Import Restrictions on Byzantine Ecclesiastical and Ritual Ethnological Material From Cyprus, 51724-51726 [06-7266]

Download as PDF 51724 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 169 / Thursday, August 31, 2006 / Rules and Regulations RS applies to entire entry. A license is required for items controlled by this entry for export or reexport to Iraq or transfer within Iraq for regional stability reasons. The Commerce Country Chart is not designed to determine RS license requirements for this entry. See §§ 742.6 and 746.3 of the EAR for additional information. * * * * * 51. In Supplement No. 1 to part 774 (the Commerce Control List), Category 9—Propulsion Systems, Space Vehicles and Related Equipment, Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) 9A990 is amended by revising the License Requirements section to read as follows: I Supplement No. 1 to Part 774—The Commerce Control List * * * * * Background Category 9—Propulsion Systems, Space Vehicles and Related Equipment * * * * * 9A990 Diesel engines, n.e.s., and tractors and specially designed parts therefore, n.e.s. License Requirements Reason for Control: AT Control(s) Country chart AT applies to entire entry except 9A990.a. AT applies to 9A990.a only * * * * AT Column 1. AT Column 2. * Dated: August 25, 2006. Matthew S. Borman, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Export Administration. [FR Doc. 06–7255 Filed 8–30–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–33–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Bureau of Customs and Border Protection 19 CFR Part 12 [CBP Dec. 06–22] RIN 1505–AB72 Import Restrictions on Byzantine Ecclesiastical and Ritual Ethnological Material From Cyprus Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security; Treasury. ACTION: Final rule. erjones on PROD1PC72 with RULES SUMMARY: This document amends the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations by reflecting that the bilateral agreement VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:29 Aug 30, 2006 Jkt 208001 Since the passage of the Cultural Property Implementation Act (19 U.S.C. 2601 et seq.), import restrictions have been imposed on archaeological and ethnological artifacts of a number of signatory nations. These restrictions have been imposed either as a result of requests for emergency protection received from those nations or pursuant to bilateral agreements between the U.S. and other countries. Pursuant to Article 9 of the 1970 Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property, and Sec. 303(a)(3) of the Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act (19 U.S.C. 2602(a)(3)), a State Party to the 1970 UNESCO Convention, may request that the U.S. Government impose import restrictions on certain categories of archaeological and/or ethnological material the pillage of which, if alleged, jeopardizes the national cultural patrimony. Import Restrictions Imposed on an Emergency Basis DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AGENCY: between Cyprus and the U.S. to impose certain import restrictions on archaeological material from Cyprus has been amended to include import restrictions which had been previously imposed on an emergency basis for certain Byzantine period ecclesiastical and ritual ethnological material. DATES: Effective Date: These regulations are effective on September 4, 2006. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For legal aspects, George F. McCray, Esq., Chief, Intellectual Property Rights and Restricted Merchandise Branch, (202) 572–8710. For operational aspects, Michael Craig, Chief, Other Government Agencies Branch, (202) 344–1684. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On March 4, 1999, and in response to the determination that an emergency condition applies with respect to certain Byzantine ecclesiastical and ritual ethnological material from Cyprus, the U.S. Government made the determination that emergency import restrictions be imposed. Accordingly, on April 12, 1999, the former United States Customs Service published Treasury Decision (T.D.) 99–35 in the Federal Register (64 FR 17529), which amended 19 CFR 12.104g(b) to indicate the imposition of these emergency import restrictions. In that Treasury Decision, a list designating the types of ethnological materials covered by these restrictions for a five-year period, is set forth. PO 00000 Frm 00012 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 These emergency import restrictions were later extended by CBP Dec. 03–25 for an additional three-year period. (See 68 FR 51903, August 29, 2003). These emergency import restrictions are scheduled to expire on September 4, 2006. Import Restrictions Imposed Pursuant to Bilateral Agreement Pursuant to the provisions of the 1970 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Convention, codified into U.S. law as the Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act (Pub. L. 97–446, 19 U.S.C. 2601 et seq.), the United States entered into a bilateral agreement with Cyprus on July 16, 2002, concerning the imposition of import restrictions on archeological material originating in Cyprus and representing the preClassical and Classical periods. On July 19, 2002, the former United States Customs Service published T.D. 02–37 in the Federal Register (67 FR 47447), which amended 19 CFR 12.104g(a) to indicate the imposition of these restrictions and included a list designating the types of archaeological material covered by the restrictions. The articles that were subject to emergency restrictions in 1999 were not included in the original list designated pursuant to the bilateral agreement. Amended Bilateral Agreement Since the emergency import restrictions on the Byzantine materials is due to expire on September 4, 2006, the Republic of Cyprus requested, through diplomatic channels, that the Byzantine materials that have been protected by the emergency action continue to be protected in the future by amending the existing bilateral agreement. After reviewing the findings and recommendations of the Cultural Property Advisory Committee, the Assistant Secretary for Educational and Cultural Affairs, United States Department of State, concluded that the cultural heritage of Cyprus continues to be in jeopardy from the pillage of certain Byzantine ecclesiastical and ritual ethnological materials ranging in date from approximately the 4th century A.D. through approximately the 15th century A.D. from Cyprus. On August 11, 2006, the Republic of Cyprus and the U.S. Government amended the bilateral agreement of July 16, 2002, pursuant to the provisions of 19 U.S.C. 2602 and Article 4(b) of the agreement, by including the list of Byzantine ecclesiastical and ritual ethnological material that were protected pursuant to the emergency E:\FR\FM\31AUR1.SGM 31AUR1 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 169 / Thursday, August 31, 2006 / Rules and Regulations action in the list of articles protected in the bilateral agreement. Please note that this amended bilateral agreement will expire on July 19, 2007, unless extended by the State Parties. Regulatory Action Accordingly, CBP is amending 19 CFR 12.104g(b) to remove the abovereferenced Byzantine materials from Cyprus from the list of import restrictions imposed by emergency action, and to reference these materials under the listing of cultural property (§ 12.104g(a)) protected pursuant to bilateral agreement. Lists of Protected Designated Articles The Designated List of articles that are otherwise protected pursuant to the bilateral agreement on archeological material originating in Cyprus and representing the pre-Classical and Classical periods ranging approximately from the 8th millennium B.C. to 330 A.D. is found in T.D. 02–37. The Designated List of Byzantine Ecclesiastical and Ritual Ethnological Material from Cyprus which is now encompassed within the bilateral agreement is set forth below. List of Ecclesiastical and Ritual Ethnological Material From Cyprus Representing the Byzantine Period Ecclesiastical and ritual ethnological material from Cyprus representing the Byzantine period dating from approximately the 4th century A.D. through the 15th century A.D., includes the categories listed below. The following list is representative only. I. Metal A. Bronze Ceremonial objects include crosses, censers (incense burners), rings, and buckles for ecclesiastical garments. The objects may be decorated with engraved or modeled designs or Greek inscriptions. Crosses, rings and buckles are often set with semi-precious stones. erjones on PROD1PC72 with RULES B. Lead Lead objects date to the Byzantine period and include ampulla (small bottle-shaped forms) used in religious observance. C. Silver and Gold Ceremonial vessels and objects used in ritual and as components of church treasure. Ceremonial objects include censers (incense burners), book covers, liturgical crosses, archbishop’s crowns, buckles, and chests. These are often decorated with molded or incised geometric motifs or scenes from the Bible, and encrusted with semi-precious VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:29 Aug 30, 2006 Jkt 208001 or precious stones. The gems themselves may be engraved with religious figures or inscriptions. Church treasure may include all of the above, as well as rings, earrings, and necklaces (some decorated with ecclesiastical themes) and other implements (e.g., spoons). II. Wood Artifacts made of wood are primarily those intended for ritual or ecclesiastical use during the Byzantine period. These include painted icons, painted wood screens (iconstasis), carved doors, crosses, painted wooded beams from churches or monasteries, thrones, chests and musical instruments. Religious figures (Christ, the Apostles, the Virgin, and others) predominate in the painted and carved figural decoration. Ecclesiastical furniture and architectural elements may also be decorated with geometric or floral designs. III. Ivory and Bone Ecclesiastical and ritual objects of ivory and bone boxes, plaques, pendants, candelabra, stamp rings, crosses. Carved and engraved decoration includes religious figures, scenes from the Bible, and floral and geometric designs. IV. Glass Ecclesiastical objects such as lamps and ritual vessels. V. Textiles—Ritual Garments Ecclesiastical garments and other ritual textiles from the Byzantine period. Robes, vestments and altar clothes are often of a fine fabric and richly embroidered in silver and gold. Embroidered designs include religious motifs and floral and geometric designs. VI. Stone A. Wall Mosaics Dating to the Byzantine period, wall mosaics are found in ecclesiastical buildings. These generally portray images of Christ, Archangels, and the Apostles in scenes of Biblical events. Surrounding panels may contain animal, floral, or geometric designs. B. Floor Mosaics Floor mosaics from ecclesiastical contexts. Examples include the mosaics at Nea Paphos, Kourion, Kouklia, Chrysopolitissa Basilica andCampanopetra Basilica. Floor mosaics may have animal, floral, geometric designs, or inscriptions. VII. Frescoes/Wall Paintings Wall paintings from the Byzantine period religious structures (churches, PO 00000 Frm 00013 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 51725 monasteries, chapels, etc.) Like the mosaics, wall paintings generally portray images of Christ, Archangels, and the Apostles in scenes of Biblical events. Surrounding paintings may contain animal, floral, or geometric designs. More information on import restrictions can be obtained from the International Cultural Property Protection Web site (http:// exchanges.state.gov/culprop). Inapplicability of Notice and Delayed Effective Date This amendment involves a foreign affairs function of the United States and is, therefore, being made without notice or public procedure (5 U.S.C. 553(a)(1)). In addition, CBP has determined that such notice or public procedure would be impracticable and contrary to the public interest because the action being taken is essential to avoid interruption of the application of the existing import restrictions (5 U.S.C. 553(b)(B)). For the same reasons, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3), a delayed effective date is not required. Regulatory Flexibility Act Because no notice of proposed rulemaking is required, the provisions of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) do not apply. Executive Order 12866 This amendment does not meet the criteria of a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ as described in Executive Order 12866. Signing Authority This regulation is being issued in accordance with 19 CFR 0.1(a)(1). List of Subjects in 19 CFR Part 12 Cultural property, Customs duties and inspection, Imports, Prohibited merchandise. Amendment to CBP Regulations For the reasons set forth above, part 12 of Title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations (19 CFR part 12), is amended as set forth below: I PART 12—SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE 1. The general authority citation for part 12 and the specific authority citation for § 12.104g continue to read as follows: I Authority: 5 U.S.C. 301; 19 U.S.C. 66, 1202 (General Note 3(i), Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS)), 1624; * E:\FR\FM\31AUR1.SGM * * 31AUR1 * * 51726 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 169 / Thursday, August 31, 2006 / Rules and Regulations Sections 12.104 through 12.104i also issued under 19 U.S.C. 2612; * * * * agreements imposing import restrictions on described articles of cultural property of State Parties is revised to read as follows: * 2. In § 12.104g, paragraph (a), the entry for Cyprus in the table of list of I § 12.104g Specific items or categories designated by agreements or emergency actions. (a) * * * State party Cultural property Decision No. * * Cyprus ............................................ * * * Archaeological Material of pre-Classical and Classical periods ranging approximately from the 8th millennium B.C. to 330 A.D. and ecclesiastical and ritual ethnological material representing the Byzantine period ranging from approximately the 4th century A.D. through approximately the 15th century A.D. * * T.D. 02–37, as amended by CBP Dec. 06–22. * * * * * * * * 3. In § 12.104g, paragraph (b), the table of the list of agreements imposing emergency import restrictions on described articles of cultural property of State Parties is amended by removing the entry for Cyprus, but by retaining the table headings. I Approved: August 25, 2006. Deborah J. Spero, Acting Commissioner, Bureau of Customs and Border Protection. Timothy E. Skud, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. [FR Doc. 06–7266 Filed 8–30–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–14–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 101 [Docket No. 1994P–0036] (Formerly 94P– 0036) Nutrition Labeling of Dietary Supplements; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule; technical amendment. erjones on PROD1PC72 with RULES ACTION: SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its nutrition labeling of dietary supplements regulations. This action is being taken to ensure the accuracy of FDA’s regulations. DATES: This rule is effective August 31, 2006. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Susan Thompson, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (HFS– 810), Food and Drug Administration, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park, MD 20740, 301–436–1784, FAX: 301– VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:29 Aug 30, 2006 Jkt 208001 * * 436–2639, or e-mail: Susan.Thompson@fda.hhs.gov. In the Federal Register of July 11, 2003 (68 FR 41434), FDA published a final rule entitled ‘‘Food Labeling: Trans Fatty Acids in Nutrition Labeling, Nutrient Content Claims, and Health Claims’’ (the trans fat rule). Among other things, the final rule amended § 101.36(b)(2)(i) (21 CFR 101.36(b)(2)(i)) by incorporating ‘‘trans fat’’ as a dietary ingredient that must be declared in the nutrition label of a dietary supplement when it is present in a dietary supplement in quantitative amounts by weight that exceed the amount that can be declared as zero in nutrition labeling of foods in accordance with § 101.9(c) (21 CFR 101.9(c)). Other than the addition of ‘‘trans fat’’ to the list of dietary ingredients subject to the requirements in § 101.36(b)(2)(i) (21 CFR 101.36(b)(2)(i)), no other changes to that section were proposed or finalized. However, in making this revision, requirements for dietary ingredients set forth in § 101.36(b)(2)(i) that were not affected by the addition of the term ‘‘trans fat’’ in that section were inadvertently deleted. The text of the requirements that were inadvertently removed from this section was ‘‘Calories from saturated fat and polyunsaturated fat, monounsaturated fat, soluble fiber, insoluble fiber, sugar alcohol, and other carbohydrate may be declared, but they shall be declared when a claim is made about them. Any other vitamins or minerals listed in § 101.9(c)(8)(iv) or (c)(9) may be declared, but they shall be declared when they are added to the product for purposes of supplementation, or when a claim is made about them. Any (b)(2)-dietary ingredients that are not present, or that are present in amounts that can be declared as zero in § 101.9(c), shall not be declared (e.g., amounts SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00014 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 * * corresponding to less than 2 percent of the RDI for vitamins and minerals). Protein shall not be declared on labels of products that, other than ingredients added solely for technological reasons, contain only individual amino acids.’’ Accordingly, because this regulation is not currently accurate, FDA is publishing this amendment to § 101.36(b)(2)(i) to ensure that it complete and accurate by restoring to the regulation the text of the requirements that were inadvertently deleted as a consequence of the revision introduced by the trans fat rule. List of Subjects in 21 CFR Part 101 Food labeling, Nutrition, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. PART 101—FOOD LABELING 1. The authority citation for 21 CFR part 101 continues to read as follows: I Authority: 15 U.S.C. 1453, 1454, 1455; 21 U.S.C. 321, 331, 342, 343, 348, 371; 42 U.S.C. 243, 264, 271. 2. In § 101.36, revise paragraph (b)(2)(i) to read as follows: I § 101.36 Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements. * * * * * (b) * * * (2) * * * (i) The (b)(2)-dietary ingredients to be declared, that is, total calories, calories from fat, total fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, total carbohydrate, dietary fiber, sugars, protein, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium and iron, shall be declared when they are present in a dietary supplement in quantitative amounts by weight that exceed the amount that can be declared as zero in nutrition labeling of foods in accordance with § 101.9(c). Calories from saturated fat and polyunsaturated fat, monounsaturated fat, soluble fiber, insoluble fiber, sugar alcohol, and other carbohydrate may be declared, but they E:\FR\FM\31AUR1.SGM 31AUR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 71, Number 169 (Thursday, August 31, 2006)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 51724-51726]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 06-7266]


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DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

Bureau of Customs and Border Protection

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

19 CFR Part 12

[CBP Dec. 06-22]
RIN 1505-AB72


Import Restrictions on Byzantine Ecclesiastical and Ritual 
Ethnological Material From Cyprus

AGENCY: Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security; 
Treasury.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This document amends the Bureau of Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP) regulations by reflecting that the bilateral agreement 
between Cyprus and the U.S. to impose certain import restrictions on 
archaeological material from Cyprus has been amended to include import 
restrictions which had been previously imposed on an emergency basis 
for certain Byzantine period ecclesiastical and ritual ethnological 
material.

DATES: Effective Date: These regulations are effective on September 4, 
2006.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For legal aspects, George F. McCray, 
Esq., Chief, Intellectual Property Rights and Restricted Merchandise 
Branch, (202) 572-8710. For operational aspects, Michael Craig, Chief, 
Other Government Agencies Branch, (202) 344-1684.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

    Since the passage of the Cultural Property Implementation Act (19 
U.S.C. 2601 et seq.), import restrictions have been imposed on 
archaeological and ethnological artifacts of a number of signatory 
nations. These restrictions have been imposed either as a result of 
requests for emergency protection received from those nations or 
pursuant to bilateral agreements between the U.S. and other countries.
    Pursuant to Article 9 of the 1970 Convention on the Means of 
Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of 
Ownership of Cultural Property, and Sec. 303(a)(3) of the Convention on 
Cultural Property Implementation Act (19 U.S.C. 2602(a)(3)), a State 
Party to the 1970 UNESCO Convention, may request that the U.S. 
Government impose import restrictions on certain categories of 
archaeological and/or ethnological material the pillage of which, if 
alleged, jeopardizes the national cultural patrimony.

Import Restrictions Imposed on an Emergency Basis

    On March 4, 1999, and in response to the determination that an 
emergency condition applies with respect to certain Byzantine 
ecclesiastical and ritual ethnological material from Cyprus, the U.S. 
Government made the determination that emergency import restrictions be 
imposed. Accordingly, on April 12, 1999, the former United States 
Customs Service published Treasury Decision (T.D.) 99-35 in the Federal 
Register (64 FR 17529), which amended 19 CFR 12.104g(b) to indicate the 
imposition of these emergency import restrictions. In that Treasury 
Decision, a list designating the types of ethnological materials 
covered by these restrictions for a five-year period, is set forth.
    These emergency import restrictions were later extended by CBP Dec. 
03-25 for an additional three-year period. (See 68 FR 51903, August 29, 
2003). These emergency import restrictions are scheduled to expire on 
September 4, 2006.

Import Restrictions Imposed Pursuant to Bilateral Agreement

    Pursuant to the provisions of the 1970 United Nations Educational, 
Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Convention, codified into 
U.S. law as the Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act 
(Pub. L. 97-446, 19 U.S.C. 2601 et seq.), the United States entered 
into a bilateral agreement with Cyprus on July 16, 2002, concerning the 
imposition of import restrictions on archeological material originating 
in Cyprus and representing the pre-Classical and Classical periods. On 
July 19, 2002, the former United States Customs Service published T.D. 
02-37 in the Federal Register (67 FR 47447), which amended 19 CFR 
12.104g(a) to indicate the imposition of these restrictions and 
included a list designating the types of archaeological material 
covered by the restrictions. The articles that were subject to 
emergency restrictions in 1999 were not included in the original list 
designated pursuant to the bilateral agreement.

Amended Bilateral Agreement

    Since the emergency import restrictions on the Byzantine materials 
is due to expire on September 4, 2006, the Republic of Cyprus 
requested, through diplomatic channels, that the Byzantine materials 
that have been protected by the emergency action continue to be 
protected in the future by amending the existing bilateral agreement.
    After reviewing the findings and recommendations of the Cultural 
Property Advisory Committee, the Assistant Secretary for Educational 
and Cultural Affairs, United States Department of State, concluded that 
the cultural heritage of Cyprus continues to be in jeopardy from the 
pillage of certain Byzantine ecclesiastical and ritual ethnological 
materials ranging in date from approximately the 4th century A.D. 
through approximately the 15th century A.D. from Cyprus.
    On August 11, 2006, the Republic of Cyprus and the U.S. Government 
amended the bilateral agreement of July 16, 2002, pursuant to the 
provisions of 19 U.S.C. 2602 and Article 4(b) of the agreement, by 
including the list of Byzantine ecclesiastical and ritual ethnological 
material that were protected pursuant to the emergency

[[Page 51725]]

action in the list of articles protected in the bilateral agreement. 
Please note that this amended bilateral agreement will expire on July 
19, 2007, unless extended by the State Parties.

Regulatory Action

    Accordingly, CBP is amending 19 CFR 12.104g(b) to remove the above-
referenced Byzantine materials from Cyprus from the list of import 
restrictions imposed by emergency action, and to reference these 
materials under the listing of cultural property (Sec.  12.104g(a)) 
protected pursuant to bilateral agreement.

Lists of Protected Designated Articles

    The Designated List of articles that are otherwise protected 
pursuant to the bilateral agreement on archeological material 
originating in Cyprus and representing the pre-Classical and Classical 
periods ranging approximately from the 8th millennium B.C. to 330 A.D. 
is found in T.D. 02-37.
    The Designated List of Byzantine Ecclesiastical and Ritual 
Ethnological Material from Cyprus which is now encompassed within the 
bilateral agreement is set forth below.

List of Ecclesiastical and Ritual Ethnological Material From Cyprus 
Representing the Byzantine Period

    Ecclesiastical and ritual ethnological material from Cyprus 
representing the Byzantine period dating from approximately the 4th 
century A.D. through the 15th century A.D., includes the categories 
listed below. The following list is representative only.
I. Metal
A. Bronze
    Ceremonial objects include crosses, censers (incense burners), 
rings, and buckles for ecclesiastical garments. The objects may be 
decorated with engraved or modeled designs or Greek inscriptions. 
Crosses, rings and buckles are often set with semi-precious stones.
B. Lead
    Lead objects date to the Byzantine period and include ampulla 
(small bottle-shaped forms) used in religious observance.
C. Silver and Gold
    Ceremonial vessels and objects used in ritual and as components of 
church treasure. Ceremonial objects include censers (incense burners), 
book covers, liturgical crosses, archbishop's crowns, buckles, and 
chests. These are often decorated with molded or incised geometric 
motifs or scenes from the Bible, and encrusted with semi-precious or 
precious stones. The gems themselves may be engraved with religious 
figures or inscriptions. Church treasure may include all of the above, 
as well as rings, earrings, and necklaces (some decorated with 
ecclesiastical themes) and other implements (e.g., spoons).
II. Wood
    Artifacts made of wood are primarily those intended for ritual or 
ecclesiastical use during the Byzantine period. These include painted 
icons, painted wood screens (iconstasis), carved doors, crosses, 
painted wooded beams from churches or monasteries, thrones, chests and 
musical instruments. Religious figures (Christ, the Apostles, the 
Virgin, and others) predominate in the painted and carved figural 
decoration. Ecclesiastical furniture and architectural elements may 
also be decorated with geometric or floral designs.
III. Ivory and Bone
    Ecclesiastical and ritual objects of ivory and bone boxes, plaques, 
pendants, candelabra, stamp rings, crosses. Carved and engraved 
decoration includes religious figures, scenes from the Bible, and 
floral and geometric designs.
IV. Glass
    Ecclesiastical objects such as lamps and ritual vessels.
V. Textiles--Ritual Garments
    Ecclesiastical garments and other ritual textiles from the 
Byzantine period. Robes, vestments and altar clothes are often of a 
fine fabric and richly embroidered in silver and gold. Embroidered 
designs include religious motifs and floral and geometric designs.
VI. Stone
A. Wall Mosaics
    Dating to the Byzantine period, wall mosaics are found in 
ecclesiastical buildings. These generally portray images of Christ, 
Archangels, and the Apostles in scenes of Biblical events. Surrounding 
panels may contain animal, floral, or geometric designs.
B. Floor Mosaics
    Floor mosaics from ecclesiastical contexts. Examples include the 
mosaics at Nea Paphos, Kourion, Kouklia, Chrysopolitissa Basilica 
andCampanopetra Basilica. Floor mosaics may have animal, floral, 
geometric designs, or inscriptions.
VII. Frescoes/Wall Paintings
    Wall paintings from the Byzantine period religious structures 
(churches, monasteries, chapels, etc.) Like the mosaics, wall paintings 
generally portray images of Christ, Archangels, and the Apostles in 
scenes of Biblical events. Surrounding paintings may contain animal, 
floral, or geometric designs.
    More information on import restrictions can be obtained from the 
International Cultural Property Protection Web site (http://
exchanges.state.gov/culprop).

Inapplicability of Notice and Delayed Effective Date

    This amendment involves a foreign affairs function of the United 
States and is, therefore, being made without notice or public procedure 
(5 U.S.C. 553(a)(1)). In addition, CBP has determined that such notice 
or public procedure would be impracticable and contrary to the public 
interest because the action being taken is essential to avoid 
interruption of the application of the existing import restrictions (5 
U.S.C. 553(b)(B)). For the same reasons, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 
553(d)(3), a delayed effective date is not required.

Regulatory Flexibility Act

    Because no notice of proposed rulemaking is required, the 
provisions of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) do 
not apply.

Executive Order 12866

    This amendment does not meet the criteria of a ``significant 
regulatory action'' as described in Executive Order 12866.

Signing Authority

    This regulation is being issued in accordance with 19 CFR 
0.1(a)(1).

List of Subjects in 19 CFR Part 12

    Cultural property, Customs duties and inspection, Imports, 
Prohibited merchandise.

Amendment to CBP Regulations

0
For the reasons set forth above, part 12 of Title 19 of the Code of 
Federal Regulations (19 CFR part 12), is amended as set forth below:

PART 12--SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE

0
1. The general authority citation for part 12 and the specific 
authority citation for Sec.  12.104g continue to read as follows:

    Authority: 5 U.S.C. 301; 19 U.S.C. 66, 1202 (General Note 3(i), 
Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS)), 1624;
* * * * *

[[Page 51726]]

    Sections 12.104 through 12.104i also issued under 19 U.S.C. 
2612;
* * * * *


0
2. In Sec.  12.104g, paragraph (a), the entry for Cyprus in the table 
of list of agreements imposing import restrictions on described 
articles of cultural property of State Parties is revised to read as 
follows:


Sec.  12.104g  Specific items or categories designated by agreements or 
emergency actions.

    (a) * * *

------------------------------------------------------------------------
          State party              Cultural property      Decision No.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                              * * * * * * *
Cyprus........................  Archaeological          T.D. 02-37, as
                                 Material of pre-        amended by CBP
                                 Classical and           Dec. 06-22.
                                 Classical periods
                                 ranging approximately
                                 from the 8th
                                 millennium B.C. to
                                 330 A.D. and
                                 ecclesiastical and
                                 ritual ethnological
                                 material representing
                                 the Byzantine period
                                 ranging from
                                 approximately the 4th
                                 century A.D. through
                                 approximately the
                                 15th century A.D.
 
                              * * * * * * *
------------------------------------------------------------------------

* * * * *

0
3. In Sec.  12.104g, paragraph (b), the table of the list of agreements 
imposing emergency import restrictions on described articles of 
cultural property of State Parties is amended by removing the entry for 
Cyprus, but by retaining the table headings.

    Approved: August 25, 2006.
Deborah J. Spero,
Acting Commissioner, Bureau of Customs and Border Protection.
Timothy E. Skud,
Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury.
[FR Doc. 06-7266 Filed 8-30-06; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 9111-14-P