Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 767-400ER Series Airplanes and Model 777-200 and -300 Series Airplanes, 49328-49332 [E6-13825]

Download as PDF 49328 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 163 / Wednesday, August 23, 2006 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2005–21713; Directorate Identifier 2005–NM–085–AD; Amendment 39–14732; AD 2006–17–11] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 767–400ER Series Airplanes and Model 777–200 and –300 Series Airplanes Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. sroberts on PROD1PC70 with RULES AGENCY: SUMMARY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Boeing Model 767–400ER series airplanes and Model 777–200 and –300 series airplanes. This AD requires, for certain airplanes, repetitive testing of the fill and safety fittings of the cargo fire extinguishing bottles in the forward cargo compartment for leaks; and repetitive application of a corrosion inhibiting compound (CIC) or replacement of the cargo fire extinguishing bottles with reworked fire extinguishing bottles, as necessary. For all airplanes, this AD requires replacement of the cargo fire extinguishing bottles with reworked fire extinguishing bottles, which ends the repetitive tests and CIC applications if applicable. This AD results from failure of the safety fittings for the cargo fire extinguishing bottles. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the safety fittings for the cargo fire extinguishing bottles due to corrosion, which could result in leakage of extinguishing agent. If a fire occurs in the cargo bay, the cargo fire extinguishing bottles could have less than enough extinguishing agent to control a fire. DATES: This AD becomes effective September 27, 2006. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in the AD as of September 27, 2006. ADDRESSES: You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http:// dms.dot.gov or in person at the Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Nassif Building, Room PL–401, Washington, DC. Contact Boeing Commercial Airplanes, P.O. Box 3707, Seattle, Washington 98124–2207, for service information identified in this AD. VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:49 Aug 22, 2006 Jkt 208001 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Barbara Mudrovich, Aerospace Engineer, Cabin Safety and Environmental Systems Branch, ANM– 150S, FAA, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington 98057–3356; telephone (425) 917–6477; fax (425) 917–6590. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Examining the Docket You may examine the airworthiness directive (AD) docket on the Internet at http://dms.dot.gov or in person at the Docket Management Facility office between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The Docket Management Facility office (telephone (800) 647–5227) is located on the plaza level of the Nassif Building at the street address stated in the ADDRESSES section. Discussion The FAA issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR part 39 to include an AD that would apply to certain Boeing Model 767– 400ER series airplanes and Model 777– 200 and –300 series airplanes. That NPRM was published in the Federal Register on July 5, 2005 (70 FR 38632). That NPRM proposed to require, for certain airplanes, repetitive testing of the fill and safety fittings of the fire extinguishing bottles in the forward cargo compartment for leaks; and repetitive application of a corrosion inhibiting compound (CIC) or replacement of the fire extinguishing bottles with reworked fire extinguishing bottles, as necessary. That NPRM also proposed to require, for all airplanes, replacement of the fire extinguishing bottles with reworked fire extinguishing bottles, which would end the repetitive tests and CIC applications if applicable. Actions Since NPRM Was Issued Since we issued the NPRM, Boeing has published Special Attention Service Bulletin 767–26–0124, Revision 1, dated April 13, 2006. We referenced the original issue of that service bulletin, dated December 5, 2002, in the NPRM as the appropriate source of service information for testing the cargo fire extinguishing bottles on Model 767– 400ER series airplanes. The procedures in Revision 1 of the service bulletin are essentially the same as those in the original issue. Revision 1 corrects a reference to the Boeing 767 Aircraft Maintenance Manual (AMM), which we noted as a difference in the NPRM. Therefore, we have revised this AD to reference Revision 1 of the service bulletin as the appropriate source of service information for testing the cargo PO 00000 Frm 00020 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 fire extinguishing bottles on Model 767– 400ER series airplanes. We have also added a new paragraph (k) to this AD, giving credit for testing done before the effective date of this AD in accordance with the original issue of the service bulletin. We have reidentified the subsequent paragraphs accordingly. Comments We provided the public the opportunity to participate in the development of this AD. We have considered the comments received. Request for Credit for Additional Model Airplanes Boeing requests that we revise paragraph (j) of the NPRM to include Model 767–400ER series airplanes and Model 777–300 series airplanes. (The NPRM provided credit only for Model 777–200 series airplanes.) As justification, Boeing states that this change will provide credit for all three affected model airplanes, not just the Model 777–200 series airplanes. We infer Boeing would like credit for accomplishment of Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 767–26– 0124, dated December 5, 2002, for Model 767–400ER series airplanes; and Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 777–26–0034, dated January 22, 2004, for Model 777–300 series airplanes. We agree to provide credit for all Model 767–400ER series airplanes. As stated previously, we have given credit to Model 767–400ER series airplanes in paragraph (k) of this AD. We agree only to provide credit for certain Model 777–300 series airplanes. Certain Model 777–300 series airplanes were misidentified as Group 1 airplanes in the original issue of Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 777–26– 0034. Revision 1 of Boeing Service Bulletin 777–26–0034, dated July 1, 2004, states that more work is necessary on Model 777–300 series airplanes if the Group 1 instructions of the original service bulletin were accomplished on those airplanes. However, no additional work is necessary for Model 777–300 series airplanes if the Group 2 instructions of the original service bulletin were accomplished on those airplanes. Therefore, we have revised paragraph (j) of this AD to give credit only for Model 777–300 series airplanes identified as Group 2 in the original issue of the service bulletin. Under the provisions of paragraph (l) of this AD, we may consider requests for approval of an alternative method of compliance (AMOC) if sufficient data are submitted to substantiate that such a method E:\FR\FM\23AUR1.SGM 23AUR1 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 163 / Wednesday, August 23, 2006 / Rules and Regulations would provide an acceptable level of safety. on Model 767–400ER series airplanes are identical to one of the bottles that is installed on Model 777–300 series airplanes, but not installed on Model 777–200 series airplanes. We agree with Boeing’s statements. However, the Discussion section of an NPRM is not restated in the AD. Therefore, no change to this AD is necessary in this regard. Request To Clarify the Affected Fire Extinguishing Bottles Boeing requests that we specifically refer to ‘‘cargo’’ fire extinguishing bottles in the NPRM. As justification, Boeing states that this will avoid confusion with the fire extinguishing bottles for the engine/auxiliary power unit. We agree and have revised all references accordingly in this AD. Request To Revise Terminology Boeing states that the safety disc inside the fill fitting is referred to as ‘‘fill and safety fittings,’’ ‘‘safety fittings,’’ or ‘‘burst disc inside the safety fitting’’ in several paragraphs in the NPRM. Boeing requests that we revise the NPRM to use its preferred terminology of ‘‘safety disc inside the fill fitting.’’ We agree and have revised the terminology in paragraph (g)(1) of this AD. We point out that we used the term ‘‘burst disc inside the safety filling’’ in the NPRM to match the terminology used in the referenced Boeing and Kidde Aerospace service bulletins for replacing the cargo fire extinguishing bottles. We have continued using the term ‘‘fill and safety fittings’’ in paragraph (g) of this AD as it is specified in the applicable Kidde Aerospace service bulletins. Request To Revise Model Designation Boeing also requests that we fix the typographical error for the model designation in the first row of the Estimated Costs table of the NPRM. Boeing states the correct model designation is Model 767–400ER. We agree and have revised the Estimated Costs table in this AD accordingly. Request To Revise ‘‘Discussion’’ Section Boeing also requests that we revise the first sentence of the first paragraph in the Discussion section of the NPRM as follows: We have received a report indicating that failed safety fittings of the fire extinguishing bottles located in the forward lower lobe. * * *. sroberts on PROD1PC70 with RULES The commenter also requests that we change the second paragraph of the Discussion section to the following: The cargo fire extinguishing bottles installed on Model 767–400ER series airplanes are identical to metered cargo fire bottles on the 777–300 series airplanes. Therefore, all of these models are subject to the same unsafe condition. As justification for the second part of its request, Boeing states that all the cargo fire extinguishing bottles installed VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:49 Aug 22, 2006 Jkt 208001 Request To Identify the Affected Cargo Fire Extinguishing Bottles The Modification and Repair Parts Association (MARPA) requests that we include sufficient information to specify the precise applicability of the NPRM. MARPA states that the NPRM relies on certain Boeing and Kidde Aerospace service bulletins that were not incorporated by reference when the NPRM was published in the Federal Register. Since these service bulletins are copyrighted material, MARPA states it cannot determine the precise applicability of the NPRM. We infer the commenter would like us to identify the affected cargo fire extinguishing bottles in this AD. We do not agree to specify the affected part numbers in this AD. It is our general practice to reference the appropriate service information, since the affected part numbers are clearly specified in that referenced information. Not only does it appear redundant to repeat those part numbers in this AD, but if there was a large number of parts involved, it would increase the risk of error in repeating those part numbers in this AD. However, we are currently in the process of reviewing issues surrounding the posting of service bulletins on the Department of Transportation’s Docket Management System (DMS) as part of an AD docket. Once we have thoroughly examined all aspects of this issue and have made a final determination, we will consider whether our current practice needs to be revised. However, we consider that to delay this AD action would be inappropriate, since we have determined that an unsafe condition exists and that replacement of certain parts must be accomplished to ensure continued safety. Therefore, no change has been made to this AD in this regard. Request To Reference Parts Manufacturer Approval (PMA) Parts MARPA also requests that we add language to the NPRM to account for the possible existence of alternative PMA equivalent parts. MARPA states that, under 14 CFR 21.303, there may be PMA parts that should also be affected by the NPRM. As justification, MARPA states that some PMA parts appear to be PO 00000 Frm 00021 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 49329 similar to the affected parts addressed in the NPRM, and that further research should be conducted to ensure that all affected parts are included in the NPRM. MARPA further states that there may also be PMA parts equivalent to the ‘‘new and improved’’ replacement parts specified in the NPRM. We concur with MARPA’s general request that, if we know that an unsafe condition also exists in PMA parts, the AD should address those parts, as well as the original parts. At this time, we are not aware of other PMA parts equivalent to the affected cargo fire extinguishing bottles. Furthermore, we infer that MARPA would like the AD to permit installation of any equivalent PMA parts so that it is not necessary for an operator to request approval of an AMOC in order to install an ‘‘equivalent’’ PMA part. Whether an alternative part is ‘‘equivalent’’ in adequately resolving the unsafe condition can only be determined on a case-by-case basis, based on a complete understanding of the unsafe condition. We are not currently aware of any such parts. Our policy is that, in order for operators to replace a part with one that is not specified in the AD, they must request an AMOC. This is necessary so that we can make a specific determination that an alternative part is or is not susceptible to the same unsafe condition. MARPA’s remarks are timely in that the Transport Airplane Directorate currently is in the process of reviewing this issue as it applies to transport category airplanes. We acknowledge that there may be other ways of addressing this issue to ensure that unsafe PMA parts are identified and addressed. Once we have thoroughly examined all aspects of this issue, including input from industry, and have made a final determination, we will consider whether our policy regarding addressing PMA parts in ADs needs to be revised. We consider that to delay this AD action would be inappropriate, since we have determined that an unsafe condition exists and that replacement of certain parts must be accomplished to ensure continued safety. Therefore, no change has been made to this AD in this regard. Request To Delete Difference Paragraph Boeing states that it intends to publish Revision 1 to Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 767–26–0124 to correct the reference to the AMM, which we identified as a difference in the NPRM. Boeing also states that Revision 1 is currently being routed for approval. We infer the commenter would like us to E:\FR\FM\23AUR1.SGM 23AUR1 49330 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 163 / Wednesday, August 23, 2006 / Rules and Regulations delete the difference paragraph. We disagree, since the difference paragraph is not restated in this AD. Since we have already revised this AD to reference Revision 1 of the service bulletin, as described previously, no additional change to this AD is necessary. Request To Revise the Costs of Compliance Paragraph American Airlines states that the total cost for testing the cargo fire extinguishing bottles as specified in Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 777–26–0033, dated December 5, 2002, is $5,460, per test cycle. The commenter also states that the total cost for replacing the cargo fire extinguishing bottles as specified in Boeing Service Bulletin 777–26–0034, Revision 1, dated July 1, 2004, is $287,573. We infer that American Airlines would like us to revise the Costs of Compliance paragraph. We disagree. The cost information in an AD describes only the direct costs of the specific actions required by the AD. Based on the best data available, the manufacturer provided the number of work hours necessary to do the required actions. This number represents the time necessary to perform only the actions actually required by this AD. We recognize that, in doing the actions required by an AD, operators may incur incidental costs in addition to the direct costs. The cost analysis in AD rulemaking actions, however, typically does not include incidental costs such as the time required to gain access and close up, time necessary for planning, or time necessitated by other administrative actions. Those incidental costs, which may vary significantly among operators, are almost impossible to calculate. Therefore, no change has been made to this AD in this regard. Clarification of AMOC Paragraph We have revised this action to clarify the appropriate procedure for notifying the principal inspector before using any approved AMOC on any airplane to which the AMOC applies. Conclusion We have carefully reviewed the available data, including the comments received, and determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting the AD with the changes described previously. We have determined that these changes will neither increase the economic burden on any operator nor increase the scope of the AD. Costs of Compliance There are about 322 airplanes of the affected design in the worldwide fleet. This AD affects about 167 airplanes of U.S. registry. The following table provides the estimated costs, at an average labor rate of $65 per hour, for U.S. operators to comply with this AD. ESTIMATED COSTS Airplanes Action Model 767–400ER series airplanes (for all 4 cargo fire extinguishing bottles). Work hours Leak test, per test cycle. Replacement .......... Leak test, per test cycle. Replacement .......... Model 777–200 and –300 series airplanes (for all 5 cargo fire extinguishing bottles). sroberts on PROD1PC70 with RULES Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, Section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701, ‘‘General requirements.’’ Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this rulemaking action. VerDate Aug<31>2005 15:49 Aug 22, 2006 Jkt 208001 Cost per airplane 4 None .......... $260, per test cycle 36 8 5 $2,800 ....... None .......... $3,320 .................... $325, per test cycle 36 130 $9,360, per test cycle. $119,520. $42,250, per test cycle. 10 $3,400 ....... $4,050 .................... 131 $530,550. Regulatory Findings We have determined that this AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; (2) Is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. We prepared a regulatory evaluation of the estimated costs to comply with this AD and placed it in the AD docket. See the ADDRESSES section for a location to examine the regulatory evaluation. PO 00000 Frm 00022 Number of U.S.-registered airplanes Parts Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Fleet cost List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. Adoption of the Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows: I PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: I Authority : 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 [Amended] 2. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) amends § 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): I 2006–17–11 Boeing: Amendment 39–14732. Docket No. FAA–2005–21713; Directorate Identifier 2005–NM–085–AD. E:\FR\FM\23AUR1.SGM 23AUR1 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 163 / Wednesday, August 23, 2006 / Rules and Regulations Effective Date TABLE 1.—APPLICABILITY (a) This AD becomes effective September 27, 2006. (b) None. As Identified in— 767–400ER series airplanes. Affected ADs Boeing Model— Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 767– 26–0125, dated January 22, 2004. Boeing Service Bulletin 777–26–0034, Revision 1, dated July 1, 2004. Applicability (c) This AD applies to the airplanes listed in Table 1 of this AD, certificated in any category: 777–200 and –300 series airplanes. Unsafe Condition (d) This AD was prompted by failure of the safety fittings for the cargo fire extinguishing bottles. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the safety fittings for the cargo fire 49331 extinguishing bottles due to corrosion, which could result in leakage of extinguishing agent. If a fire occurs in the cargo bay, the cargo fire extinguishing bottles could have less than enough extinguishing agent to control a fire. Compliance (e) You are responsible for having the actions required by this AD performed within the compliance times specified, unless the actions have already been done. Service Bulletin References (f) The term ‘‘service bulletin,’’ as used in this AD, means the Accomplishment Instructions of the service bulletins identified in Table 2 of this AD, as applicable: TABLE 2.—SERVICE BULLETIN REFERENCES For model— Boeing— For the— 767–400ER series airplanes ............ Special Attention Service Bulletin 767–26–0124, Revision 1, dated April 13, 2006. Special Attention Service Bulletin 767–26–0125, dated January 22, 2004 777–200 and –300 series airplanes Special Attention Service Bulletin 777–26–0033, dated December 5, 2002. Service Bulletin 777–26–0034, Revision 1, dated July 1, 2004 ................. Test specified in paragraph (g) of this AD. Replacement specified in paragraph (h) of this AD. Test specified in paragraph (g) of this AD. Replacement specified in paragraph (h) of this AD. Repetitive Testing of Cargo Fire Extinguishing Bottles (g) For all Model 767–400ER series airplanes; and the Model 777–200 and –300 series airplanes identified in Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 777–26–0033, dated December 5, 2002: Within 18 months or 6,000 flight hours after the effective date of this AD, whichever is first, test the fill and safety fittings of the cargo fire extinguishing bottles in the forward cargo compartment for leaks, in accordance with the applicable service bulletin. Repeat the test thereafter at intervals not to exceed 18 months or 6,000 flight hours, whichever is first, in accordance with the service bulletin, until the replacement required by paragraph (h) of this AD is accomplished. (1) If no leak is found or if the leak rate is below the calibrated rate specified in the service bulletin, before further flight, apply the corrosion inhibiting compound (CIC) to the safety disc inside the fill fitting and reidentify the cargo fire extinguishing bottle, in accordance with the applicable service bulletin. (2) If any leak above the calibrated rate specified in the service bulletin is found, before further flight, replace and reidentify the cargo fire extinguishing bottle with new or reworked fire extinguishing bottles, in accordance with the applicable service bulletin; except where the service bulletin specifies that the replacement may be accomplished according to an operator’s ‘‘equivalent procedure,’’ replace in accordance with a method approved by the Manager, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office (ACO), FAA. Chapter 26–23–02/401 of the Boeing 767 Aircraft Maintenance Manual (AMM) or Chapter 26–23–01/401 of the Boeing 777 AMM, as applicable, is one approved method. Note 1: The Boeing service bulletins listed in Table 3 of this AD refer to certain Kidde Aerospace service bulletins, as applicable, as additional sources of service information for testing and reidentifying the cargo fire extinguishing bottles. TABLE 3.—ADDITIONAL SERVICE INFORMATION FOR TESTING For model— 767–400ER series airplanes. 777–200 and –300 series airplanes. Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin— 767–26–0124, Revision 1, dated April 13, 2006. 777–26–0033, dated December 5, 2002 sroberts on PROD1PC70 with RULES Replacement of Cargo Fire Extinguishing Bottles (h) For all airplanes: Within 60 months after the effective date of this AD, replace the existing cargo fire extinguishing bottles with reworked fire extinguishing bottles, in accordance with the applicable service VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:06 Aug 22, 2006 Jkt 208001 Refers to Kidde Aerospace Service Bulletin— 473876–26–454. Revision 1, dated version of this service bulletin. 473474–26–442. Revision 1, dated version of this service bulletin. 473475–26–443. Revision 1, dated version of this service bulletin. 473854–26–444. Revision 1, dated version of this service bulletin. 473876–26–445. Revision 1, dated version of this service bulletin. bulletin. Replacement of a cargo fire extinguishing bottle with a reworked fire extinguishing bottle terminates the repetitive tests and CIC applications required by paragraph (g) of this AD for that fire extinguishing bottle only. Note 2: The Boeing service bulletins listed in Table 4 of this AD refer to certain Kidde PO 00000 Frm 00023 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 March 12, 2003, is the latest March 12, 2003, is the latest March 12, 2003, is the latest March 12, 2003, is the latest March 12, 2003, is the latest Aerospace service bulletins, as applicable, as additional sources of service information for reworking the cargo fire extinguishing bottles. E:\FR\FM\23AUR1.SGM 23AUR1 49332 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 163 / Wednesday, August 23, 2006 / Rules and Regulations TABLE 4.—ADDITIONAL SERVICE INFORMATION FOR REPLACEMENT For model— Boeing— 767–400ER series airplanes .............................. 777–200 and –300 series airplanes ................... Special 0125, Service dated Refers to Kidde Aerospace Service Bulletin— Attention Service Bulletin 767–26– dated January 22, 2004 Bulletin 777–26–0034, Revision 1, July 1, 2004. 473876–26–453, dated January 22, 2004. 473474–26–450, dated January 22, 2004. 473475–26–451, dated January 22, 2004. 473854–26–452, dated January 22, 2004. 473876–26–453, dated January 22, 2004. Parts Installation (i) For all airplanes: As of the effective date of this AD, no person may install a cargo fire extinguishing bottle, part numbers (P/Ns) 473474–1 and –2, P/Ns 473475–1 and –2, P/Ns 473854–1 and –2, or P/Ns 473876–1 and –2, on any airplane, unless the initial test required by paragraph (g) of this AD is accomplished. Credit for Previous Service Bulletins (j) For all Model 777–200 series airplanes; and Model 777–300 series airplanes identified as Group 2 in Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 777–26–0034, dated January 22, 2004: Actions done before the effective date of this AD in accordance with Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 777–26–0034, dated January 22, 2004, are acceptable for compliance with the corresponding requirements of this AD. (k) For all Model 767–400ER series airplanes: Actions done before the effective date of this AD in accordance with Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 767–26– 0124, dated December 5, 2002, are acceptable for compliance with the corresponding requirements of this AD. Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) (l)(1) The Manager, Seattle ACO, FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested in accordance with the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. (2) Before using any AMOC approved in accordance with 14 CFR 39.19 on any airplane to which the AMOC applies, notify the appropriate principal inspector in the FAA Flight Standards Certificate Holding District Office. Material Incorporated by Reference (m) You must use the service information in Table 5 of this AD to perform the actions that are required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of these documents in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Contact Boeing Commercial Airplanes, P.O. Box 3707, Seattle, Washington 98124–2207, for a copy of this service information. You may review copies at the Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Room PL–401, Nassif Building, Washington, DC; on the Internet at http:// dms.dot.gov; or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at the NARA, call (202) 741–6030, or go to http://www.archives.gov/ federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ ibr_locations.html. TABLE 5.—MATERIAL INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE Service Bulletin Boeing Boeing Boeing Boeing Revision level Service Bulletin 777–26–0034 ................................................................. Special Attention Service Bulletin 767–26–0124 ..................................... Special Attention Service Bulletin 767–26–0125 ..................................... Special Attention Service Bulletin 777–26–0033 ..................................... Issued in Renton, Washington, on August 10, 2006. Kalene C. Yanamura, Acting Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. E6–13825 Filed 8–22–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P 1 ............................................................ 1 ............................................................ Original .................................................. Original .................................................. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2006–24290; Directorate Identifier 2005–NM–243–AD; Amendment 39–14731; AD 2006–17–10] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier Model DHC–8–100, DHC–8–200, and DHC–8–300 Series Airplanes Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. sroberts on PROD1PC70 with RULES AGENCY: SUMMARY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Bombardier Model DHC–8–100, DHC– 8–200, and DHC–8–300 series airplanes. This AD requires repetitive inspections of the fluorescent light tube assemblies VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:06 Aug 22, 2006 Jkt 208001 PO 00000 Frm 00024 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Date July 1, 2004. April 13, 2006. January 22, 2004. December 5, 2002. of the cabin, lavatory, and sidewall, and corrective actions if necessary. This AD also provides for optional terminating action for the repetitive inspections. This AD results from reports of overheating due to arcing between the fluorescent tube pins and the lamp holder contacts. The tubes had not been properly seated during installation. We are issuing this AD to prevent fumes, traces of visible smoke, and fire at the fluorescent light tube assembly. This AD becomes effective September 27, 2006. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in the AD as of September 27, 2006. DATES: You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http:// dms.dot.gov or in person at the Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 400 Seventh Street ADDRESSES: E:\FR\FM\23AUR1.SGM 23AUR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 71, Number 163 (Wednesday, August 23, 2006)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 49328-49332]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E6-13825]



[[Page 49328]]

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2005-21713; Directorate Identifier 2005-NM-085-AD; 
Amendment 39-14732; AD 2006-17-11]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; Boeing Model 767-400ER Series Airplanes 
and Model 777-200 and -300 Series Airplanes

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of 
Transportation (DOT).

ACTION: Final rule.

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SUMMARY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for 
certain Boeing Model 767-400ER series airplanes and Model 777-200 and -
300 series airplanes. This AD requires, for certain airplanes, 
repetitive testing of the fill and safety fittings of the cargo fire 
extinguishing bottles in the forward cargo compartment for leaks; and 
repetitive application of a corrosion inhibiting compound (CIC) or 
replacement of the cargo fire extinguishing bottles with reworked fire 
extinguishing bottles, as necessary. For all airplanes, this AD 
requires replacement of the cargo fire extinguishing bottles with 
reworked fire extinguishing bottles, which ends the repetitive tests 
and CIC applications if applicable. This AD results from failure of the 
safety fittings for the cargo fire extinguishing bottles. We are 
issuing this AD to prevent failure of the safety fittings for the cargo 
fire extinguishing bottles due to corrosion, which could result in 
leakage of extinguishing agent. If a fire occurs in the cargo bay, the 
cargo fire extinguishing bottles could have less than enough 
extinguishing agent to control a fire.

DATES: This AD becomes effective September 27, 2006.
    The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by 
reference of certain publications listed in the AD as of September 27, 
2006.

ADDRESSES: You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://
dms.dot.gov or in person at the Docket Management Facility, U.S. 
Department of Transportation, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Nassif Building, 
Room PL-401, Washington, DC.
    Contact Boeing Commercial Airplanes, P.O. Box 3707, Seattle, 
Washington 98124-2207, for service information identified in this AD.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Barbara Mudrovich, Aerospace Engineer, 
Cabin Safety and Environmental Systems Branch, ANM-150S, FAA, Seattle 
Aircraft Certification Office, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, 
Washington 98057-3356; telephone (425) 917-6477; fax (425) 917-6590.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Examining the Docket

    You may examine the airworthiness directive (AD) docket on the 
Internet at http://dms.dot.gov or in person at the Docket Management 
Facility office between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, 
except Federal holidays. The Docket Management Facility office 
(telephone (800) 647-5227) is located on the plaza level of the Nassif 
Building at the street address stated in the ADDRESSES section.

Discussion

    The FAA issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 
CFR part 39 to include an AD that would apply to certain Boeing Model 
767-400ER series airplanes and Model 777-200 and -300 series airplanes. 
That NPRM was published in the Federal Register on July 5, 2005 (70 FR 
38632). That NPRM proposed to require, for certain airplanes, 
repetitive testing of the fill and safety fittings of the fire 
extinguishing bottles in the forward cargo compartment for leaks; and 
repetitive application of a corrosion inhibiting compound (CIC) or 
replacement of the fire extinguishing bottles with reworked fire 
extinguishing bottles, as necessary. That NPRM also proposed to 
require, for all airplanes, replacement of the fire extinguishing 
bottles with reworked fire extinguishing bottles, which would end the 
repetitive tests and CIC applications if applicable.

Actions Since NPRM Was Issued

    Since we issued the NPRM, Boeing has published Special Attention 
Service Bulletin 767-26-0124, Revision 1, dated April 13, 2006. We 
referenced the original issue of that service bulletin, dated December 
5, 2002, in the NPRM as the appropriate source of service information 
for testing the cargo fire extinguishing bottles on Model 767-400ER 
series airplanes. The procedures in Revision 1 of the service bulletin 
are essentially the same as those in the original issue. Revision 1 
corrects a reference to the Boeing 767 Aircraft Maintenance Manual 
(AMM), which we noted as a difference in the NPRM. Therefore, we have 
revised this AD to reference Revision 1 of the service bulletin as the 
appropriate source of service information for testing the cargo fire 
extinguishing bottles on Model 767-400ER series airplanes. We have also 
added a new paragraph (k) to this AD, giving credit for testing done 
before the effective date of this AD in accordance with the original 
issue of the service bulletin. We have reidentified the subsequent 
paragraphs accordingly.

Comments

    We provided the public the opportunity to participate in the 
development of this AD. We have considered the comments received.

Request for Credit for Additional Model Airplanes

    Boeing requests that we revise paragraph (j) of the NPRM to include 
Model 767-400ER series airplanes and Model 777-300 series airplanes. 
(The NPRM provided credit only for Model 777-200 series airplanes.) As 
justification, Boeing states that this change will provide credit for 
all three affected model airplanes, not just the Model 777-200 series 
airplanes. We infer Boeing would like credit for accomplishment of 
Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 767-26-0124, dated December 
5, 2002, for Model 767-400ER series airplanes; and Boeing Special 
Attention Service Bulletin 777-26-0034, dated January 22, 2004, for 
Model 777-300 series airplanes.
    We agree to provide credit for all Model 767-400ER series 
airplanes. As stated previously, we have given credit to Model 767-
400ER series airplanes in paragraph (k) of this AD.
    We agree only to provide credit for certain Model 777-300 series 
airplanes. Certain Model 777-300 series airplanes were misidentified as 
Group 1 airplanes in the original issue of Boeing Special Attention 
Service Bulletin 777-26-0034. Revision 1 of Boeing Service Bulletin 
777-26-0034, dated July 1, 2004, states that more work is necessary on 
Model 777-300 series airplanes if the Group 1 instructions of the 
original service bulletin were accomplished on those airplanes. 
However, no additional work is necessary for Model 777-300 series 
airplanes if the Group 2 instructions of the original service bulletin 
were accomplished on those airplanes. Therefore, we have revised 
paragraph (j) of this AD to give credit only for Model 777-300 series 
airplanes identified as Group 2 in the original issue of the service 
bulletin. Under the provisions of paragraph (l) of this AD, we may 
consider requests for approval of an alternative method of compliance 
(AMOC) if sufficient data are submitted to substantiate that such a 
method

[[Page 49329]]

would provide an acceptable level of safety.

Request To Clarify the Affected Fire Extinguishing Bottles

    Boeing requests that we specifically refer to ``cargo'' fire 
extinguishing bottles in the NPRM. As justification, Boeing states that 
this will avoid confusion with the fire extinguishing bottles for the 
engine/auxiliary power unit. We agree and have revised all references 
accordingly in this AD.

Request To Revise Terminology

    Boeing states that the safety disc inside the fill fitting is 
referred to as ``fill and safety fittings,'' ``safety fittings,'' or 
``burst disc inside the safety fitting'' in several paragraphs in the 
NPRM. Boeing requests that we revise the NPRM to use its preferred 
terminology of ``safety disc inside the fill fitting.''
    We agree and have revised the terminology in paragraph (g)(1) of 
this AD. We point out that we used the term ``burst disc inside the 
safety filling'' in the NPRM to match the terminology used in the 
referenced Boeing and Kidde Aerospace service bulletins for replacing 
the cargo fire extinguishing bottles. We have continued using the term 
``fill and safety fittings'' in paragraph (g) of this AD as it is 
specified in the applicable Kidde Aerospace service bulletins.

Request To Revise Model Designation

    Boeing also requests that we fix the typographical error for the 
model designation in the first row of the Estimated Costs table of the 
NPRM. Boeing states the correct model designation is Model 767-400ER. 
We agree and have revised the Estimated Costs table in this AD 
accordingly.

Request To Revise ``Discussion'' Section

    Boeing also requests that we revise the first sentence of the first 
paragraph in the Discussion section of the NPRM as follows:

    We have received a report indicating that failed safety fittings 
of the fire extinguishing bottles located in the forward lower lobe. 
* * *.
    The commenter also requests that we change the second paragraph of 
the Discussion section to the following:

    The cargo fire extinguishing bottles installed on Model 767-
400ER series airplanes are identical to metered cargo fire bottles 
on the 777-300 series airplanes. Therefore, all of these models are 
subject to the same unsafe condition.

    As justification for the second part of its request, Boeing states 
that all the cargo fire extinguishing bottles installed on Model 767-
400ER series airplanes are identical to one of the bottles that is 
installed on Model 777-300 series airplanes, but not installed on Model 
777-200 series airplanes.
    We agree with Boeing's statements. However, the Discussion section 
of an NPRM is not restated in the AD. Therefore, no change to this AD 
is necessary in this regard.

Request To Identify the Affected Cargo Fire Extinguishing Bottles

    The Modification and Repair Parts Association (MARPA) requests that 
we include sufficient information to specify the precise applicability 
of the NPRM. MARPA states that the NPRM relies on certain Boeing and 
Kidde Aerospace service bulletins that were not incorporated by 
reference when the NPRM was published in the Federal Register. Since 
these service bulletins are copyrighted material, MARPA states it 
cannot determine the precise applicability of the NPRM. We infer the 
commenter would like us to identify the affected cargo fire 
extinguishing bottles in this AD.
    We do not agree to specify the affected part numbers in this AD. It 
is our general practice to reference the appropriate service 
information, since the affected part numbers are clearly specified in 
that referenced information. Not only does it appear redundant to 
repeat those part numbers in this AD, but if there was a large number 
of parts involved, it would increase the risk of error in repeating 
those part numbers in this AD. However, we are currently in the process 
of reviewing issues surrounding the posting of service bulletins on the 
Department of Transportation's Docket Management System (DMS) as part 
of an AD docket. Once we have thoroughly examined all aspects of this 
issue and have made a final determination, we will consider whether our 
current practice needs to be revised. However, we consider that to 
delay this AD action would be inappropriate, since we have determined 
that an unsafe condition exists and that replacement of certain parts 
must be accomplished to ensure continued safety. Therefore, no change 
has been made to this AD in this regard.

Request To Reference Parts Manufacturer Approval (PMA) Parts

    MARPA also requests that we add language to the NPRM to account for 
the possible existence of alternative PMA equivalent parts. MARPA 
states that, under 14 CFR 21.303, there may be PMA parts that should 
also be affected by the NPRM. As justification, MARPA states that some 
PMA parts appear to be similar to the affected parts addressed in the 
NPRM, and that further research should be conducted to ensure that all 
affected parts are included in the NPRM. MARPA further states that 
there may also be PMA parts equivalent to the ``new and improved'' 
replacement parts specified in the NPRM.
    We concur with MARPA's general request that, if we know that an 
unsafe condition also exists in PMA parts, the AD should address those 
parts, as well as the original parts. At this time, we are not aware of 
other PMA parts equivalent to the affected cargo fire extinguishing 
bottles.
    Furthermore, we infer that MARPA would like the AD to permit 
installation of any equivalent PMA parts so that it is not necessary 
for an operator to request approval of an AMOC in order to install an 
``equivalent'' PMA part. Whether an alternative part is ``equivalent'' 
in adequately resolving the unsafe condition can only be determined on 
a case-by-case basis, based on a complete understanding of the unsafe 
condition. We are not currently aware of any such parts. Our policy is 
that, in order for operators to replace a part with one that is not 
specified in the AD, they must request an AMOC. This is necessary so 
that we can make a specific determination that an alternative part is 
or is not susceptible to the same unsafe condition.
    MARPA's remarks are timely in that the Transport Airplane 
Directorate currently is in the process of reviewing this issue as it 
applies to transport category airplanes. We acknowledge that there may 
be other ways of addressing this issue to ensure that unsafe PMA parts 
are identified and addressed. Once we have thoroughly examined all 
aspects of this issue, including input from industry, and have made a 
final determination, we will consider whether our policy regarding 
addressing PMA parts in ADs needs to be revised. We consider that to 
delay this AD action would be inappropriate, since we have determined 
that an unsafe condition exists and that replacement of certain parts 
must be accomplished to ensure continued safety. Therefore, no change 
has been made to this AD in this regard.

Request To Delete Difference Paragraph

    Boeing states that it intends to publish Revision 1 to Boeing 
Special Attention Service Bulletin 767-26-0124 to correct the reference 
to the AMM, which we identified as a difference in the NPRM. Boeing 
also states that Revision 1 is currently being routed for approval. We 
infer the commenter would like us to

[[Page 49330]]

delete the difference paragraph. We disagree, since the difference 
paragraph is not restated in this AD. Since we have already revised 
this AD to reference Revision 1 of the service bulletin, as described 
previously, no additional change to this AD is necessary.

Request To Revise the Costs of Compliance Paragraph

    American Airlines states that the total cost for testing the cargo 
fire extinguishing bottles as specified in Boeing Special Attention 
Service Bulletin 777-26-0033, dated December 5, 2002, is $5,460, per 
test cycle. The commenter also states that the total cost for replacing 
the cargo fire extinguishing bottles as specified in Boeing Service 
Bulletin 777-26-0034, Revision 1, dated July 1, 2004, is $287,573. We 
infer that American Airlines would like us to revise the Costs of 
Compliance paragraph.
    We disagree. The cost information in an AD describes only the 
direct costs of the specific actions required by the AD. Based on the 
best data available, the manufacturer provided the number of work hours 
necessary to do the required actions. This number represents the time 
necessary to perform only the actions actually required by this AD. We 
recognize that, in doing the actions required by an AD, operators may 
incur incidental costs in addition to the direct costs. The cost 
analysis in AD rulemaking actions, however, typically does not include 
incidental costs such as the time required to gain access and close up, 
time necessary for planning, or time necessitated by other 
administrative actions. Those incidental costs, which may vary 
significantly among operators, are almost impossible to calculate. 
Therefore, no change has been made to this AD in this regard.

Clarification of AMOC Paragraph

    We have revised this action to clarify the appropriate procedure 
for notifying the principal inspector before using any approved AMOC on 
any airplane to which the AMOC applies.

Conclusion

    We have carefully reviewed the available data, including the 
comments received, and determined that air safety and the public 
interest require adopting the AD with the changes described previously. 
We have determined that these changes will neither increase the 
economic burden on any operator nor increase the scope of the AD.

Costs of Compliance

    There are about 322 airplanes of the affected design in the 
worldwide fleet. This AD affects about 167 airplanes of U.S. registry. 
The following table provides the estimated costs, at an average labor 
rate of $65 per hour, for U.S. operators to comply with this AD.

                                                                     Estimated Costs
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                      Number of
                                                              Work                                                      U.S.-
             Airplanes                       Action           hours           Parts            Cost per airplane     registered         Fleet cost
                                                                                                                      airplanes
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Model 767-400ER series airplanes     Leak test, per test           4  None.................  $260, per test cycle.            36  $9,360, per test
 (for all 4 cargo fire                cycle.                                                                                       cycle.
 extinguishing bottles).
                                     Replacement..........         8  $2,800...............  $3,320...............            36  $119,520.
Model 777-200 and -300 series        Leak test, per test           5  None.................  $325, per test cycle.           130  $42,250, per test
 airplanes (for all 5 cargo fire      cycle.                                                                                       cycle.
 extinguishing bottles).
                                     Replacement..........        10  $3,400...............  $4,050...............           131  $530,550.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Authority for This Rulemaking

    Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to 
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, Section 106, describes the 
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, 
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
    We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in 
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701, ``General 
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with 
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing 
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator 
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within 
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition 
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this 
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

    We have determined that this AD will not have federalism 
implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a 
substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between 
the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power 
and responsibilities among the various levels of government.
    For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD:
    (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive 
Order 12866;
    (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and 
Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and
    (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or 
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria 
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.
    We prepared a regulatory evaluation of the estimated costs to 
comply with this AD and placed it in the AD docket. See the ADDRESSES 
section for a location to examine the regulatory evaluation.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

    Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by 
reference, Safety.

Adoption of the Amendment

0
Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, 
the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

    Authority : 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13  [Amended]

0
2. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) amends Sec.  39.13 by 
adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD):

2006-17-11 Boeing: Amendment 39-14732. Docket No. FAA-2005-21713; 
Directorate Identifier 2005-NM-085-AD.

[[Page 49331]]

Effective Date

    (a) This AD becomes effective September 27, 2006.

Affected ADs

    (b) None.

Applicability

    (c) This AD applies to the airplanes listed in Table 1 of this 
AD, certificated in any category:

                         Table 1.--Applicability
------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Boeing Model--                     As Identified in--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
767-400ER series airplanes................  Boeing Special Attention
                                             Service Bulletin 767-26-
                                             0125, dated January 22,
                                             2004.
777-200 and -300 series airplanes.........  Boeing Service Bulletin 777-
                                             26-0034, Revision 1, dated
                                             July 1, 2004.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Unsafe Condition

    (d) This AD was prompted by failure of the safety fittings for 
the cargo fire extinguishing bottles. We are issuing this AD to 
prevent failure of the safety fittings for the cargo fire 
extinguishing bottles due to corrosion, which could result in 
leakage of extinguishing agent. If a fire occurs in the cargo bay, 
the cargo fire extinguishing bottles could have less than enough 
extinguishing agent to control a fire.

Compliance

    (e) You are responsible for having the actions required by this 
AD performed within the compliance times specified, unless the 
actions have already been done.

Service Bulletin References

    (f) The term ``service bulletin,'' as used in this AD, means the 
Accomplishment Instructions of the service bulletins identified in 
Table 2 of this AD, as applicable:

                                      Table 2.--Service Bulletin References
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
             For model--                        Boeing--                              For the--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
767-400ER series airplanes..........  Special Attention Service     Test specified in paragraph (g) of this AD.
                                       Bulletin 767-26-0124,
                                       Revision 1, dated April 13,
                                       2006.
                                      Special Attention Service     Replacement specified in paragraph (h) of
                                       Bulletin 767-26-0125, dated   this AD.
                                       January 22, 2004.
777-200 and -300 series airplanes...  Special Attention Service     Test specified in paragraph (g) of this AD.
                                       Bulletin 777-26-0033, dated
                                       December 5, 2002.
                                      Service Bulletin 777-26-      Replacement specified in paragraph (h) of
                                       0034, Revision 1, dated       this AD.
                                       July 1, 2004.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Repetitive Testing of Cargo Fire Extinguishing Bottles

    (g) For all Model 767-400ER series airplanes; and the Model 777-
200 and -300 series airplanes identified in Boeing Special Attention 
Service Bulletin 777-26-0033, dated December 5, 2002: Within 18 
months or 6,000 flight hours after the effective date of this AD, 
whichever is first, test the fill and safety fittings of the cargo 
fire extinguishing bottles in the forward cargo compartment for 
leaks, in accordance with the applicable service bulletin. Repeat 
the test thereafter at intervals not to exceed 18 months or 6,000 
flight hours, whichever is first, in accordance with the service 
bulletin, until the replacement required by paragraph (h) of this AD 
is accomplished.
    (1) If no leak is found or if the leak rate is below the 
calibrated rate specified in the service bulletin, before further 
flight, apply the corrosion inhibiting compound (CIC) to the safety 
disc inside the fill fitting and reidentify the cargo fire 
extinguishing bottle, in accordance with the applicable service 
bulletin.
    (2) If any leak above the calibrated rate specified in the 
service bulletin is found, before further flight, replace and 
reidentify the cargo fire extinguishing bottle with new or reworked 
fire extinguishing bottles, in accordance with the applicable 
service bulletin; except where the service bulletin specifies that 
the replacement may be accomplished according to an operator's 
``equivalent procedure,'' replace in accordance with a method 
approved by the Manager, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office 
(ACO), FAA. Chapter 26-23-02/401 of the Boeing 767 Aircraft 
Maintenance Manual (AMM) or Chapter 26-23-01/401 of the Boeing 777 
AMM, as applicable, is one approved method.

    Note 1: The Boeing service bulletins listed in Table 3 of this 
AD refer to certain Kidde Aerospace service bulletins, as 
applicable, as additional sources of service information for testing 
and reidentifying the cargo fire extinguishing bottles.


                              Table 3.--Additional Service Information for Testing
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                           Boeing Special Attention         Refers to Kidde Aerospace Service
              For model--                     Service Bulletin--                       Bulletin--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
767-400ER series airplanes............  767-26-0124, Revision 1, dated  473876-26-454. Revision 1, dated March
                                         April 13, 2006.                 12, 2003, is the latest version of this
                                                                         service bulletin.
777-200 and -300 series airplanes.....  777-26-0033, dated December 5,  473474-26-442. Revision 1, dated March
                                         2002                            12, 2003, is the latest version of this
                                                                         service bulletin.
                                                                        473475-26-443. Revision 1, dated March
                                                                         12, 2003, is the latest version of this
                                                                         service bulletin.
                                                                        473854-26-444. Revision 1, dated March
                                                                         12, 2003, is the latest version of this
                                                                         service bulletin.
                                                                        473876-26-445. Revision 1, dated March
                                                                         12, 2003, is the latest version of this
                                                                         service bulletin.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Replacement of Cargo Fire Extinguishing Bottles

    (h) For all airplanes: Within 60 months after the effective date 
of this AD, replace the existing cargo fire extinguishing bottles 
with reworked fire extinguishing bottles, in accordance with the 
applicable service bulletin. Replacement of a cargo fire 
extinguishing bottle with a reworked fire extinguishing bottle 
terminates the repetitive tests and CIC applications required by 
paragraph (g) of this AD for that fire extinguishing bottle only.

    Note 2: The Boeing service bulletins listed in Table 4 of this 
AD refer to certain Kidde Aerospace service bulletins, as 
applicable, as additional sources of service information for 
reworking the cargo fire extinguishing bottles.


[[Page 49332]]



        Table 4.--Additional Service Information for Replacement
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                       Refers to Kidde
         For model--                Boeing--          Aerospace Service
                                                         Bulletin--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
767-400ER series airplanes..  Special Attention     473876-26-453, dated
                               Service Bulletin      January 22, 2004.
                               767-26-0125, dated
                               January 22, 2004
777-200 and -300 series       Service Bulletin 777- 473474-26-450, dated
 airplanes.                    26-0034, Revision     January 22, 2004.
                               1, dated July 1,
                               2004.
                                                    473475-26-451, dated
                                                     January 22, 2004.
                                                    473854-26-452, dated
                                                     January 22, 2004.
                                                    473876-26-453, dated
                                                     January 22, 2004.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Parts Installation

    (i) For all airplanes: As of the effective date of this AD, no 
person may install a cargo fire extinguishing bottle, part numbers 
(P/Ns) 473474-1 and -2, P/Ns 473475-1 and -2, P/Ns 473854-1 and -2, 
or P/Ns 473876-1 and -2, on any airplane, unless the initial test 
required by paragraph (g) of this AD is accomplished.

Credit for Previous Service Bulletins

    (j) For all Model 777-200 series airplanes; and Model 777-300 
series airplanes identified as Group 2 in Boeing Special Attention 
Service Bulletin 777-26-0034, dated January 22, 2004: Actions done 
before the effective date of this AD in accordance with Boeing 
Special Attention Service Bulletin 777-26-0034, dated January 22, 
2004, are acceptable for compliance with the corresponding 
requirements of this AD.
    (k) For all Model 767-400ER series airplanes: Actions done 
before the effective date of this AD in accordance with Boeing 
Special Attention Service Bulletin 767-26-0124, dated December 5, 
2002, are acceptable for compliance with the corresponding 
requirements of this AD.

Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs)

    (l)(1) The Manager, Seattle ACO, FAA, has the authority to 
approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested in accordance with the 
procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19.
    (2) Before using any AMOC approved in accordance with 14 CFR 
39.19 on any airplane to which the AMOC applies, notify the 
appropriate principal inspector in the FAA Flight Standards 
Certificate Holding District Office.

Material Incorporated by Reference

    (m) You must use the service information in Table 5 of this AD 
to perform the actions that are required by this AD, unless the AD 
specifies otherwise. The Director of the Federal Register approved 
the incorporation by reference of these documents in accordance with 
5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Contact Boeing Commercial 
Airplanes, P.O. Box 3707, Seattle, Washington 98124-2207, for a copy 
of this service information. You may review copies at the Docket 
Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 400 Seventh 
Street, SW., Room PL-401, Nassif Building, Washington, DC; on the 
Internet at http://dms.dot.gov; or at the National Archives and 
Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability 
of this material at the NARA, call (202) 741-6030, or go to http://
www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/
ibr_locations.html.

                                  Table 5.--Material Incorporated by Reference
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
             Service Bulletin                     Revision level                           Date
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Boeing Service Bulletin 777-26-0034......  1...........................  July 1, 2004.
Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin  1...........................  April 13, 2006.
 767-26-0124.
Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin  Original....................  January 22, 2004.
 767-26-0125.
Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin  Original....................  December 5, 2002.
 777-26-0033.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Issued in Renton, Washington, on August 10, 2006.
Kalene C. Yanamura,
Acting Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification 
Service.
 [FR Doc. E6-13825 Filed 8-22-06; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P