Special Awareness Training for the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area, 38118-38125 [06-5997]

Download as PDF 38118 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 128 / Wednesday, July 5, 2006 / Proposed Rules A 10-day comment period is provided to allow interested persons to respond to this proposal. Ten days is deemed appropriate because: (1) The 2006–07 fiscal period began on March 1, 2006, and the marketing order requires that the rate of assessment for each fiscal period apply to all assessable nectarines and peaches handled during such fiscal period; (2) the committees need to have sufficient funds to pay their expenses, which are incurred on a continuous basis; and (3) handlers are aware of this action, which was discussed by the committees at public meetings and recommended at their meetings on April 27, 2006, and is similar to other assessment rate actions issued in past years. List of Subjects 7 CFR Part 916 Marketing agreements, Nectarines, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. 7 CFR Part 917 Marketing agreements, Peaches, Pears, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. For the reasons set forth in the preamble, 7 CFR parts 916 and 917 are proposed to be amended as follows: 1. The authority citation for 7 CFR parts 916 and 917 continues to read as follows: Authority: 7 U.S.C. 601–674. PART 916—NECTARINES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA 2. Section 916.234 is revised to read as follows: § 916.234 Assessment rate. On and after March 1, 2006, an assessment rate of $0.21 per 25-pound container or container equivalent of nectarines is established for California nectarines. PART 917—PEACHES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA 3. Section 917.258 is revised to read as follows: § 917.258 Assessment rate. wwhite on PROD1PC61 with PROPOSALS On and after March 1, 2006, an assessment rate of $0.21 per 25-pound container or container equivalent of peaches is established for California peaches. Dated: June 28, 2006. Lloyd C. Day, Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service. [FR Doc. E6–10425 Filed 7–3–06;8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–02–P VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:27 Jul 03, 2006 Jkt 208001 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 91 [Docket No. FAA–2006–25250; Notice No. 06–08] RIN 2120–AI63 Special Awareness Training for the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). AGENCY: SUMMARY: This proposed rule would require special awareness training for any person who flies under visual flight rules (VFR) within 100 nautical miles of the Washington, DC VHF omnidirectional range/distance measuring equipment (DCA VOR/DME). This training program is provided by the FAA on its Web site and focuses primarily on training pilots on the procedures for flying in and around the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) and the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area Flight Restricted Zone (FRZ). The intended effect of this proposed rule is to reduce the number of unauthorized flights into the airspace of the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ through education of the pilot community. DATES: Comments must be received on or before September 5, 2006. See the note in the ‘‘Comments Invited’’ section under SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. ADDRESSES: You may send comments identified by docket number using any of the following methods: • DOT Docket Web site: Go to http://dms.dot.gov and follow the instructions for sending your comments electronically. • Mail: Docket Management Facility; U.S. Department of Transportation, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Nassif Building, Room PL–401, Washington, DC 20590– 0001. • Fax: 1–202–493–2251. • Hand Delivery: Room PL–401 on the plaza level of the Nassif Building, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. For more information on the rulemaking process, see the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of this document. Privacy: We will post all comments we receive, without change, to http:// dms.dot.gov, including any personal information you provide. For more PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 information, see the Privacy Act discussion in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of this document. Docket: To read background documents or comments received, go to http://dms.dot.gov at any time or to Room PL–401 on the plaza level of the Nassif Building, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John D. Lynch, Certification and General Aviation Operations Branch, AFS–810, General Aviation and Commercial Division, Flight Standards Service, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591; telephone: (202) 267–3844 or (202) 267–8212; e-mail address: john.d.lynch@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Comments Invited Note: On August 4, 2005, the FAA proposed to codify current flight restrictions for certain aircraft operations in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area (70 FR 45250; Aug. 4, 2005). The comment period for that proposed rule closed on February 6, 2006. Today’s NPRM is a separate action that would require special awareness training for any person who flies under visual flight rules (VFR) within 100 nautical miles of the Washington, DC VHF omni-directional range/ distance measuring equipment (DCA VOR/ DME). If the FAA receives comments on the August 4, 2005, proposal in response to this special awareness training NPRM, those comments will be treated as outside the scope of this rulemaking. The FAA invites interested persons to participate in this proposed rulemaking by submitting written comments, data, or views. We also invite comments relating to the economic, environmental, energy, or Federalism impacts that might result from adopting as final the requirements in this interim rule. The most helpful comments reference a specific portion of the rule, explain the reason for any recommended change, and include supporting data. We ask that you send us two copies of written comments. We will file in the docket all comments we receive, as well as a report summarizing each substantive public contact with FAA personnel concerning this interim rulemaking. The docket is available for public inspection before and after the comment closing date. If you wish to review the docket in person, go to the address in the ADDRESSES section of this preamble between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. You may also review the docket using E:\FR\FM\05JYP1.SGM 05JYP1 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 128 / Wednesday, July 5, 2006 / Proposed Rules the Internet at the Web address in the ADDRESSES section. Privacy Act: Using the search function of our docket Web site, anyone can find and read the comments received into any of our dockets, including the name of the individual sending the comment (or signing the comment on behalf of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review DOT’s complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register of April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477–78) or you may visit http:// dms.dot.gov. Before acting on this proposal, we will consider all comments we receive on or before the closing date for comments. We will consider comments filed late if it is possible to do so without incurring expense or delay. We may change this proposed rule in light of the comments we receive. If you want the FAA to acknowledge receipt of your comments on this proposed rule, include with your comments a pre-addressed, stamped postcard on which the docket number appears. We will stamp the date on the postcard and mail it to you. wwhite on PROD1PC61 with PROPOSALS Availability of Rulemaking Documents You can get an electronic copy using the Internet by: (1) Searching the Department of Transportation’s electronic Docket Management System (DMS) Web page (http://dms.dot.gov/search); (2) Visiting the FAA’s Regulations and Policies Web page at http:// www.faa.gov/regulations_policies; or (3) Accessing the Government Printing Office’s Web page at http:// www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/. You can also get a copy by sending a request to the Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Rulemaking, ARM–1, 800 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20591, or by calling (202) 267–9680. Make sure to identify the docket number, notice number, or amendment number of this rulemaking. Authority for This Rulemaking The Department of Transportation (DOT) has the responsibility, under the laws of the United States, to develop transportation policies and programs that contribute to providing fast, safe, efficient, and convenient transportation (49 U.S.C. 101). The FAA is an agency of DOT. The Administrator of the FAA has broad authority to regulate the safe and efficient use of the navigable airspace (49 U.S.C. 40103). The Administrator also is authorized to issue air traffic rules and regulations to govern the flight of aircraft, the navigation, protection and identification of aircraft for the protection of persons VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:27 Jul 03, 2006 Jkt 208001 and property on the ground, and for the efficient use of navigable airspace. Additionally, pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 40103(b)(3) the Administrator has the authority, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, to ‘‘establish security provisions that will encourage and allow maximum use of the navigable airspace by civil aircraft consistent with national security.’’ Background In February 2003, the FAA, in consultation with the Department of Homeland Security and other Federal agencies, implemented a system of airspace control measures to protect against a potential threat to the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area. The dimensions of this protected airspace were determined after considering such factors as the speed of likely suspect aircraft, minimum launch time and the speed of intercept aircraft. After extensive coordination among Federal agencies, two airspace areas were implemented. The outer area, which closely mimics the current Washington Tri-area Class B airspace, is called an Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) and requires identification of all flight operations within the airspace in order to ensure the security of protected ground assets. The inner and critical security area, called a Flight Restricted Zone (FRZ) is an approximate 15nautical mile radius around the Washington VHF omni-directional range/distance measuring equipment (DCA VOR/DME) (38–51–07.512N/077– 02–15.763W) where more stringent access procedures apply. The Washington, DC Metropolitan Area FRZ is part of the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ. Since its creation, there have been over 1,000 unauthorized flights (i.e., incursions) within the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ. A few of these flights came so close to the Capitol and the White House that evacuation of these buildings and other Federal office buildings was required. Although all of the incursions were eventually determined to be inadvertent in nature, each incursion places an unnecessary burden on Federal, State, and local law enforcement resources. For instance, when an unauthorized aircraft penetrates restricted airspace, the FAA’s air traffic controllers must divert necessary resources to monitor the aircraft’s flight, alert security operations, and communicate information about the aircraft to appropriate military and law enforcement agencies. Several branches of the Federal Government, military and local law enforcement are forced to respond to the situation and needlessly PO 00000 Frm 00005 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 38119 expend effort in a situation that ultimately is determined not to have been a threat to our national security. The FAA is very concerned about these incursions. Recently, there have been several incidents where civilian aircraft have been intercepted by U.S. Customs Service helicopters and U.S. Air Force fighter airplanes for inadvertent flights within Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ. In addition to the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ, other Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) areas have been established and continue to be established over certain cities and sensitive sites throughout the country. And, like the DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ, there have been inadvertent incursions into TFR airspace. The training required under this rulemaking will include information on not only the restricted airspace in the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area, but also restricted airspace throughout the country. In future FAA initiatives, we intend to increase all U.S. registered airmen’s awareness and knowledge in flight operations and procedures in and around restricted airspace through modifying the content of our practical test standards, flight reviews, pilot proficiency checks, flight instructor renewals, and instrument proficiency checks. Discussion of This Proposed Rule The FAA is proposing to amend 14 CFR part 91 by adding a new § 91.161. Under the proposed rule, prior to flying Visual Flight Rules (VFR) within a radius of 100 nautical miles of the DCA VOR/DME, a pilot must have completed the Special Awareness Training for the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area. The FAA would require compliance 180 days from publication of the final rule. The training, which is currently available online through the FAA Safety website, focuses on how to avoid or operate safely within the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ, Washington, DC Metropolitan Area FRZ, and special use/restricted airspace. We believe that through training, the number of inadvertent incursions into the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ could be reduced. According to the United States Government Accountability Office’s (GAO) testimony before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Government Reform (‘‘Agency Resources Address Violations of Restricted Airspace, but Management Improvements are Needed’’), ‘‘general aviation aircraft pilots accounted for about 88% of all violations of restricted U.S. airspace between September 12, E:\FR\FM\05JYP1.SGM 05JYP1 38120 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 128 / Wednesday, July 5, 2006 / Proposed Rules 2001 and December 31, 2004.’’ In addition, GAO noted, ‘‘pilot error is the biggest contributor to restricted airspace violations.’’ Thus, to reduce the number of violations, we are proposing mandatory training to make pilots more aware of the location of restricted airspace and the procedures that must be followed to either avoid or operate in those areas. wwhite on PROD1PC61 with PROPOSALS Who Would Be Required to Receive This Training? Any person who flies an aircraft under VFR within a radius of 100 nautical miles of the DCA VOR/DME would be required to receive the special awareness training required under § 91.161. Thus, this proposed rule would apply to any person operating an aircraft under VFR within a 100-nautical mile radius of the DCA VOR/DME, including all operations conducted under 14 CFR part 91, those for which an air carrier or an operating certificate may be issued under 14 CFR part 119 (for operations conducted under 14 CFR part 121 or 135), and those which may be conducted under part 125, 129, 133 or 137. Further, regardless of the type of pilot certificate held (e.g., sport, recreational, student, private, commercial or foreign) or where the flight originated (e.g., Virginia, California or even Canada), a person would be subject to the training requirement as a pre-condition to flying under VFR within 100 nautical miles of the DCA VOR/DME. Note this special awareness training would not be required for pilots who operate under instrument flight rules (IFR) within a 100-nautical mile radius of the DCA VOR/DME. As previously noted, there have been over 1,000 unauthorized flights into the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ since February 2003. To date, no criminal charges have been filed against any pilot. Of all the cases investigated, only one incursion was deemed deliberate. This led to the revocation of the pilot’s certificate. We believe that the other incursions are a direct result VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:27 Jul 03, 2006 Jkt 208001 of general aviation pilots under VFR flying off-course and not recognizing that they had entered restricted airspace without following proper procedure. Pilots, on the other hand, who fly under IFR are under the control of the FAA’s Air Traffic Control system and, therefore, are under a controlled flight plan and routing that either allows them to enter the restricted airspace or avoid the airspace. Thus, at this time, we do not believe that requiring pilots who would fly under IFR within or near Washington, DC Metropolitan Area restricted airspace will address our immediate concern of reducing the number of inadvertent incursions into the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ. The proposed rule consequently only would apply to persons flying aircraft under VFR within a 100-nautical mile radius of the DCA VOR/DME. Would There Be Any Operations Excluded From the Requirements Under § 91.161? Yes. We recognize there are certain operations that must be handled differently because of their importance to national security and safety and for the public interest. Historically, we have provided special consideration for operations by the U.S. Department of Defense/U.S. military and law enforcement and for approved aeromedical flights. The flight restrictions for the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ specifically exempt these types of operations from certain requirements otherwise applicable to aircraft entering the ADIZ and FRZ (see NOTAM FDC 3/ 2126). Furthermore, to our knowledge, none of the inadvertent incursions into the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ has involved pilots conducting such operations. Consequently, under § 91.161(e), the FAA would exempt a person flying an aircraft in a U.S. Department of Defense/U.S. military or law enforcement operation, or for approved aeromedical assistance from the training requirements. This PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 exclusion, however, only would apply if the person is flying on an official U.S. Department of Defense/U.S. military, law enforcement, or approved aeromedical operation. If the military pilot, law enforcement pilot, or aeromedical pilot exercised private pilot privileges under VFR within 100 nautical miles of the DCA VOR/DME, this special awareness training (under § 91.161) would be required. Why Was the Distance of a ‘‘100 Nautical Miles Radius’’ of the DCA VOR/DME Selected? After reviewing extensive data, we believe that only pilots flying within a 100-nautical mile radius of the DCA VOR/DME under VFR should be subject to the training requirement. Based on the statistics compiled, we determined that the majority of pilots who inadvertently entered the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ had either originated their flight within this 100nautical mile radius or their last point of departure was within this 100nautical mile radius. Several alternatives were considered for who should complete the training, including subjecting only—(1) pilots residing in Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, West Virginia and the District of Columbia; (2) pilots flying VFR over Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, West Virginia and the District of Columbia; or (3) pilots that fly VFR within a 250 nautical mile radius of the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ. We, however, believe that each of these alternatives is either overly broad or unduly complex. The airspace 100 nautical miles from the DCA VOR/DME would not appear on the Washington, DC sectional aeronautical chart. Pilots, however, could easily plot the ‘‘training zone’’ on the appropriate sectional map(s) on their own. See Diagram 1. Further, we would provide a map that you could print through the FAA Safety Web site (http://www.faasafety.gov) for this course. E:\FR\FM\05JYP1.SGM 05JYP1 Would This Training Apply to Me if I Intended To Fly IFR but Cancelled My IFR Clearance and Proceeded VFR? We recognize there may be instances when a pilot operating under IFR must cancel an IFR clearance and continue the flight under VFR. For example, a pilot may be flying under IFR within the 100-nautical mile radius of the DCA VOR/DME, but due to radio or instrument equipment problems, must cancel IFR clearance and proceed under VFR. Under that scenario, the failure to complete the special awareness-training program required under proposed § 91.161would not be a violation of the federal regulations. Additionally, in an in-flight emergency situation, the pilot in command could deviate from any rule under part 91 to the extent necessary to meet that emergency. See 14 CFR 91.3(b). The FAA, however, may investigate the situation and request that the pilot provide a written explanation for the deviation. In contrast, if a pilot of his or her own volition cancelled the IFR clearance while operating within the 100-nautical mile radius of the DCA VOR/DME and VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:27 Jul 03, 2006 Jkt 208001 proceeded VFR, then the requirements under § 91.161 would apply. When Would I Have To Comply? After a compliance date 180 days from effective date of the final rule, any person that flew within 100 nautical miles of the DCA VOR/DME under VFR would have to comply with the requirements of 14 CFR 91.161. We believe 180 days would be sufficient time for affected persons to complete the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area special awareness training program. How Often Would This Training Be Required? The proposed Washington, DC Metropolitan Area special awareness training would be a ‘‘one-time’’ obligation. Specifically, if this rule applied to you, you would only have to accomplish the special training course one time. However, we would encourage you to repeat the training when you feel you need to refresh your knowledge. In future initiatives we intend to ensure that all pilots receive recurrent training on flight procedures PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 38121 for operating in prohibited and restricted airspace, including the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ. We expect to accomplish this future training through additional training and testing during practical tests, flight reviews, pilot proficiency checks, flight instructor renewals, and instrument proficiency checks. How and Where Would I Receive This Training? Currently, the FAA is offering the ‘‘Washington, DC Metropolitan Airspace Training’’ on a voluntary basis via its online Web site. The online training is offered at the following FAA Safety Web site through ‘‘Online Courses’’: http:// www.faasafety.gov. If this proposed rule is adopted, this training will become mandatory. Persons wishing to take the voluntary training via this FAA Safety Web site should enter http://www.faasafety.gov and follow these steps: 1. Enroll in the ‘‘Washington, DC Metropolitan Airspace Training’’ at http://www.faasafety.gov. (If you have E:\FR\FM\05JYP1.SGM 05JYP1 EP05JY06.005</GPH> wwhite on PROD1PC61 with PROPOSALS Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 128 / Wednesday, July 5, 2006 / Proposed Rules wwhite on PROD1PC61 with PROPOSALS 38122 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 128 / Wednesday, July 5, 2006 / Proposed Rules already registered with http:// www.faasafety.gov, sign in using your email address and password and go to step 9 below.) When entering this FAA Safety Web site for the first time, you will need to register. To register, you must follow the following step-by-step procedure: Click on ‘‘Get Registered Here.’’ 2. You will next be requested to provide your e-mail address and to answer the question ‘‘Are you an airman with a current certificate?’’ (‘‘You are NOT required to have a current certificate to register’’) by checking the answer ‘‘yes’’ or ‘‘no.’’ (The following steps will assume that you are a certificated airman.) Next you should click the command ‘‘Continue.’’ 3. After clicking the command ‘‘Continue,’’ the screen will request you to input your last name (as it appears on your certificate) in the box ‘‘Your last name’’ and input your pilot certificate number in the box ‘‘Current Certificate Number.’’ Next you should click the command ‘‘Continue.’’ 4. After clicking the command ‘‘Continue,’’ the next screen will have the following announcement on it: ‘‘Your initial registration steps have been completed! Your account has been created with the faasafety.gov system and you have been assigned a temporary password to log into our system. Please check your e-mail for your password. You can then log in and begin setting up your notification preferences. Be sure to check any spam-blocking software to make sure that e-mail will be allowed to you from http://www.faasafety.gov. Thank you for participating in the FAA Safety Program.’’ 5. Once you check your e-mail for the password that was issued to you, you will log back onto the FAA Safety Web site at http://www.faasafety.gov to begin the ‘‘Washington, DC Metropolitan Airspace Training.’’ 6. To begin the ‘‘Washington, DC Metropolitan Airspace Training,’’ log on to the FAA Safety Web site at http:// www.faasafety.gov by entering your email address and newly issued password. 7. Upon entering your e-mail address and password and after clicking ‘‘Logon Now,’’ you will enter a screen that requests you to ‘‘Establish your Profile.’’ In establishing your profile, you will be asked to review and answer the boxes ‘‘Full Name/Company Name,’’ ‘‘Email Preference Type,’’ ‘‘New Desired Password,’’ and ‘‘Confirm New Password: and then click on the command ‘‘Continue.’’ 8. You will now be asked to set your personal preferences. This is done through a series of screens where you VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:27 Jul 03, 2006 Jkt 208001 can select what kind of e-mail safety notifications and information you might like to receive, what ratings you might like safety information for, and the ability to change your password or email information. Click ‘‘save’’ when finished at which time you will be taken to a verification page letting you know that your preferences have been saved. 9. On the left navigation bar, click ‘‘Aviation Learning Center.’’ 10. Click on ‘‘Online Courses.’’ 11. Click on ‘‘View the Course Catalog.’’ 12. Click on ‘‘Washington, DC Metropolitan Airspace Training’’ to begin the online training. 13. Click on ‘‘Register Now’’ which will register for the course and then take you to ‘‘My Courses’’ page where you can start the course or withdraw from the courses at anytime. This page also allows you to resume the course should you find a need to come back at a later time to finish, once you have started. 14. Throughout the training, test questions will appear at completion of each training module. The test questions must be answered correctly before the program will allow you to continue onto the next module of the training program. When you complete the last module and test questions of the training program, the program will announce on the screen, ‘‘Congratulations, you have successfully completed the FAA’s Washington, DC Metropolitan Airspace Training.’’ 15. You should then print the Certificate of Training Completion and keep it for your records. If you are ever required to show evidence of having completed that special awareness training, the Certificate of Training Completion will satisfy this requirement. The Certificate of Training Completion will identify you by name; provide your pilot certificate number; and specify the date the training was completed. If you lose your Certificate of Training Completion, you can have one reissued to you by either accessing the http://www.faasafety.gov Web site, or (after providing appropriate identification) requesting a duplicate Certificate of Training Completion from your local Flight Standards District Office (FSDO). You will not have to repeat the training program. If you should experience any problems with the FAA Safety Web site, you may contact the FAA’s Region Safety Team Manager, (FAASTeam) at your jurisdictional FSDO for assistance. You can find locations of the FSDOs on the following Web site: http:// www.faa.gov/about/office_org/ field_offices/fsdo/. PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 Would My Name Be Kept on a National Registry of Persons Who Completed the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area Training? The FAA would maintain a national registry of persons who completed our Washington, DC Metropolitan Area training. The registry would identify you by name and pilot certificate number. How Much Would This Training Cost Me? We would provide this training free of charge. Any person who has access to a personal computer and the Internet could receive this training. A person who does not own a personal computer should have access to a computer and the Internet through a local community library. However, if you do not have access to a computer, then you could complete the training free of charge by attending an FAA Safety Program Seminar presented by your local FSDO. What Kind of Software Must I Have on My Computer To Take the Training Online? Web Browser Although most PC & MAC based browsers will be able to access the site, we recommend using Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.5 or above. IE 6.0 and above is preferred. The IE browser can be downloaded for free at: http:// www.microsoft.com/windows/ie/ downloads/critical/ie6sp1/default.asp. You need to have JavaScript enabled and be able to accept cookies. These features are enabled by default. These settings can be modified by going to the advanced features under the Internet options tab. The http:// www.faasafety.gov Web site uses browser ‘‘cookies’’ to record data needed to facilitate your online session and tracking of course completion. You should also disable any popup blocking software that you might have running. Many such utilities allow you to specify which sites are allowed to use popup windows. Simply adding faasafety.gov to the allowed list of your utility should meet the needs for most functions that require popup windows. Internet Connection You need to have an Internet connection and have any firewall configured to allow access to the http:// www.faasafety.gov Web site. Screen Resolution The site is best viewed at 1024×768 screen resolution and above; although 800×600 will meet the minimum requirements. E:\FR\FM\05JYP1.SGM 05JYP1 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 128 / Wednesday, July 5, 2006 / Proposed Rules wwhite on PROD1PC61 with PROPOSALS What Would Be the Subject Areas of the Training? The training curriculum focuses on procedures for flying in and around the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ. The course consists of approximately 1 hour of aeronautical knowledge training. The training also includes an aeronautical knowledge test. The curriculum covers— • Airspace Restrictions: Æ Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ (14 CFR part 99 subpart B). Æ Washington, DC Metropolitan Area FRZ. Æ Emergency air traffic rules (§ 91.139). Æ Temporary Flight Restrictions in the— b Proximity of the Presidential and other parties (§ 91.141). b Vicinity of disaster/hazard areas (§ 91.137). b National disaster areas in the State of Hawaii (§ 91.138). b Proximity of space flight operations (§ 91.143). b Aerial demonstrations and major sporting events (§ 91.145). b Special Security Instructions (§ 99.7). • Obtaining Information About Airspace Restrictions • Accessing the NOTAM System— Identification of the distribution mechanisms to alerting pilots about NOTAMs, including how to obtain information from the Direct User Access System (DUATS), FAA website, AOPA TFR sites b Review of the NOTAMs Addressing the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace: Æ Transpose NOTAM information to a sectional or terminal chart about the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace. Æ Resources for interpreting NOTAM information into plain English and graphical representation about the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace. • Operating procedures in the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace: Æ Flight plan requirements (for opening & closing flight plans) for flying in the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace. Æ Flight plan filing procedures (e.g., no DUATS filing for Air Defense Identification Zone) for flying in the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace. Æ Equipment requirements for flying in the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace. VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:52 Jul 03, 2006 Jkt 208001 Æ Communications requirements & procedures for flying in the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace: b Whom to contact; b What to request from ATC; b What to expect from ATC (phraseology, level of service). Æ Visual warning system and intercept procedures for the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace. Æ Procedures for lost communications, electrical failure, transponder malfunction when flying in the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace. • Review of Transportation Security Administration (TSA) regulations that restrict access to the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ to those operators that have met the security requirements under TSA’s DCA Access Standard Security Program (DASSP) • Enforcement • Common errors that may cause pilots to make inadvertent incursions into the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspaces: Æ Use of global positioning system (GPS) to avoid the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace. Æ Belief that an authorization to fly in an Air Defense Identification Zone is a Class B clearance. Æ ‘‘Early rollover’’ to transponder code 1200 / VFR. Æ Unfamiliarity with filing an IFR flight plan en route to obtain an ATC clearance through the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ when having to avoid adverse weather conditions. • The operational requirements set forth under § 91.161 When Would I Be Required To Show That I Have Completed This Special Awareness Training Program? Upon request from a representative of the Administrator, an authorized representative of the National Transportation Safety Board, any Federal, State, or local law enforcement officer, or an authorized representative of the Transportation Security Administration, you would be required to provide documentation that showed that you completed the special awareness training course. A copy of your Certificate of Training Completion, which can be downloaded from the http://www.faasafety.gov Web site, will suffice. You would not need to carry the document with you, but you would be required to provide it to the requesting official in a reasonable time period. PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 38123 Economic Evaluation Summary Changes to Federal regulations must undergo several economic analyses. First, Executive Order 12866 directs that each Federal agency shall propose or adopt a regulation only upon a reasoned determination that the benefits of the intended regulation justify its costs. Second, the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 requires agencies to analyze the economic impact of regulatory changes on small entities. Third, the Trade Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 2531–2533) prohibits agencies from setting standards that create unnecessary obstacles to the foreign commerce of the United States. In developing U.S. standards, this Trade Act requires agencies to consider international standards and, where appropriate, to be the basis of U.S. standards. Fourth, the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Public Law 104–4) requires agencies to prepare a written assessment of the costs, benefits, and other effects of proposed or final rules that include a Federal mandate likely to result in the expenditure by State, local, or tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector, of $100 million or more annually (adjusted for inflation). In conducting these analyses, FAA has determined this proposed rule: (1) Has benefits that justify its costs, is a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ as defined in section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866, and is ‘‘significant’’ as defined in DOT’s Regulatory Policies and Procedures; (2) would not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities; (3) would not reduce barriers to international trade; and does not impose an unfunded mandate on State, local, or tribal governments, or on the private sector. These analyses, available in the docket, are summarized below. Total Costs and Benefits of This Rulemaking The FAA has determined that, from 2006 to 2015, the total cost of the proposed rule would be approximately $2.4 million ($2.3 million in present value terms). This total cost is composed of the value of time to persons who would be subject to the rule’s training requirements and the costs to the government of implementing the rule. Over the 10-year period, the value of pilots’ time would be approximately $2.1 million ($2.0 million in present value terms) and the cost to the government would be approximately $320,000 ($304,000 in present value terms). There have been on average 331 inadvertent incursions per year into the E:\FR\FM\05JYP1.SGM 05JYP1 38124 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 128 / Wednesday, July 5, 2006 / Proposed Rules wwhite on PROD1PC61 with PROPOSALS Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ. According to the FAA’s data on these inadvertent incursions, 5 percent resulted in aircraft interceptions, and there have been three evacuations of Federal office buildings in the last 5 years. Based on this history, the FAA performed a Monte Carlo simulation to assess the total costs of building evacuations, aircraft interceptions, and government coordination that could be mitigated by the proposed rule. In the most probable range of outcomes, the FAA could expect between 2 and 10 evacuations during the next 10 years. This range of outcomes is estimated to cost between $4.4 million and $18.3 million. The mean of avoiding these costs, or the expected benefits of the proposed rule, would be approximately $11.0 million. Because there is no way to predict the effectiveness of the proposed rule, we need a 25% success rate in reducing the number of incursions, resulting in benefits of approximately $2.8 million, for this proposed rule to be cost-beneficial. As discussed below, over a 10-year period, the FAA has calculated the cost of this proposed rule to be $2.4 million ($2.3 million discounted), which is less than the aforementioned $2.8 million. Regulatory Flexibility Determination The Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 (RFA) establishes ‘‘as a principle of regulatory issuance that agencies shall endeavor, consistent with the objective of the rule and of applicable statutes, to fit regulatory and informational requirements to the scale of the business, organizations, and governmental jurisdictions subject to regulation.’’ To achieve that principle, the RFA requires agencies to solicit and consider flexible regulatory proposals and to explain the rationale for their actions. The RFA covers a wide-range of small entities, including small businesses, not-for-profit organizations and small governmental jurisdictions. Agencies must perform a review to determine whether a proposed or final rule will have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. If the agency determines that it will, the agency must prepare a regulatory flexibility analysis as described in the Act. However, if an agency determines that a proposed or final rule is not expected to have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities, section 605(b) of the 1980 RFA provides that the head of the agency may so certify and a regulatory flexibility analysis is not required. The certification must include a statement providing the factual basis for this VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:27 Jul 03, 2006 Jkt 208001 determination, and the reasoning should be clear. The proposed rule would not have a significant impact on a substantial number of small entities. The FAA believes that the proposal’s greatest impact would be on individuals (who are not considered as entities under RFA) flying VFR within 100 nm of the DCA VOR/DME. The proposed rule could have an impact on small entities that operate aircraft for business purposes. The FAA, however, expects such an impact to be minimal because the rule would apply only to pilots operating under VFR. In addition, most of those pilots also fly for personal reasons and therefore would need to complete the training for their own nonbusiness-related flying. Consequently, the Administrator of the FAA certifies that the proposed rule would not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. The FAA invites comments and requests that all comments be accompanied with clear and detailed supporting data. International Trade Impact Assessment The Trade Agreements Act of 1979 prohibits Federal agencies from engaging in any standards or related activities that create unnecessary obstacles to the foreign commerce of the United States. Legitimate domestic objectives, such as safety, are not considered unnecessary obstacles. The statute also requires consideration of international standards and where appropriate, that they be the basis for U.S. standards. The FAA has assessed the potential effect of this proposed rule and has determined that it primarily would have an impact on domestic operations, although it could affect some international pilots. For example, there could be some Canadian pilots affected when they fly between Canada and the Southern United States. However, this rulemaking would have no impact on foreign firms that provide goods or services in the United States. Unfunded Mandates Assessment The Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (the Act) is intended, among other things, to curb the practice of imposing unfunded Federal mandates on State, local, and tribal governments. Title II of the Act requires each Federal agency to prepare a written statement assessing the effects of any Federal mandate in a proposed or final agency rule that may result in an expenditure of $100 million or more (adjusted annually for inflation) in any one year by State, local, and tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector; PO 00000 Frm 00010 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 such a mandate is deemed to be a ‘‘significant regulatory action.’’ The FAA currently uses an inflationadjusted value of $128.1 million in lieu of $100 million. This proposed rule does not contain such a mandate. The requirements of Title II do not apply. Paperwork Reduction Act An agency may not conduct or sponsor and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control number. This proposed rule would contain information collections that would be subject to review by OMB under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3507(d)). As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3507(d)), the FAA has submitted a copy of these sections to the Office of Management and Budget for its review. Individuals and organizations may submit comments on the information collection requirement by September 5, 2006, and should direct them to the address listed in the ADDRESSES section of this document. A description of the annual burden is shown below. Description of Respondents: The FAA estimates that approximately 60,000 persons that fly under VFR within 100 nautical miles of the DCA VOR/DME would be affected by the proposed rule, and that the population of affected persons would grow by approximately 1.32 percent per year. Estimated Burden: We assume that each person would spend 20 minutes taking the test, at a cost of time of $30.88 per hour. We estimate that the first-year cost would be $617,600 (60,000 persons × $30.88 per hour), and time spent during the first year would be 20,000 hours (60,000 persons × 1⁄3 hour). We estimate that in subsequent years, the per-year costs would be $8,574 (833 persons × $30.88 per hour), and time spent during subsequent years would be 277.67 hours (833 persons × 1⁄3 hour). The total cost over 10 years is expected to be $694,766.00 ($617,600 + 9 × $8,574), with an average cost per year of $69,477 ($617,600 + 9 × $8,574)/ 10). The total number of hours over 10 years is expected to be 22,499 hours (20,000 + 9 × 277.67), with an average cost per year of 2,250 hours (20,000 + 9 × 278)/10). International Compatibility In keeping with U.S. obligations under the Convention on International E:\FR\FM\05JYP1.SGM 05JYP1 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 128 / Wednesday, July 5, 2006 / Proposed Rules Civil Aviation, it is FAA policy to comply with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Standards and Recommended Practices to the maximum extent practicable. The FAA has determined that there are no ICAO Standards and Recommended Practices that correspond to these proposed regulations. Environmental Analysis FAA Order 1050.1E defines FAA actions that are categorically excluded from the preparation of an environmental assessment or environmental impact statement under the National Environmental Policy Act in the absence of extraordinary circumstances. The FAA has determined that this proposed rulemaking action qualifies for the categorical exclusion identified in paragraph 312f of FAA Order 1050.1E and involves no extraordinary circumstances. Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use The FAA has analyzed this proposed rule under Executive Order 13211, Actions Concerning Regulations that Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use (May 18, 2001). The FAA has determined that this is not a ‘‘significant energy action’’ under the executive order because it is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866, and it is not likely to have a significant adverse effect on the supply, distribution, or use of energy. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 91 Air traffic control, Aircraft, Airmen, Airports, Aviation Safety, Noise control, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. The Proposed Rule In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation Administration proposes to amend chapter I of title 14 Code of Federal Regulations as follows: PART 91—GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES wwhite on PROD1PC61 with PROPOSALS 1. The authority citation for part 91 continues to read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 1155, 40103, 40113, 40120, 44101, 44111, 44701, 44709, 44711, 44712, 44715, 44716, 44717, 44722, 46306, 46315, 46316, 46504, 46506–46507, 47122, 47508, 47528–47531, articles 12 and 29 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (61 stat. 1180). § 91.161 Additional requirements for persons flying under visual flight rules within 100 nautical miles of the DCA VOR/ DME. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (a) Except as provided under paragraph (d) of this section, no person may operate an aircraft within 100 nautical miles of the Washington, DC VHF omni-directional range/distance measuring equipment (DCA VOR/DME) under visual flight rules (VFR) without having completed the FAA’s special awareness training course on flying in and around the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area. (b) A person who is required by this section to have completed the special awareness training course on flying in and around the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area must present documentation that shows completion of the training course when requested to do so by: (1) A representative of the Administrator; (2) An authorized representative of the National Transportation Safety Board; (3) Any Federal, State, or local law enforcement officer; or (4) An authorized representative of the Transportation Security Administration. (c) The failure to complete the special awareness training course on flying in and around the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area is not a violation of this section if an emergency is declared by the pilot, as described under § 91.3(b) of this part, or there was a failure of two-way radio communications when operating under IFR as described under § 91.185 of this part. (d) If a person is conducting an aeromedical operation or an official flight for the U.S. Armed Forces or a law enforcement agency within the airspace of 100 nautical miles from the Washington, DC VHF omni-directional range/distance measuring equipment (DCA VOR/DME), the requirements of this section do not apply. [EPA–HQ–OPP–2005–0174 and EPA–HQ– OPP–2003–0373; FRL–8075–6] Issued in Washington, DC, on June 27, 2006. John M. Allen, Deputy Director, Flight Standards Service. [FR Doc. 06–5997 Filed 7–3–06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P 2. Add § 91.161 to read as follows: VerDate Aug<31>2005 19:27 Jul 03, 2006 Jkt 208001 38125 PO 00000 Frm 00011 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 40 CFR Part 180 Sulfuryl Fluoride; Request for Stay of Tolerances Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Availability of request for stay of the effectiveness of tolerances; request for comments. AGENCY: SUMMARY: This document announces the availability of a document requesting a stay of the effectiveness of various pesticide tolerances under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for sulfuryl fluoride and fluoride, and opens a public comment period on this document. This request for a stay was filed in conjunction with objections and requests for hearings that were submitted in response to promulgation of these tolerances. The stay request relies primarily on the recent report of the National Research Council on fluoride. Comments must be received on or before August 4, 2006. ADDRESSES: Submit your comments, identified by docket identification (ID) number(s) EPA–HQ–OPP–2005–0174 and/or EPA–HQ–OPP–2003–0373, by one of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: http:// www.regulations.gov. Follow the on-line instructions for submitting comments. • Mail: Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) Regulatory Public Docket (7502P), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460–0001. • Delivery: OPP Regulatory Public Docket (7502P), Environmental Protection Agency, Rm. S-4400, One Potomac Yard (South Bldg.), 2777 S. Crystal Drive, Arlington, VA. Deliveries are only accepted during the Docket’s normal hours of operation (8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays). Special arrangements should be made for deliveries of boxed information. The Docket Facility telephone number is (703) 305–5805. Instructions: Direct your comments to docket ID number(s) EPA–HQ–OPP– 2005–0174 and/or EPA–HQ–OPP–2003– 0373. EPA’s policy is that all comments received will be included in the docket without change and may be made available on-line at http:// www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided, unless DATES: E:\FR\FM\05JYP1.SGM 05JYP1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 71, Number 128 (Wednesday, July 5, 2006)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 38118-38125]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 06-5997]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 91

[Docket No. FAA-2006-25250; Notice No. 06-08]
RIN 2120-AI63


Special Awareness Training for the Washington, DC Metropolitan 
Area

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM).

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SUMMARY: This proposed rule would require special awareness training 
for any person who flies under visual flight rules (VFR) within 100 
nautical miles of the Washington, DC VHF omni-directional range/
distance measuring equipment (DCA VOR/DME). This training program is 
provided by the FAA on its Web site and focuses primarily on training 
pilots on the procedures for flying in and around the Washington, DC 
Metropolitan Area Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) and the 
Washington, DC Metropolitan Area Flight Restricted Zone (FRZ). The 
intended effect of this proposed rule is to reduce the number of 
unauthorized flights into the airspace of the Washington, DC 
Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ through education of the pilot 
community.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before September 5, 2006. See 
the note in the ``Comments Invited'' section under SUPPLEMENTARY 
INFORMATION.

ADDRESSES: You may send comments identified by docket number using any 
of the following methods:
     DOT Docket Web site: Go to http://dms.dot.gov and follow 
the instructions for sending your comments electronically.
     Mail: Docket Management Facility; U.S. Department of 
Transportation, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Nassif Building, Room PL-401, 
Washington, DC 20590-0001.
     Fax: 1-202-493-2251.
     Hand Delivery: Room PL-401 on the plaza level of the 
Nassif Building, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC, between 9 
a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.
    For more information on the rulemaking process, see the 
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of this document.
    Privacy: We will post all comments we receive, without change, to 
http://dms.dot.gov, including any personal information you provide. For 
more information, see the Privacy Act discussion in the SUPPLEMENTARY 
INFORMATION section of this document.
    Docket: To read background documents or comments received, go to 
http://dms.dot.gov at any time or to Room PL-401 on the plaza level of 
the Nassif Building, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC, between 9 
a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John D. Lynch, Certification and 
General Aviation Operations Branch, AFS-810, General Aviation and 
Commercial Division, Flight Standards Service, Federal Aviation 
Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591; 
telephone: (202) 267-3844 or (202) 267-8212; e-mail address: 
john.d.lynch@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Comments Invited

    Note: On August 4, 2005, the FAA proposed to codify current 
flight restrictions for certain aircraft operations in the 
Washington, DC, metropolitan area (70 FR 45250; Aug. 4, 2005). The 
comment period for that proposed rule closed on February 6, 2006. 
Today's NPRM is a separate action that would require special 
awareness training for any person who flies under visual flight 
rules (VFR) within 100 nautical miles of the Washington, DC VHF 
omni-directional range/distance measuring equipment (DCA VOR/DME). 
If the FAA receives comments on the August 4, 2005, proposal in 
response to this special awareness training NPRM, those comments 
will be treated as outside the scope of this rulemaking.

    The FAA invites interested persons to participate in this proposed 
rulemaking by submitting written comments, data, or views. We also 
invite comments relating to the economic, environmental, energy, or 
Federalism impacts that might result from adopting as final the 
requirements in this interim rule. The most helpful comments reference 
a specific portion of the rule, explain the reason for any recommended 
change, and include supporting data. We ask that you send us two copies 
of written comments.
    We will file in the docket all comments we receive, as well as a 
report summarizing each substantive public contact with FAA personnel 
concerning this interim rulemaking. The docket is available for public 
inspection before and after the comment closing date. If you wish to 
review the docket in person, go to the address in the ADDRESSES section 
of this preamble between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, 
except Federal holidays. You may also review the docket using

[[Page 38119]]

the Internet at the Web address in the ADDRESSES section.
    Privacy Act: Using the search function of our docket Web site, 
anyone can find and read the comments received into any of our dockets, 
including the name of the individual sending the comment (or signing 
the comment on behalf of an association, business, labor union, etc.). 
You may review DOT's complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal 
Register of April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78) or you may visit http://
dms.dot.gov.
    Before acting on this proposal, we will consider all comments we 
receive on or before the closing date for comments. We will consider 
comments filed late if it is possible to do so without incurring 
expense or delay. We may change this proposed rule in light of the 
comments we receive.
    If you want the FAA to acknowledge receipt of your comments on this 
proposed rule, include with your comments a pre-addressed, stamped 
postcard on which the docket number appears. We will stamp the date on 
the postcard and mail it to you.

Availability of Rulemaking Documents

    You can get an electronic copy using the Internet by:
    (1) Searching the Department of Transportation's electronic Docket 
Management System (DMS) Web page (http://dms.dot.gov/search);
    (2) Visiting the FAA's Regulations and Policies Web page at http://
www.faa.gov/regulations_policies; or
    (3) Accessing the Government Printing Office's Web page at http://
www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/.
    You can also get a copy by sending a request to the Federal 
Aviation Administration, Office of Rulemaking, ARM-1, 800 Independence 
Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20591, or by calling (202) 267-9680. Make 
sure to identify the docket number, notice number, or amendment number 
of this rulemaking.

Authority for This Rulemaking

    The Department of Transportation (DOT) has the responsibility, 
under the laws of the United States, to develop transportation policies 
and programs that contribute to providing fast, safe, efficient, and 
convenient transportation (49 U.S.C. 101). The FAA is an agency of DOT. 
The Administrator of the FAA has broad authority to regulate the safe 
and efficient use of the navigable airspace (49 U.S.C. 40103). The 
Administrator also is authorized to issue air traffic rules and 
regulations to govern the flight of aircraft, the navigation, 
protection and identification of aircraft for the protection of persons 
and property on the ground, and for the efficient use of navigable 
airspace. Additionally, pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 40103(b)(3) the 
Administrator has the authority, in consultation with the Secretary of 
Defense, to ``establish security provisions that will encourage and 
allow maximum use of the navigable airspace by civil aircraft 
consistent with national security.''

Background

    In February 2003, the FAA, in consultation with the Department of 
Homeland Security and other Federal agencies, implemented a system of 
airspace control measures to protect against a potential threat to the 
Washington, DC Metropolitan Area. The dimensions of this protected 
airspace were determined after considering such factors as the speed of 
likely suspect aircraft, minimum launch time and the speed of intercept 
aircraft. After extensive coordination among Federal agencies, two 
airspace areas were implemented. The outer area, which closely mimics 
the current Washington Tri-area Class B airspace, is called an Air 
Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) and requires identification of all 
flight operations within the airspace in order to ensure the security 
of protected ground assets. The inner and critical security area, 
called a Flight Restricted Zone (FRZ) is an approximate 15-nautical 
mile radius around the Washington VHF omni-directional range/distance 
measuring equipment (DCA VOR/DME) (38-51-07.512N/077-02-15.763W) where 
more stringent access procedures apply. The Washington, DC Metropolitan 
Area FRZ is part of the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ.
    Since its creation, there have been over 1,000 unauthorized flights 
(i.e., incursions) within the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ. A 
few of these flights came so close to the Capitol and the White House 
that evacuation of these buildings and other Federal office buildings 
was required. Although all of the incursions were eventually determined 
to be inadvertent in nature, each incursion places an unnecessary 
burden on Federal, State, and local law enforcement resources. For 
instance, when an unauthorized aircraft penetrates restricted airspace, 
the FAA's air traffic controllers must divert necessary resources to 
monitor the aircraft's flight, alert security operations, and 
communicate information about the aircraft to appropriate military and 
law enforcement agencies. Several branches of the Federal Government, 
military and local law enforcement are forced to respond to the 
situation and needlessly expend effort in a situation that ultimately 
is determined not to have been a threat to our national security. The 
FAA is very concerned about these incursions. Recently, there have been 
several incidents where civilian aircraft have been intercepted by U.S. 
Customs Service helicopters and U.S. Air Force fighter airplanes for 
inadvertent flights within Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ.
    In addition to the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ, other 
Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) areas have been established and 
continue to be established over certain cities and sensitive sites 
throughout the country. And, like the DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ, there 
have been inadvertent incursions into TFR airspace. The training 
required under this rulemaking will include information on not only the 
restricted airspace in the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area, but also 
restricted airspace throughout the country. In future FAA initiatives, 
we intend to increase all U.S. registered airmen's awareness and 
knowledge in flight operations and procedures in and around restricted 
airspace through modifying the content of our practical test standards, 
flight reviews, pilot proficiency checks, flight instructor renewals, 
and instrument proficiency checks.

Discussion of This Proposed Rule

    The FAA is proposing to amend 14 CFR part 91 by adding a new Sec.  
91.161. Under the proposed rule, prior to flying Visual Flight Rules 
(VFR) within a radius of 100 nautical miles of the DCA VOR/DME, a pilot 
must have completed the Special Awareness Training for the Washington, 
DC Metropolitan Area. The FAA would require compliance 180 days from 
publication of the final rule. The training, which is currently 
available online through the FAA Safety website, focuses on how to 
avoid or operate safely within the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area 
ADIZ, Washington, DC Metropolitan Area FRZ, and special use/restricted 
airspace.
    We believe that through training, the number of inadvertent 
incursions into the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ could be 
reduced. According to the United States Government Accountability 
Office's (GAO) testimony before the U.S. House of Representatives' 
Committee on Government Reform (``Agency Resources Address Violations 
of Restricted Airspace, but Management Improvements are Needed''), 
``general aviation aircraft pilots accounted for about 88% of all 
violations of restricted U.S. airspace between September 12,

[[Page 38120]]

2001 and December 31, 2004.'' In addition, GAO noted, ``pilot error is 
the biggest contributor to restricted airspace violations.'' Thus, to 
reduce the number of violations, we are proposing mandatory training to 
make pilots more aware of the location of restricted airspace and the 
procedures that must be followed to either avoid or operate in those 
areas.

Who Would Be Required to Receive This Training?

    Any person who flies an aircraft under VFR within a radius of 100 
nautical miles of the DCA VOR/DME would be required to receive the 
special awareness training required under Sec.  91.161. Thus, this 
proposed rule would apply to any person operating an aircraft under VFR 
within a 100-nautical mile radius of the DCA VOR/DME, including all 
operations conducted under 14 CFR part 91, those for which an air 
carrier or an operating certificate may be issued under 14 CFR part 119 
(for operations conducted under 14 CFR part 121 or 135), and those 
which may be conducted under part 125, 129, 133 or 137. Further, 
regardless of the type of pilot certificate held (e.g., sport, 
recreational, student, private, commercial or foreign) or where the 
flight originated (e.g., Virginia, California or even Canada), a person 
would be subject to the training requirement as a pre-condition to 
flying under VFR within 100 nautical miles of the DCA VOR/DME. Note 
this special awareness training would not be required for pilots who 
operate under instrument flight rules (IFR) within a 100-nautical mile 
radius of the DCA VOR/DME.
    As previously noted, there have been over 1,000 unauthorized 
flights into the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ since February 
2003. To date, no criminal charges have been filed against any pilot. 
Of all the cases investigated, only one incursion was deemed 
deliberate. This led to the revocation of the pilot's certificate. We 
believe that the other incursions are a direct result of general 
aviation pilots under VFR flying off-course and not recognizing that 
they had entered restricted airspace without following proper 
procedure. Pilots, on the other hand, who fly under IFR are under the 
control of the FAA's Air Traffic Control system and, therefore, are 
under a controlled flight plan and routing that either allows them to 
enter the restricted airspace or avoid the airspace. Thus, at this 
time, we do not believe that requiring pilots who would fly under IFR 
within or near Washington, DC Metropolitan Area restricted airspace 
will address our immediate concern of reducing the number of 
inadvertent incursions into the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ. 
The proposed rule consequently only would apply to persons flying 
aircraft under VFR within a 100-nautical mile radius of the DCA VOR/
DME.

Would There Be Any Operations Excluded From the Requirements Under 
Sec.  91.161?

    Yes. We recognize there are certain operations that must be handled 
differently because of their importance to national security and safety 
and for the public interest. Historically, we have provided special 
consideration for operations by the U.S. Department of Defense/U.S. 
military and law enforcement and for approved aeromedical flights. The 
flight restrictions for the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and 
FRZ specifically exempt these types of operations from certain 
requirements otherwise applicable to aircraft entering the ADIZ and FRZ 
(see NOTAM FDC 3/2126). Furthermore, to our knowledge, none of the 
inadvertent incursions into the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ 
has involved pilots conducting such operations. Consequently, under 
Sec.  91.161(e), the FAA would exempt a person flying an aircraft in a 
U.S. Department of Defense/U.S. military or law enforcement operation, 
or for approved aeromedical assistance from the training requirements. 
This exclusion, however, only would apply if the person is flying on an 
official U.S. Department of Defense/U.S. military, law enforcement, or 
approved aeromedical operation. If the military pilot, law enforcement 
pilot, or aeromedical pilot exercised private pilot privileges under 
VFR within 100 nautical miles of the DCA VOR/DME, this special 
awareness training (under Sec.  91.161) would be required.

Why Was the Distance of a ``100 Nautical Miles Radius'' of the DCA VOR/
DME Selected?

    After reviewing extensive data, we believe that only pilots flying 
within a 100-nautical mile radius of the DCA VOR/DME under VFR should 
be subject to the training requirement. Based on the statistics 
compiled, we determined that the majority of pilots who inadvertently 
entered the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ had either originated 
their flight within this 100-nautical mile radius or their last point 
of departure was within this 100-nautical mile radius. Several 
alternatives were considered for who should complete the training, 
including subjecting only--(1) pilots residing in Virginia, Maryland, 
Pennsylvania, North Carolina, West Virginia and the District of 
Columbia; (2) pilots flying VFR over Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, 
North Carolina, West Virginia and the District of Columbia; or (3) 
pilots that fly VFR within a 250 nautical mile radius of the 
Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ. We, however, believe that each 
of these alternatives is either overly broad or unduly complex.
    The airspace 100 nautical miles from the DCA VOR/DME would not 
appear on the Washington, DC sectional aeronautical chart. Pilots, 
however, could easily plot the ``training zone'' on the appropriate 
sectional map(s) on their own. See Diagram 1. Further, we would provide 
a map that you could print through the FAA Safety Web site (http://
www.faasafety.gov) for this course.

[[Page 38121]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TP05JY06.005

Would This Training Apply to Me if I Intended To Fly IFR but Cancelled 
My IFR Clearance and Proceeded VFR?

    We recognize there may be instances when a pilot operating under 
IFR must cancel an IFR clearance and continue the flight under VFR. For 
example, a pilot may be flying under IFR within the 100-nautical mile 
radius of the DCA VOR/DME, but due to radio or instrument equipment 
problems, must cancel IFR clearance and proceed under VFR. Under that 
scenario, the failure to complete the special awareness-training 
program required under proposed Sec.  91.161would not be a violation of 
the federal regulations. Additionally, in an in-flight emergency 
situation, the pilot in command could deviate from any rule under part 
91 to the extent necessary to meet that emergency. See 14 CFR 91.3(b). 
The FAA, however, may investigate the situation and request that the 
pilot provide a written explanation for the deviation.
    In contrast, if a pilot of his or her own volition cancelled the 
IFR clearance while operating within the 100-nautical mile radius of 
the DCA VOR/DME and proceeded VFR, then the requirements under Sec.  
91.161 would apply.

When Would I Have To Comply?

    After a compliance date 180 days from effective date of the final 
rule, any person that flew within 100 nautical miles of the DCA VOR/DME 
under VFR would have to comply with the requirements of 14 CFR 91.161. 
We believe 180 days would be sufficient time for affected persons to 
complete the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area special awareness 
training program.

How Often Would This Training Be Required?

    The proposed Washington, DC Metropolitan Area special awareness 
training would be a ``one-time'' obligation. Specifically, if this rule 
applied to you, you would only have to accomplish the special training 
course one time. However, we would encourage you to repeat the training 
when you feel you need to refresh your knowledge. In future initiatives 
we intend to ensure that all pilots receive recurrent training on 
flight procedures for operating in prohibited and restricted airspace, 
including the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ. We expect 
to accomplish this future training through additional training and 
testing during practical tests, flight reviews, pilot proficiency 
checks, flight instructor renewals, and instrument proficiency checks.

How and Where Would I Receive This Training?

    Currently, the FAA is offering the ``Washington, DC Metropolitan 
Airspace Training'' on a voluntary basis via its online Web site. The 
online training is offered at the following FAA Safety Web site through 
``Online Courses'': http://www.faasafety.gov. If this proposed rule is 
adopted, this training will become mandatory.
    Persons wishing to take the voluntary training via this FAA Safety 
Web site should enter http://www.faasafety.gov and follow these steps:
    1. Enroll in the ``Washington, DC Metropolitan Airspace Training'' 
at http://www.faasafety.gov. (If you have

[[Page 38122]]

already registered with http://www.faasafety.gov, sign in using your e-
mail address and password and go to step 9 below.) When entering this 
FAA Safety Web site for the first time, you will need to register. To 
register, you must follow the following step-by-step procedure: Click 
on ``Get Registered Here.''
    2. You will next be requested to provide your e-mail address and to 
answer the question ``Are you an airman with a current certificate?'' 
(``You are NOT required to have a current certificate to register'') by 
checking the answer ``yes'' or ``no.'' (The following steps will assume 
that you are a certificated airman.) Next you should click the command 
``Continue.''
    3. After clicking the command ``Continue,'' the screen will request 
you to input your last name (as it appears on your certificate) in the 
box ``Your last name'' and input your pilot certificate number in the 
box ``Current Certificate Number.'' Next you should click the command 
``Continue.''
    4. After clicking the command ``Continue,'' the next screen will 
have the following announcement on it: ``Your initial registration 
steps have been completed! Your account has been created with the 
faasafety.gov system and you have been assigned a temporary password to 
log into our system. Please check your e-mail for your password. You 
can then log in and begin setting up your notification preferences. Be 
sure to check any spam-blocking software to make sure that e-mail will 
be allowed to you from http://www.faasafety.gov. Thank you for 
participating in the FAA Safety Program.''
    5. Once you check your e-mail for the password that was issued to 
you, you will log back onto the FAA Safety Web site at http://
www.faasafety.gov to begin the ``Washington, DC Metropolitan Airspace 
Training.''
    6. To begin the ``Washington, DC Metropolitan Airspace Training,'' 
log on to the FAA Safety Web site at http://www.faasafety.gov by 
entering your e-mail address and newly issued password.
    7. Upon entering your e-mail address and password and after 
clicking ``Logon Now,'' you will enter a screen that requests you to 
``Establish your Profile.'' In establishing your profile, you will be 
asked to review and answer the boxes ``Full Name/Company Name,'' 
``Email Preference Type,'' ``New Desired Password,'' and ``Confirm New 
Password: and then click on the command ``Continue.''
    8. You will now be asked to set your personal preferences. This is 
done through a series of screens where you can select what kind of e-
mail safety notifications and information you might like to receive, 
what ratings you might like safety information for, and the ability to 
change your password or e-mail information. Click ``save'' when 
finished at which time you will be taken to a verification page letting 
you know that your preferences have been saved.
    9. On the left navigation bar, click ``Aviation Learning Center.''
    10. Click on ``Online Courses.''
    11. Click on ``View the Course Catalog.''
    12. Click on ``Washington, DC Metropolitan Airspace Training'' to 
begin the online training.
    13. Click on ``Register Now'' which will register for the course 
and then take you to ``My Courses'' page where you can start the course 
or withdraw from the courses at anytime. This page also allows you to 
resume the course should you find a need to come back at a later time 
to finish, once you have started.
    14. Throughout the training, test questions will appear at 
completion of each training module. The test questions must be answered 
correctly before the program will allow you to continue onto the next 
module of the training program. When you complete the last module and 
test questions of the training program, the program will announce on 
the screen, ``Congratulations, you have successfully completed the 
FAA's Washington, DC Metropolitan Airspace Training.''
    15. You should then print the Certificate of Training Completion 
and keep it for your records. If you are ever required to show evidence 
of having completed that special awareness training, the Certificate of 
Training Completion will satisfy this requirement. The Certificate of 
Training Completion will identify you by name; provide your pilot 
certificate number; and specify the date the training was completed. If 
you lose your Certificate of Training Completion, you can have one 
reissued to you by either accessing the http://www.faasafety.gov Web 
site, or (after providing appropriate identification) requesting a 
duplicate Certificate of Training Completion from your local Flight 
Standards District Office (FSDO). You will not have to repeat the 
training program.
    If you should experience any problems with the FAA Safety Web site, 
you may contact the FAA's Region Safety Team Manager, (FAASTeam) at 
your jurisdictional FSDO for assistance. You can find locations of the 
FSDOs on the following Web site: http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/
field_offices/fsdo/.

Would My Name Be Kept on a National Registry of Persons Who Completed 
the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area Training?

    The FAA would maintain a national registry of persons who completed 
our Washington, DC Metropolitan Area training. The registry would 
identify you by name and pilot certificate number.

How Much Would This Training Cost Me?

    We would provide this training free of charge. Any person who has 
access to a personal computer and the Internet could receive this 
training. A person who does not own a personal computer should have 
access to a computer and the Internet through a local community 
library. However, if you do not have access to a computer, then you 
could complete the training free of charge by attending an FAA Safety 
Program Seminar presented by your local FSDO.

What Kind of Software Must I Have on My Computer To Take the Training 
Online?

Web Browser
    Although most PC & MAC based browsers will be able to access the 
site, we recommend using Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.5 or above. IE 
6.0 and above is preferred. The IE browser can be downloaded for free 
at: http://www.microsoft.com/windows/ie/downloads/critical/ie6sp1/
default.asp.
    You need to have JavaScript enabled and be able to accept cookies. 
These features are enabled by default. These settings can be modified 
by going to the advanced features under the Internet options tab. The 
http://www.faasafety.gov Web site uses browser ``cookies'' to record 
data needed to facilitate your online session and tracking of course 
completion.
    You should also disable any popup blocking software that you might 
have running. Many such utilities allow you to specify which sites are 
allowed to use popup windows. Simply adding faasafety.gov to the 
allowed list of your utility should meet the needs for most functions 
that require popup windows.
Internet Connection
    You need to have an Internet connection and have any firewall 
configured to allow access to the http://www.faasafety.gov Web site.
Screen Resolution
    The site is best viewed at 1024x768 screen resolution and above; 
although 800x600 will meet the minimum requirements.

[[Page 38123]]

What Would Be the Subject Areas of the Training?

    The training curriculum focuses on procedures for flying in and 
around the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ. The course 
consists of approximately 1 hour of aeronautical knowledge training. 
The training also includes an aeronautical knowledge test. The 
curriculum covers--
     Airspace Restrictions:
    [cir] Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ (14 CFR part 99 subpart 
B).
    [cir] Washington, DC Metropolitan Area FRZ.
    [cir] Emergency air traffic rules (Sec.  91.139).
    [cir] Temporary Flight Restrictions in the--
    [ballot] Proximity of the Presidential and other parties (Sec.  
91.141).
    [ballot] Vicinity of disaster/hazard areas (Sec.  91.137).
    [ballot] National disaster areas in the State of Hawaii (Sec.  
91.138).
    [ballot] Proximity of space flight operations (Sec.  91.143).
    [ballot] Aerial demonstrations and major sporting events (Sec.  
91.145).
    [ballot] Special Security Instructions (Sec.  99.7).
     Obtaining Information About Airspace Restrictions
     Accessing the NOTAM System--Identification of the 
distribution mechanisms to alerting pilots about NOTAMs, including how 
to obtain information from the Direct User Access System (DUATS), FAA 
website, AOPA TFR sites
    [ballot] Review of the NOTAMs Addressing the Washington, DC 
Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace:
    [cir] Transpose NOTAM information to a sectional or terminal chart 
about the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace.
    [cir] Resources for interpreting NOTAM information into plain 
English and graphical representation about the Washington, DC 
Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace.
     Operating procedures in the Washington, DC Metropolitan 
Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace:
    [cir] Flight plan requirements (for opening & closing flight plans) 
for flying in the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ 
airspace.
    [cir] Flight plan filing procedures (e.g., no DUATS filing for Air 
Defense Identification Zone) for flying in the Washington, DC 
Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace.
    [cir] Equipment requirements for flying in the Washington, DC 
Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace.
    [cir] Communications requirements & procedures for flying in the 
Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace:
    [ballot] Whom to contact;
    [ballot] What to request from ATC;
    [ballot] What to expect from ATC (phraseology, level of service).
    [cir] Visual warning system and intercept procedures for the 
Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace.
    [cir] Procedures for lost communications, electrical failure, 
transponder malfunction when flying in the Washington, DC Metropolitan 
Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace.
     Review of Transportation Security Administration (TSA) 
regulations that restrict access to the Washington, DC Metropolitan 
Area ADIZ and FRZ to those operators that have met the security 
requirements under TSA's DCA Access Standard Security Program (DASSP)
     Enforcement
     Common errors that may cause pilots to make inadvertent 
incursions into the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ 
airspaces:
    [cir] Use of global positioning system (GPS) to avoid the 
Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ and FRZ airspace.
    [cir] Belief that an authorization to fly in an Air Defense 
Identification Zone is a Class B clearance.
    [cir] ``Early rollover'' to transponder code 1200 / VFR.
    [cir] Unfamiliarity with filing an IFR flight plan en route to 
obtain an ATC clearance through the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area 
ADIZ and FRZ when having to avoid adverse weather conditions.
     The operational requirements set forth under Sec.  91.161

When Would I Be Required To Show That I Have Completed This Special 
Awareness Training Program?

    Upon request from a representative of the Administrator, an 
authorized representative of the National Transportation Safety Board, 
any Federal, State, or local law enforcement officer, or an authorized 
representative of the Transportation Security Administration, you would 
be required to provide documentation that showed that you completed the 
special awareness training course. A copy of your Certificate of 
Training Completion, which can be downloaded from the http://
www.faasafety.gov Web site, will suffice. You would not need to carry 
the document with you, but you would be required to provide it to the 
requesting official in a reasonable time period.

Economic Evaluation Summary

    Changes to Federal regulations must undergo several economic 
analyses. First, Executive Order 12866 directs that each Federal agency 
shall propose or adopt a regulation only upon a reasoned determination 
that the benefits of the intended regulation justify its costs. Second, 
the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 requires agencies to analyze the 
economic impact of regulatory changes on small entities. Third, the 
Trade Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 2531-2533) prohibits agencies from 
setting standards that create unnecessary obstacles to the foreign 
commerce of the United States. In developing U.S. standards, this Trade 
Act requires agencies to consider international standards and, where 
appropriate, to be the basis of U.S. standards. Fourth, the Unfunded 
Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Public Law 104-4) requires agencies to 
prepare a written assessment of the costs, benefits, and other effects 
of proposed or final rules that include a Federal mandate likely to 
result in the expenditure by State, local, or tribal governments, in 
the aggregate, or by the private sector, of $100 million or more 
annually (adjusted for inflation).
    In conducting these analyses, FAA has determined this proposed 
rule: (1) Has benefits that justify its costs, is a ``significant 
regulatory action'' as defined in section 3(f) of Executive Order 
12866, and is ``significant'' as defined in DOT's Regulatory Policies 
and Procedures; (2) would not have a significant economic impact on a 
substantial number of small entities; (3) would not reduce barriers to 
international trade; and does not impose an unfunded mandate on State, 
local, or tribal governments, or on the private sector. These analyses, 
available in the docket, are summarized below.

Total Costs and Benefits of This Rulemaking

    The FAA has determined that, from 2006 to 2015, the total cost of 
the proposed rule would be approximately $2.4 million ($2.3 million in 
present value terms). This total cost is composed of the value of time 
to persons who would be subject to the rule's training requirements and 
the costs to the government of implementing the rule. Over the 10-year 
period, the value of pilots' time would be approximately $2.1 million 
($2.0 million in present value terms) and the cost to the government 
would be approximately $320,000 ($304,000 in present value terms).
    There have been on average 331 inadvertent incursions per year into 
the

[[Page 38124]]

Washington, DC Metropolitan Area ADIZ. According to the FAA's data on 
these inadvertent incursions, 5 percent resulted in aircraft 
interceptions, and there have been three evacuations of Federal office 
buildings in the last 5 years. Based on this history, the FAA performed 
a Monte Carlo simulation to assess the total costs of building 
evacuations, aircraft interceptions, and government coordination that 
could be mitigated by the proposed rule. In the most probable range of 
outcomes, the FAA could expect between 2 and 10 evacuations during the 
next 10 years. This range of outcomes is estimated to cost between $4.4 
million and $18.3 million. The mean of avoiding these costs, or the 
expected benefits of the proposed rule, would be approximately $11.0 
million. Because there is no way to predict the effectiveness of the 
proposed rule, we need a 25% success rate in reducing the number of 
incursions, resulting in benefits of approximately $2.8 million, for 
this proposed rule to be cost-beneficial. As discussed below, over a 
10-year period, the FAA has calculated the cost of this proposed rule 
to be $2.4 million ($2.3 million discounted), which is less than the 
aforementioned $2.8 million.

Regulatory Flexibility Determination

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 (RFA) establishes ``as a 
principle of regulatory issuance that agencies shall endeavor, 
consistent with the objective of the rule and of applicable statutes, 
to fit regulatory and informational requirements to the scale of the 
business, organizations, and governmental jurisdictions subject to 
regulation.'' To achieve that principle, the RFA requires agencies to 
solicit and consider flexible regulatory proposals and to explain the 
rationale for their actions. The RFA covers a wide-range of small 
entities, including small businesses, not-for-profit organizations and 
small governmental jurisdictions.
    Agencies must perform a review to determine whether a proposed or 
final rule will have a significant economic impact on a substantial 
number of small entities. If the agency determines that it will, the 
agency must prepare a regulatory flexibility analysis as described in 
the Act. However, if an agency determines that a proposed or final rule 
is not expected to have a significant economic impact on a substantial 
number of small entities, section 605(b) of the 1980 RFA provides that 
the head of the agency may so certify and a regulatory flexibility 
analysis is not required. The certification must include a statement 
providing the factual basis for this determination, and the reasoning 
should be clear.
    The proposed rule would not have a significant impact on a 
substantial number of small entities. The FAA believes that the 
proposal's greatest impact would be on individuals (who are not 
considered as entities under RFA) flying VFR within 100 nm of the DCA 
VOR/DME. The proposed rule could have an impact on small entities that 
operate aircraft for business purposes. The FAA, however, expects such 
an impact to be minimal because the rule would apply only to pilots 
operating under VFR. In addition, most of those pilots also fly for 
personal reasons and therefore would need to complete the training for 
their own non-business-related flying. Consequently, the Administrator 
of the FAA certifies that the proposed rule would not have a 
significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. 
The FAA invites comments and requests that all comments be accompanied 
with clear and detailed supporting data.

International Trade Impact Assessment

    The Trade Agreements Act of 1979 prohibits Federal agencies from 
engaging in any standards or related activities that create unnecessary 
obstacles to the foreign commerce of the United States. Legitimate 
domestic objectives, such as safety, are not considered unnecessary 
obstacles. The statute also requires consideration of international 
standards and where appropriate, that they be the basis for U.S. 
standards.
    The FAA has assessed the potential effect of this proposed rule and 
has determined that it primarily would have an impact on domestic 
operations, although it could affect some international pilots. For 
example, there could be some Canadian pilots affected when they fly 
between Canada and the Southern United States. However, this rulemaking 
would have no impact on foreign firms that provide goods or services in 
the United States.

Unfunded Mandates Assessment

    The Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (the Act) is intended, 
among other things, to curb the practice of imposing unfunded Federal 
mandates on State, local, and tribal governments. Title II of the Act 
requires each Federal agency to prepare a written statement assessing 
the effects of any Federal mandate in a proposed or final agency rule 
that may result in an expenditure of $100 million or more (adjusted 
annually for inflation) in any one year by State, local, and tribal 
governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector; such a mandate 
is deemed to be a ``significant regulatory action.'' The FAA currently 
uses an inflation-adjusted value of $128.1 million in lieu of $100 
million.
    This proposed rule does not contain such a mandate. The 
requirements of Title II do not apply.

Paperwork Reduction Act

    An agency may not conduct or sponsor and a person is not required 
to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a 
currently valid Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control number.
    This proposed rule would contain information collections that would 
be subject to review by OMB under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 
(44 U.S.C. 3507(d)). As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 
(44 U.S.C. 3507(d)), the FAA has submitted a copy of these sections to 
the Office of Management and Budget for its review.
    Individuals and organizations may submit comments on the 
information collection requirement by September 5, 2006, and should 
direct them to the address listed in the ADDRESSES section of this 
document.
    A description of the annual burden is shown below.
    Description of Respondents: The FAA estimates that approximately 
60,000 persons that fly under VFR within 100 nautical miles of the DCA 
VOR/DME would be affected by the proposed rule, and that the population 
of affected persons would grow by approximately 1.32 percent per year.
    Estimated Burden: We assume that each person would spend 20 minutes 
taking the test, at a cost of time of $30.88 per hour. We estimate that 
the first-year cost would be $617,600 (60,000 persons x $30.88 per 
hour), and time spent during the first year would be 20,000 hours 
(60,000 persons x \1/3\ hour). We estimate that in subsequent years, 
the per-year costs would be $8,574 (833 persons x $30.88 per hour), and 
time spent during subsequent years would be 277.67 hours (833 persons x 
\1/3\ hour).
    The total cost over 10 years is expected to be $694,766.00 
($617,600 + 9 x $8,574), with an average cost per year of $69,477 
($617,600 + 9 x $8,574)/10).
    The total number of hours over 10 years is expected to be 22,499 
hours (20,000 + 9 x 277.67), with an average cost per year of 2,250 
hours (20,000 + 9 x 278)/10).

International Compatibility

    In keeping with U.S. obligations under the Convention on 
International

[[Page 38125]]

Civil Aviation, it is FAA policy to comply with International Civil 
Aviation Organization (ICAO) Standards and Recommended Practices to the 
maximum extent practicable. The FAA has determined that there are no 
ICAO Standards and Recommended Practices that correspond to these 
proposed regulations.

Environmental Analysis

    FAA Order 1050.1E defines FAA actions that are categorically 
excluded from the preparation of an environmental assessment or 
environmental impact statement under the National Environmental Policy 
Act in the absence of extraordinary circumstances. The FAA has 
determined that this proposed rulemaking action qualifies for the 
categorical exclusion identified in paragraph 312f of FAA Order 1050.1E 
and involves no extraordinary circumstances.

Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or 
Use

    The FAA has analyzed this proposed rule under Executive Order 
13211, Actions Concerning Regulations that Significantly Affect Energy 
Supply, Distribution, or Use (May 18, 2001). The FAA has determined 
that this is not a ``significant energy action'' under the executive 
order because it is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under 
Executive Order 12866, and it is not likely to have a significant 
adverse effect on the supply, distribution, or use of energy.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 91

    Air traffic control, Aircraft, Airmen, Airports, Aviation Safety, 
Noise control, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

The Proposed Rule

    In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation 
Administration proposes to amend chapter I of title 14 Code of Federal 
Regulations as follows:

PART 91--GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES

    1. The authority citation for part 91 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 1155, 40103, 40113, 40120, 44101, 
44111, 44701, 44709, 44711, 44712, 44715, 44716, 44717, 44722, 
46306, 46315, 46316, 46504, 46506-46507, 47122, 47508, 47528-47531, 
articles 12 and 29 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation 
(61 stat. 1180).

    2. Add Sec.  91.161 to read as follows:


Sec.  91.161  Additional requirements for persons flying under visual 
flight rules within 100 nautical miles of the DCA VOR/DME.

    (a) Except as provided under paragraph (d) of this section, no 
person may operate an aircraft within 100 nautical miles of the 
Washington, DC VHF omni-directional range/distance measuring equipment 
(DCA VOR/DME) under visual flight rules (VFR) without having completed 
the FAA's special awareness training course on flying in and around the 
Washington, DC Metropolitan Area.
    (b) A person who is required by this section to have completed the 
special awareness training course on flying in and around the 
Washington, DC Metropolitan Area must present documentation that shows 
completion of the training course when requested to do so by:
    (1) A representative of the Administrator;
    (2) An authorized representative of the National Transportation 
Safety Board;
    (3) Any Federal, State, or local law enforcement officer; or
    (4) An authorized representative of the Transportation Security 
Administration.
    (c) The failure to complete the special awareness training course 
on flying in and around the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area is not a 
violation of this section if an emergency is declared by the pilot, as 
described under Sec.  91.3(b) of this part, or there was a failure of 
two-way radio communications when operating under IFR as described 
under Sec.  91.185 of this part.
    (d) If a person is conducting an aeromedical operation or an 
official flight for the U.S. Armed Forces or a law enforcement agency 
within the airspace of 100 nautical miles from the Washington, DC VHF 
omni-directional range/distance measuring equipment (DCA VOR/DME), the 
requirements of this section do not apply.

    Issued in Washington, DC, on June 27, 2006.
John M. Allen,
Deputy Director, Flight Standards Service.
[FR Doc. 06-5997 Filed 7-3-06; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P