherwise disposed of on the patented real property, and any cleanup response, remedial action or other actions related VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:00 Dec 11, 2006 Jkt 211001 in any manner to said solid or hazardous substances or wastes; or (6) Natural resource damages as defined by Federal and State law. This covenant shall be construed as running with the parcels of land patented or otherwise conveyed by the United States, and may be enforced against successors-ininterest, excluding Clark County, by the United States or Clark County in a court of competent jurisdiction. No warranty of any kind, express or implied is given or will be given by the United States as to the title, physical condition or potential uses of the land proposed for sale. However, to the extent required by law, such land is subject to the requirements of Section 120(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 9620(h)). Publication of this notice in the Federal Register temporarily segregates the above described land from appropriation under the public land laws, including the mining laws. The segregation effect of this notice will terminate in the future as specified in 43 CFR 2711.1–3(c)). The above described land was previously segregated from mineral entry under BLM case file number N–66364, with record notation as of October 19, 1998. This previous segregation will terminate upon publication of this notice in the Federal Register. Detailed information concerning the proposed sale, including an environmental studies and documents, approved appraisal report and supporting documents, is available for review at the BLM Las Vegas Field Office at the address above. Interested parties may submit written comments regarding the sale, including the EA, to the address above. No facsimiles, emails, or telephone calls will be considered as validly submitted comments. The Field Manager, BLM, Las Vegas Field Office, will review the comments of all interested parties concerning the sale. To be considered, comments must be received at the BLM Las Vegas Field Office on or before the date stated above in this notice for that purpose. Comments received during this process, including respondent’s name, address, and other contact information will be available for public review. Individual respondents may request confidentiality. If you wish to request that BLM consider withholding your name, address, and other contact information from public review or disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act, you must state this prominently at the beginning of your comment. The BLM will honor requests PO 00000 Frm 00072 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 for confidentiality on a case-by-case basis to the extent allowed by law. The BLM will make available for public review, in their entirety, all comments submitted by businesses or organizations, including comments by individuals in their capacity as an official or representative of a business or organization. Any adverse comments will be reviewed by the BLM, Nevada State Director who may sustain, vacate, or modify this realty action. In the absence of any adverse comments, the decision will become effective on February 12, 2007. The lands will not be offered for sale until after the decision becomes effective. (Authority: 43 CFR 2711.1–2(a)). Dated: November 24, 2006. Sharon DiPinto, Assistant Field Manager, Division of Lands, Las Vegas, NV. [FR Doc. E6–21041 Filed 12–11–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–HC–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Reclamation Long-Term Experimental Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam and Other Associated Management Activities Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) and notice to solicit comments and hold additional public scoping meetings on the adoption of a Long-Term Experimental Plan for the operation of Glen Canyon Dam and other associated management activities under the authority of the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary). AGENCY: SUMMARY: In a Federal Register notice published on November 6, 2006 (71 FR 64982–64983), and pursuant to § 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, and 40 CFR 1508.22, the Department of the Interior (Department), acting through the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), provided notice that the Department intends to prepare an EIS and conduct public scoping meetings for the adoption of a Long-Term Experimental Plan for the operation of Glen Canyon Dam and other associated management activities. This Federal Register notice, prepared pursuant to 40 CFR 1508.22, provides information on additional public scoping meetings, the purpose and need for the proposed action, and additional E:\FR\FM\12DEN1.SGM 12DEN1 jlentini on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 238 / Tuesday, December 12, 2006 / Notices background on the Long-Term Experimental Plan. The purpose of the Long-Term Experimental Plan is to increase understanding of the ecosystem downstream from Glen Canyon Dam and to improve and protect important downstream resources. The NEPA process would evaluate the implications and impacts of each of the alternatives on all of the purposes and benefits of Glen Canyon Dam as well as on downstream resources. The proposed plan would implement a structured, long-term program of experimentation (including dam operations, modifications to Glen Canyon Dam intake structures, and other non-flow management actions, such as removal of non-native fish species) and monitoring in the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam. The proposed Long-Term Experimental Plan is intended to ensure a continued, structured application of adaptive management in such a manner as to protect, mitigate adverse impacts to, and improve the values for which Grand Canyon National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area were established, including, but not limited to natural and cultural resources and visitor use, consistent with applicable Federal law. The Long-Term Experimental Plan will build on a decade of scientific experimentation and monitoring that has taken place as part of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program, and will build on the knowledge gained by experiments, operations, and management actions taken under the program. Accordingly, Reclamation intends to tier from earlier NEPA compliance documents prepared as part of the Department’s Glen Canyon Adaptive Management Program efforts, see 40 CFR 1500.4(i), 1502.20, and 1508.20(b), such as the 2002 Environmental Assessment prepared on adaptive management experimental actions at Glen Canyon Dam (Proposed Experimental Releases from Glen Canyon Dam and Removal of NonNative Fish). Dates and Addresses: Two additional public scoping meetings will be held to solicit comments on the scope of the Long-Term Experimental Plan and the issues and alternatives that should be analyzed. The meetings will serve to expand upon the input received from the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program meetings and the recommendations of the Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG), a federal advisory committee. Oral and written comments will be accepted at VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:00 Dec 11, 2006 Jkt 211001 the meetings to be held at the following locations: • Thursday, January 4, 2007—6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Embassy Suites Phoenix Airport at 44th Street, 1515 North 44th Street, Cholla Room, Phoenix, Arizona. • Friday, January 5, 2007—6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Hilton Salt Lake City Center, 255 South West Temple, Salon 1, Salt Lake City, Utah. Written comments on the proposed development of the Long-Term Experimental Plan may be sent by close of business on Wednesday, February 28, 2007, to: Regional Director, Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region, Attention: UC–402, 125 South State Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 84318–1147, faxogram at (801) 524–3858, or e-mail at GCDExpPlan@uc.usbr.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dennis Kubly, Bureau of Reclamation, telephone (801) 524–3715; faxogram (801) 524–3858; e-mail at GCDExpPlan@uc.usbr.gov. If special assistance is required regarding accommodations for attendance at either of the public meetings, please contact Jayne Kelleher at (801) 524–3680, faxogram at (801) 524–3858, or e-mail at jkelleher@uc.usbr.gov no less than 5 working days prior to the applicable meeting(s). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Glen Canyon Dam was authorized by the Colorado River Storage Project Act (CRSPA) of 1956 and completed by Reclamation in 1963. Below Glen Canyon Dam, the Colorado River flows for 15 miles through the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area which is managed by the National Park Service. Fifteen miles below Glen Canyon Dam, Lees Ferry, Arizona, marks the beginning of Marble Canyon and the northern boundary of Grand Canyon National Park. The primary purpose and major function of Glen Canyon Dam is water conservation and storage. The dam is specifically managed to regulate releases of water from the Upper Colorado River Basin to the Lower Colorado River Basin to satisfy provisions of the 1922 Colorado River Compact and subsequent water delivery commitments, and thereby allow states within the Upper Basin to deplete water from the watershed upstream of Glen Canyon Dam and utilize their apportionments of Colorado River water. In addition to the primary purpose of water delivery, another function of Glen Canyon Dam is to generate hydroelectric power. Between the dam’s completion in 1963 and 1990, the dam’s daily operations were primarily undertaken to maximize generation of hydroelectric PO 00000 Frm 00073 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 74557 power in accordance with Section 7 of the CRSPA, which requires production of the greatest practicable amount of power. Over time, concerns arose with respect to the operation of Glen Canyon Dam, including effects of operations on species listed pursuant to the Endangered Species Act. In 1992, Congress passed and the President signed into law, the Grand Canyon Protection Act which addresses potential impacts of dam operations on downstream resources in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon National Park. The Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992 required the Secretary to complete an environmental impact statement evaluating alternative operating criteria, consistent with existing law, that would determine how Glen Canyon Dam would be operated to both meet the purposes for which the dam was authorized and meet the goals for protection of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon National Park. The final environmental impact statement was completed in March 1995. The Preferred Alternative (Modified Low Fluctuating Flow Alternative) was selected as the best means to operate Glen Canyon Dam in a Record of Decision (ROD) issued on October 9, 1996. In 1997 the Secretary adopted operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam (62 FR 9447–9448) as required by Section 1804(c) of the Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992. Additionally, the Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992 requires the Secretary to undertake research and monitoring to determine if revised dam operations were achieving the resource protection objectives of the final EIS and ROD. These provisions of the Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992 were incorporated into the 1996 ROD and led to the establishment of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program, administered by Reclamation, and of the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The Adaptive Management Program includes a federal advisory committee known as the AMWG, a Technical Work Group, a monitoring and research center administered by the USGS, and independent review panels. The Technical Work Group is a subcommittee of the AMWG and provides technical advice and recommendations to the AMWG. The AMWG makes recommendations to the Secretary concerning Glen Canyon Dam operations and other management actions to protect resources downstream from Glen Canyon Dam consistent with E:\FR\FM\12DEN1.SGM 12DEN1 74558 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 238 / Tuesday, December 12, 2006 / Notices jlentini on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES the Grand Canyon Protection Act and other applicable provisions of Federal law. To improve scientific understanding of the downstream ecosystem, periodic experimental releases from Glen Canyon Dam were conducted in water years 1996 through 2006. Non-flow actions were also conducted, including removal of non-native fish and translocation of the endangered Kanab ambersnail and humpback chub. Specific experimental actions included: • 1996 test of a Beach Habitat Building Flow (BHBF) at 45,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) and translocation of endangered Kanab ambersnail. • 2000 test of Low Steady Summer Flows at 8,000 cfs. • 2003—2005 block of experimental actions which included: Æ Translocation of endangered humpback chub above Chute Falls. Æ Winter fluctuating fish suppression releases (5,000 to 20,000 cfs). Æ Mechanical removal of non-native fish near the confluence of the Little Colorado River to benefit the humpback chub. Æ Fall constrained releases to test the conservation of sediment (6,500 to 9,000 cfs). Æ 2004 test of a BHBF at 42,000 cfs immediately following Paria River sediment inputs. In addition, drought-induced reductions in Lake Powell elevations caused an increase in dam release temperatures during 2003 to 2005. Considerable monitoring and research on endangered fish, sediment conservation, and other resources in the Grand Canyon were conducted in concert with these actions. Among other documents related to adaptive management experimentation, two Environmental Assessments and Findings of No Significant Impacts were prepared: Proposed Experimental Releases from Glen Canyon Dam and Removal of Non-Native Fish (2002) and Proposed Experimental Actions for Water Years 2005–2006—Colorado River, Arizona, in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon National Park (2004). These two documents can be found at the following Internet location: http:// www.usbr.gov/uc/rm/gcdltep/ index.html. Proposed Action The proposed action is to develop and adopt a Long-Term Experimental Plan that will implement a structured, longterm program of experimentation (including dam operations, modifications to Glen Canyon Dam intake structures, and other non-flow VerDate Aug<31>2005 18:00 Dec 11, 2006 Jkt 211001 management actions, such as removal of non-native fish species) in the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam. Purpose and Need for Action The purpose of the proposed action is to increase scientific understanding of the ecosystem downstream from Glen Canyon Dam and to improve and protect important downstream resources. Specific hypotheses to be addressed include the effect of dam release temperatures; ramp rates; non-native control; and the timing, duration, and magnitude of BHBF releases. Adoption of a Long-Term Experimental Plan is needed to ensure a continued, structured application of adaptive management in such a manner as to protect, mitigate adverse impacts to, and improve the values for which Grand Canyon National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area were established, including, but not limited to natural and cultural resources and visitor use, consistent with applicable Federal law. Adoption of a Long-Term Experimental Plan will assist scientists, policy makers, and resource managers to better understand resource management options, tradeoffs and consequences, and assist in the long-term operations of Glen Canyon Dam. Scoping The range of alternatives for the proposed action will be developed following recommendations provided by the AMWG and through information received from upcoming public scoping meetings. In addition, Reclamation will utilize information developed through prior meetings of the AMWG, Technical Work Group, and Science Planning Group as relevant information for the purposes of scoping the upcoming NEPA process and to develop the appropriate scope of analysis pursuant to 40 CFR 1508.25. Public Disclosure It is our practice to make comments, including names, home addresses, home telephone numbers, and e-mail addresses of respondents, available for public review. Individual respondents may request that we withhold their names and/or home addresses, etc., but if you wish us to consider withholding this information you must state this prominently at the beginning of your comments. In addition, you must present a rationale for withholding this information. This rationale must demonstrate that disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of privacy. Unsupported assertions will not meet this burden. In the absence of exceptional, PO 00000 Frm 00074 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 documentable circumstances, this information will be released. We will always make submissions from organizations or businesses, and from individuals identifying themselves as representatives or officials of organizations or businesses, available for public inspection in their entirety. Dated: November 17, 2006. Rick L. Gold, Regional Director—UC Region, Bureau of Reclamation. [FR Doc. E6–20756 Filed 12–11–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–MN–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731–TA–961 (Final) (Remand)] Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Trinidad and Tobago; Notice and Scheduling of Remand Proceeding U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The United States International Trade Commission (Commission) gives notice of the courtordered remand of its final antidumping duty investigation, Investigation No. 731–TA–961 (Final) (Remand). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jonathan J. Engler, Esq., Office of the General Counsel, telephone (202) 205– 3112, or Mary Messer, Office of Investigations, telephone (202) 205– 3193, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street, SW., Washington, DC 20436. Hearingimpaired individuals are advised that information on this matter can be obtained by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal on (202) 205–1810. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its Internet server (http://www.usitc.gov). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Reopening the Record In October 2002, the Commission made a final affirmative determination in the referenced investigation. 67 FR 66662 (Nov. 1, 2002). Respondent appealed the determination to the U.S. Court of International Trade (CIT), which affirmed the Commission’s determination. Caribbean Ispat Ltd. v. United States, Slip Op. 05–37 (March 22, 2005). Respondent appealed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which vacated and remanded the Commission’s determination. Caribbean Ispat Ltd. v. United States, E:\FR\FM\12DEN1.SGM 12DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 71, Number 238 (Tuesday, December 12, 2006)]
[Notices]
[Pages 74556-74558]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E6-20756]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Bureau of Reclamation


Long-Term Experimental Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam 
and Other Associated Management Activities

AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement 
(EIS) and notice to solicit comments and hold additional public scoping 
meetings on the adoption of a Long-Term Experimental Plan for the 
operation of Glen Canyon Dam and other associated management activities 
under the authority of the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In a Federal Register notice published on November 6, 2006 (71 
FR 64982-64983), and pursuant to Sec.  102(2)(C) of the National 
Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, and 40 CFR 
1508.22, the Department of the Interior (Department), acting through 
the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), provided notice that the 
Department intends to prepare an EIS and conduct public scoping 
meetings for the adoption of a Long-Term Experimental Plan for the 
operation of Glen Canyon Dam and other associated management 
activities. This Federal Register notice, prepared pursuant to 40 CFR 
1508.22, provides information on additional public scoping meetings, 
the purpose and need for the proposed action, and additional

[[Page 74557]]

background on the Long-Term Experimental Plan.
    The purpose of the Long-Term Experimental Plan is to increase 
understanding of the ecosystem downstream from Glen Canyon Dam and to 
improve and protect important downstream resources. The NEPA process 
would evaluate the implications and impacts of each of the alternatives 
on all of the purposes and benefits of Glen Canyon Dam as well as on 
downstream resources. The proposed plan would implement a structured, 
long-term program of experimentation (including dam operations, 
modifications to Glen Canyon Dam intake structures, and other non-flow 
management actions, such as removal of non-native fish species) and 
monitoring in the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam.
    The proposed Long-Term Experimental Plan is intended to ensure a 
continued, structured application of adaptive management in such a 
manner as to protect, mitigate adverse impacts to, and improve the 
values for which Grand Canyon National Park and Glen Canyon National 
Recreation Area were established, including, but not limited to natural 
and cultural resources and visitor use, consistent with applicable 
Federal law.
    The Long-Term Experimental Plan will build on a decade of 
scientific experimentation and monitoring that has taken place as part 
of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program, and will build on 
the knowledge gained by experiments, operations, and management actions 
taken under the program. Accordingly, Reclamation intends to tier from 
earlier NEPA compliance documents prepared as part of the Department's 
Glen Canyon Adaptive Management Program efforts, see 40 CFR 1500.4(i), 
1502.20, and 1508.20(b), such as the 2002 Environmental Assessment 
prepared on adaptive management experimental actions at Glen Canyon Dam 
(Proposed Experimental Releases from Glen Canyon Dam and Removal of 
Non-Native Fish).
    Dates and Addresses: Two additional public scoping meetings will be 
held to solicit comments on the scope of the Long-Term Experimental 
Plan and the issues and alternatives that should be analyzed. The 
meetings will serve to expand upon the input received from the Glen 
Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program meetings and the recommendations 
of the Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG), a federal advisory 
committee. Oral and written comments will be accepted at the meetings 
to be held at the following locations:
     Thursday, January 4, 2007--6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Embassy 
Suites Phoenix Airport at 44th Street, 1515 North 44th Street, Cholla 
Room, Phoenix, Arizona.
     Friday, January 5, 2007--6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Hilton Salt 
Lake City Center, 255 South West Temple, Salon 1, Salt Lake City, Utah.
    Written comments on the proposed development of the Long-Term 
Experimental Plan may be sent by close of business on Wednesday, 
February 28, 2007, to: Regional Director, Bureau of Reclamation, Upper 
Colorado Region, Attention: UC-402, 125 South State Street, Salt Lake 
City, Utah 84318-1147, faxogram at (801) 524-3858, or e-mail at 
GCDExpPlan@uc.usbr.gov.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dennis Kubly, Bureau of Reclamation, 
telephone (801) 524-3715; faxogram (801) 524-3858; e-mail at 
GCDExpPlan@uc.usbr.gov. If special assistance is required regarding 
accommodations for attendance at either of the public meetings, please 
contact Jayne Kelleher at (801) 524-3680, faxogram at (801) 524-3858, 
or e-mail at jkelleher@uc.usbr.gov no less than 5 working days prior to 
the applicable meeting(s).

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Glen Canyon Dam was authorized by the 
Colorado River Storage Project Act (CRSPA) of 1956 and completed by 
Reclamation in 1963. Below Glen Canyon Dam, the Colorado River flows 
for 15 miles through the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area which is 
managed by the National Park Service. Fifteen miles below Glen Canyon 
Dam, Lees Ferry, Arizona, marks the beginning of Marble Canyon and the 
northern boundary of Grand Canyon National Park.
    The primary purpose and major function of Glen Canyon Dam is water 
conservation and storage. The dam is specifically managed to regulate 
releases of water from the Upper Colorado River Basin to the Lower 
Colorado River Basin to satisfy provisions of the 1922 Colorado River 
Compact and subsequent water delivery commitments, and thereby allow 
states within the Upper Basin to deplete water from the watershed 
upstream of Glen Canyon Dam and utilize their apportionments of 
Colorado River water.
    In addition to the primary purpose of water delivery, another 
function of Glen Canyon Dam is to generate hydroelectric power. Between 
the dam's completion in 1963 and 1990, the dam's daily operations were 
primarily undertaken to maximize generation of hydroelectric power in 
accordance with Section 7 of the CRSPA, which requires production of 
the greatest practicable amount of power.
    Over time, concerns arose with respect to the operation of Glen 
Canyon Dam, including effects of operations on species listed pursuant 
to the Endangered Species Act. In 1992, Congress passed and the 
President signed into law, the Grand Canyon Protection Act which 
addresses potential impacts of dam operations on downstream resources 
in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon National Park.
    The Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992 required the Secretary to 
complete an environmental impact statement evaluating alternative 
operating criteria, consistent with existing law, that would determine 
how Glen Canyon Dam would be operated to both meet the purposes for 
which the dam was authorized and meet the goals for protection of Glen 
Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon National Park. The 
final environmental impact statement was completed in March 1995. The 
Preferred Alternative (Modified Low Fluctuating Flow Alternative) was 
selected as the best means to operate Glen Canyon Dam in a Record of 
Decision (ROD) issued on October 9, 1996. In 1997 the Secretary adopted 
operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam (62 FR 9447-9448) as required by 
Section 1804(c) of the Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992.
    Additionally, the Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992 requires the 
Secretary to undertake research and monitoring to determine if revised 
dam operations were achieving the resource protection objectives of the 
final EIS and ROD. These provisions of the Grand Canyon Protection Act 
of 1992 were incorporated into the 1996 ROD and led to the 
establishment of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program, 
administered by Reclamation, and of the Grand Canyon Monitoring and 
Research Center within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).
    The Adaptive Management Program includes a federal advisory 
committee known as the AMWG, a Technical Work Group, a monitoring and 
research center administered by the USGS, and independent review 
panels. The Technical Work Group is a subcommittee of the AMWG and 
provides technical advice and recommendations to the AMWG. The AMWG 
makes recommendations to the Secretary concerning Glen Canyon Dam 
operations and other management actions to protect resources downstream 
from Glen Canyon Dam consistent with

[[Page 74558]]

the Grand Canyon Protection Act and other applicable provisions of 
Federal law.
    To improve scientific understanding of the downstream ecosystem, 
periodic experimental releases from Glen Canyon Dam were conducted in 
water years 1996 through 2006. Non-flow actions were also conducted, 
including removal of non-native fish and translocation of the 
endangered Kanab ambersnail and humpback chub. Specific experimental 
actions included:
     1996 test of a Beach Habitat Building Flow (BHBF) at 
45,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) and translocation of endangered 
Kanab ambersnail.
     2000 test of Low Steady Summer Flows at 8,000 cfs.
     2003--2005 block of experimental actions which included:
    [cir] Translocation of endangered humpback chub above Chute Falls.
    [cir] Winter fluctuating fish suppression releases (5,000 to 20,000 
cfs).
    [cir] Mechanical removal of non-native fish near the confluence of 
the Little Colorado River to benefit the humpback chub.
    [cir] Fall constrained releases to test the conservation of 
sediment (6,500 to 9,000 cfs).
    [cir] 2004 test of a BHBF at 42,000 cfs immediately following Paria 
River sediment inputs.
    In addition, drought-induced reductions in Lake Powell elevations 
caused an increase in dam release temperatures during 2003 to 2005. 
Considerable monitoring and research on endangered fish, sediment 
conservation, and other resources in the Grand Canyon were conducted in 
concert with these actions. Among other documents related to adaptive 
management experimentation, two Environmental Assessments and Findings 
of No Significant Impacts were prepared: Proposed Experimental Releases 
from Glen Canyon Dam and Removal of Non-Native Fish (2002) and Proposed 
Experimental Actions for Water Years 2005-2006--Colorado River, 
Arizona, in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon 
National Park (2004). These two documents can be found at the following 
Internet location: http://www.usbr.gov/uc/rm/gcdltep/index.html.

Proposed Action

    The proposed action is to develop and adopt a Long-Term 
Experimental Plan that will implement a structured, long-term program 
of experimentation (including dam operations, modifications to Glen 
Canyon Dam intake structures, and other non-flow management actions, 
such as removal of non-native fish species) in the Colorado River below 
Glen Canyon Dam.

Purpose and Need for Action

    The purpose of the proposed action is to increase scientific 
understanding of the ecosystem downstream from Glen Canyon Dam and to 
improve and protect important downstream resources. Specific hypotheses 
to be addressed include the effect of dam release temperatures; ramp 
rates; non-native control; and the timing, duration, and magnitude of 
BHBF releases. Adoption of a Long-Term Experimental Plan is needed to 
ensure a continued, structured application of adaptive management in 
such a manner as to protect, mitigate adverse impacts to, and improve 
the values for which Grand Canyon National Park and Glen Canyon 
National Recreation Area were established, including, but not limited 
to natural and cultural resources and visitor use, consistent with 
applicable Federal law. Adoption of a Long-Term Experimental Plan will 
assist scientists, policy makers, and resource managers to better 
understand resource management options, tradeoffs and consequences, and 
assist in the long-term operations of Glen Canyon Dam.

Scoping

    The range of alternatives for the proposed action will be developed 
following recommendations provided by the AMWG and through information 
received from upcoming public scoping meetings. In addition, 
Reclamation will utilize information developed through prior meetings 
of the AMWG, Technical Work Group, and Science Planning Group as 
relevant information for the purposes of scoping the upcoming NEPA 
process and to develop the appropriate scope of analysis pursuant to 40 
CFR 1508.25.

Public Disclosure

    It is our practice to make comments, including names, home 
addresses, home telephone numbers, and e-mail addresses of respondents, 
available for public review. Individual respondents may request that we 
withhold their names and/or home addresses, etc., but if you wish us to 
consider withholding this information you must state this prominently 
at the beginning of your comments. In addition, you must present a 
rationale for withholding this information. This rationale must 
demonstrate that disclosure would constitute a clearly unwarranted 
invasion of privacy. Unsupported assertions will not meet this burden. 
In the absence of exceptional, documentable circumstances, this 
information will be released. We will always make submissions from 
organizations or businesses, and from individuals identifying 
themselves as representatives or officials of organizations or 
businesses, available for public inspection in their entirety.

    Dated: November 17, 2006.
Rick L. Gold,
Regional Director--UC Region, Bureau of Reclamation.
[FR Doc. E6-20756 Filed 12-11-06; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-MN-P