Recovery Plan for the Newcomb's Snail Erinna newcombi, 54682-54683 [E6-15438]

Download as PDF cprice-sewell on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES 54682 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 180 / Monday, September 18, 2006 / Notices guide the recovery effort, the Service is working to prepare recovery plans for most of the listed species native to the United States. Recovery plans describe actions considered necessary for the conservation of the species, establish criteria for downlisting or delisting listed species, and estimate time and cost for implementing the recovery measures needed. The Endangered Species Act (ESA) requires the development of recovery plans for listed species unless such a plan would not promote the conservation of a particular species. Section 4(f) of the ESA requires that public notice and an opportunity for public review and comment be provided during recovery plan development. The Draft Recovery Plan for Phlox hirsuta (Yreka Phlox) was available for public comment from July 19, 2004, through October 18, 2004 (69 FR 43009). Information presented during the public comment period has been considered in the preparation of this final recovery plan, and is summarized in Appendix 8 of the recovery plan. Phlox hirsuta was listed as endangered in 2000 (65 FR 5268). Critical habitat has not been designated for this species. Phlox hirsuta is endemic to serpentine soils, and is known from only five separate locations that are separated by a minimum of 0.55 miles (0.88 kilometers). Distribution of Phlox hirsuta within these occurrences ranges from scattered plants to numerous discrete suboccurrences that are found on lands owned and managed by the City of Yreka, the U.S. Forest Service, California Department of Transportation, industrial timber companies, and private landowners. Phlox hirsuta is threatened by alteration or destruction of habitat resulting from residential development, logging, fire suppression activities, ongoing highway maintenance or construction activities, off-road vehicle use, illegal collection, and vandalism. Other threats include competition with exotic plants, herbicide application, grazing by domestic animals, inadequate existing regulatory mechanisms, and potential extirpation as a result of random events. The objective of this recovery plan is to provide a framework for the recovery of Phlox hirsuta so that protection by the ESA is no longer necessary. This recovery plan establishes criteria necessary to accomplish downlisting and eventually delisting of Phlox hirsuta. The criteria for downlisting to threatened status are that: (1) Four occurrences (two of which must be the China Hill and Soap Creek Ridge occurrences) have secure permanent VerDate Aug<31>2005 16:07 Sep 15, 2006 Jkt 208001 protection (legally-binding arrangements that ensure management for the benefit of Phlox hirsuta in perpetuity), and (2) a Phlox hirsuta seed bank and effective propagation techniques have been established. The criteria for delisting are: (1) The reclassification criteria for downlisting have been met, and (2) two additional occurrences have been located and permanently protected, or 10 years of demographic research and/or quantitative monitoring at four protected occurrences has indicated that plant population size has not declined more than 10 percent at any occurrence (total change between year 0 and year 10). Authority The authority for this action is section 4(f) of the Endangered Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533(f). Dated: July 27, 2006. Steve Thompson, Manager, California/Nevada Operations Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 06–7713 Filed 9–15–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Recovery Plan for the Newcomb’s Snail Erinna newcombi AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of document availability. SUMMARY: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (‘‘we’’) announces the availability of a Recovery Plan for the Newcomb’s snail (Erinna newcombi). This aquatic snail is listed as threatened (65 FR 4162) and is endemic to the Hawaiian Island of Kaua‘i. Copies of the Recovery Plan are available by request from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office, 300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Room 3–122, Box 50088, Honolulu, Hawaii 96850 (phone 808/792–9400); and the Hawaii State Library, 478 S. King Street, Honolulu, Hawaii 96813. An electronic copy of the recovery plan is available on the world wide Web at: http://endangered.fws.gov/ recovery/index.html#plans. ADDRESSES: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lorena Wada, Invertebrate Program Supervisor, at the above Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office address. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00075 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Background Restoring endangered or threatened animals and plants to the point where they are again secure, self-sustaining members of their ecosystems is a primary goal of our endangered species program. The Endangered Species Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.) (Act) requires the development of recovery plans for listed species unless such a plan would not promote the conservation of a particular species. Recovery plans help guide the recovery effort by describing actions considered necessary for the conservation of the species, establishing criteria for downlisting or delisting listed species, and estimating time and cost for implementing the measures needed for recovery. Section 4(f) of the Act requires that public notice and an opportunity for public review and comment be provided during recovery plan development. In fulfillment of this requirement, the Draft Recovery Plan for the Newcomb’s Snail (Erinna newcombi) was available for public comment from March 24, 2004, through May 24, 2004 (69 FR 13868). Information presented during the public comment period has been considered in the preparation of this recovery plan, and is summarized in the appendix to the recovery plan. We will forward substantive comments regarding recovery plan implementation to appropriate Federal or other entities so that they can take these comments into account during the course of implementing recovery actions. Newcomb’s snail is an aquatic snail known to occur at 10 small locations in streams and springs located in 6 watersheds found in the mountainous interior of the Hawaiian Island of Kau1i. Newcomb’s snail is a type of freshwater snail belonging to the lymnaeid family of snails. Adult Newcomb’s snails are approximately 6 millimeters (0.25 inches) long and 3 millimeters (0.12 inches) wide. Three of the six watersheds containing sites where Newcomb’s snails occur are privately owned; the remaining sites are located on State of Hawaii lands. Some of the historical decline of the snail may be attributed to habitat loss and degradation through water diversion and well drilling. In addition, predation by alien species, natural disasters, and habitat alteration are threats that imperil the Newcomb’s snail. Presently, Newcomb’s snail faces an increased likelihood of extinction from naturally occurring events due to the small number of remaining populations and their limited distribution. Significant habitat destruction through reduction or E:\FR\FM\18SEN1.SGM 18SEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 180 / Monday, September 18, 2006 / Notices elimination of stream or spring flow could destroy an entire population of Newcomb’s snail, and natural disasters such as hurricanes or catastrophic landslides could also destroy vital habitat. The objective of this recovery plan is to ensure the long-term conservation, recovery, and eventual delisting of the species. This recovery will be accomplished through a variety of recovery actions including: (1) Conducting research on the population biology and life history of the Newcomb’s snail; (2) analysis and potential prevention of predation and other forms of negative interspecific interactions that may limit or reduce Newcomb’s snail populations; (3) assurance of adequate stream and spring flows to protect known and potential Newcomb’s snail habitat; (4) making recovery of Newcomb’s snail a part of other landscape conservation efforts, such as preservation of the structure and function of upland forests that maintain and regulate surface run-off to streams and act as areas of infiltration for ground water; (5) using initial recovery efforts and research to periodically validate recovery objectives; and (6) providing educational informational opportunities to build public support for conservation. Authority The authority for this action is section 4(f) of the Endangered Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533(f). Dated: May 4, 2006. David J. Wesley, Acting Regional Director, Region 1, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. E6–15438 Filed 9–15–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR [NMNM 46832 and NMNM 46839] Public Land Order No. 7670; Revocation of Secretarial Orders Dated August 17, 1907 and August 27, 1908; New Mexico Interior. Public land order. cprice-sewell on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES ACTION: SUMMARY: This order revokes two Secretarial Orders in their entirety, which withdrew 240 acres of National Forest System land for use as an administrative site known as Station No. 34 or Baca Administrative Site. DATES: Effective Date: September 18, 2006. 14:48 Sep 15, 2006 Jkt 208001 Order By virtue of the authority vested in the Secretary of the Interior by section 204 of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, 43 U.S.C. 1714 (2000), it is ordered as follows: The Secretarial Orders dated August 17, 1907 and August 27, 1908, which withdrew National Forest System land for use as an administrative site known as Station No. 34 or Baca Administrative Site, are hereby revoked in their entirety. Dated: August 30, 2006. R. Thomas Weimer, Assistant Secretary of the Interior. [FR Doc. E6–15414 Filed 9–15–06; 8:45 am] description of the land involved are available from the Bureau of Land Management Oregon/Washington State Office at the address above. Order By virtue of the authority vested in the Secretary of the Interior by Section 204 of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, 43 U.S.C. 1714 (2000), it is ordered as follows: 1. Public Land Order No. 6631 (51 FR 43003, November 28, 1986), which withdrew 24.65 acres of public land from settlement, sale, location and entry under the general land laws, including the United States mining laws, to protect the Bureau of Land Management’s Split Rock Recreation Area, is hereby extended for an additional 20-year period. 2. Public Land Order No. 6631 will expire on November 27, 2026, unless, as a result of a review conducted prior to the expiration date pursuant to section 204(f) of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, 43 U.S.C. 1714(f) (2000), the Secretary determines that the withdrawal shall be extended. BILLING CODE 3410–11–P Dated: August 30, 2006. R. Thomas Weimer, Assistant Secretary of the Interior. [FR Doc. E6–15409 Filed 9–15–06; 8:45 am] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR BILLING CODE 4310–33–P Bureau of Land Management [OR–936–1430–ET; HAG–06–0146; WAOR– 11331] Public Land Order No. 7669; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6631; Washington Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public land order. AGENCY: This order extends Public Land Order No. 6631 for an additional 20-year period. This extension is necessary to continue protection of the Bureau of Land Management’s Split Rock Recreation Area. DATES: Effective Date: November 28, 2006. Bureau of Land Management, Oregon/Washington State Office, P.O. Box 2965, Portland, Oregon 97208. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: William Schurger, Wenatchee Field Office, 509–665–2116, or Charles R. Roy, Bureau of Land Management Oregon/Washington State Office, 503– 808–6189. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Copies of the original order containing the legal ADDRESSES: Bureau of Land Management, VerDate Aug<31>2005 Gilda Fitzpatrick, BLM New Mexico State Office, 1474 Rodeo Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502, 505–438–7597. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Forest Service has determined that the withdrawals are no longer needed and has requested the revocation. The land will not be opened to surface entry or mining until completion of an analysis to determine if any of the land needs special designation. SUMMARY: Bureau of Land Management AGENCY: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: 54683 PO 00000 Frm 00076 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [ID–933–5870–HN, DK–G06–0006] Request for Public Nomination of Qualified Properties for Potential Purchase by the Federal Government in the State of Idaho Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Land Transaction Facilitation Act of 2000, 43 U.S.C. 2303 (FLTFA), this notice provides the public the opportunity to nominate lands within the State of Idaho for possible acquisition by the Federal agencies identified below. Such lands must be (1) inholdings within a federally designated area or (2) lands that are adjacent to federally designated areas and contain exceptional resources. DATES: Nominations may be submitted at any time following the publication of this notice. ADDRESSES: Nominations should be mailed to the attention of the FLTFA Program Manager for the agency listed E:\FR\FM\18SEN1.SGM 18SEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 71, Number 180 (Monday, September 18, 2006)]
[Notices]
[Pages 54682-54683]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E6-15438]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service


Recovery Plan for the Newcomb's Snail Erinna newcombi

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of document availability.

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SUMMARY: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (``we'') announces the 
availability of a Recovery Plan for the Newcomb's snail (Erinna 
newcombi). This aquatic snail is listed as threatened (65 FR 4162) and 
is endemic to the Hawaiian Island of Kaua`i.

ADDRESSES: Copies of the Recovery Plan are available by request from 
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife 
Office, 300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Room 3-122, Box 50088, Honolulu, 
Hawaii 96850 (phone 808/792-9400); and the Hawaii State Library, 478 S. 
King Street, Honolulu, Hawaii 96813. An electronic copy of the recovery 
plan is available on the world wide Web at: http://endangered.fws.gov/
recovery/index.html#plans.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lorena Wada, Invertebrate Program 
Supervisor, at the above Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office 
address.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

    Restoring endangered or threatened animals and plants to the point 
where they are again secure, self-sustaining members of their 
ecosystems is a primary goal of our endangered species program. The 
Endangered Species Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.) (Act) requires the 
development of recovery plans for listed species unless such a plan 
would not promote the conservation of a particular species. Recovery 
plans help guide the recovery effort by describing actions considered 
necessary for the conservation of the species, establishing criteria 
for downlisting or delisting listed species, and estimating time and 
cost for implementing the measures needed for recovery.
    Section 4(f) of the Act requires that public notice and an 
opportunity for public review and comment be provided during recovery 
plan development. In fulfillment of this requirement, the Draft 
Recovery Plan for the Newcomb's Snail (Erinna newcombi) was available 
for public comment from March 24, 2004, through May 24, 2004 (69 FR 
13868). Information presented during the public comment period has been 
considered in the preparation of this recovery plan, and is summarized 
in the appendix to the recovery plan. We will forward substantive 
comments regarding recovery plan implementation to appropriate Federal 
or other entities so that they can take these comments into account 
during the course of implementing recovery actions.
    Newcomb's snail is an aquatic snail known to occur at 10 small 
locations in streams and springs located in 6 watersheds found in the 
mountainous interior of the Hawaiian Island of Kau[revaps]i. Newcomb's 
snail is a type of freshwater snail belonging to the lymnaeid family of 
snails. Adult Newcomb's snails are approximately 6 millimeters (0.25 
inches) long and 3 millimeters (0.12 inches) wide. Three of the six 
watersheds containing sites where Newcomb's snails occur are privately 
owned; the remaining sites are located on State of Hawaii lands.
    Some of the historical decline of the snail may be attributed to 
habitat loss and degradation through water diversion and well drilling. 
In addition, predation by alien species, natural disasters, and habitat 
alteration are threats that imperil the Newcomb's snail. Presently, 
Newcomb's snail faces an increased likelihood of extinction from 
naturally occurring events due to the small number of remaining 
populations and their limited distribution. Significant habitat 
destruction through reduction or

[[Page 54683]]

elimination of stream or spring flow could destroy an entire population 
of Newcomb's snail, and natural disasters such as hurricanes or 
catastrophic landslides could also destroy vital habitat.
    The objective of this recovery plan is to ensure the long-term 
conservation, recovery, and eventual delisting of the species. This 
recovery will be accomplished through a variety of recovery actions 
including: (1) Conducting research on the population biology and life 
history of the Newcomb's snail; (2) analysis and potential prevention 
of predation and other forms of negative interspecific interactions 
that may limit or reduce Newcomb's snail populations; (3) assurance of 
adequate stream and spring flows to protect known and potential 
Newcomb's snail habitat; (4) making recovery of Newcomb's snail a part 
of other landscape conservation efforts, such as preservation of the 
structure and function of upland forests that maintain and regulate 
surface run-off to streams and act as areas of infiltration for ground 
water; (5) using initial recovery efforts and research to periodically 
validate recovery objectives; and (6) providing educational 
informational opportunities to build public support for conservation.

Authority

    The authority for this action is section 4(f) of the Endangered 
Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533(f).

    Dated: May 4, 2006.
David J. Wesley,
Acting Regional Director, Region 1, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
 [FR Doc. E6-15438 Filed 9-15-06; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-55-P